Loyola University Chicago

Institute of Environmental Sustainability

Environmental Science Courses

Students will take at least two courses from more than 45 courses we offer in environmental sciences and quantitative methods. Select courses based on your particular interests; many also count toward the required concentration areas.

Required Core Course

ENVS 401 – Sustainable Systems: Ecological Perspectives

Learn how an integrated viewpoint on environmental science and sustainability connects the goals of ecosystem protection and sustainable development. Joining these objectives ensures fair and just solutions for both people and the planet. Determine best practices in evaluating data in environmental science and sustainability and making ethically informed decisions about them.

Courses in Ecology and Conservation Biology

    ENVS 420 – Conservation Biology

    Students will learn to apply ecological and evolutionary biological principles to the preservation of wild plant/animal species, and to the preservation/management of ecosystems. Conservation approaches and challenges for all types of ecosystems will be covered with emphasis on contemporary threats to biodiversity, including habitat fragmentation, invasive species, and climate change. Outcomes: Students will understand how the science of ecology can be used to address issues in species/ecosystem conservation and recognize that consideration of human actions is essential to address conservation problems.

    ENVS 422 - Invasive Species

    Invasive species are one of the greatest global threats to biodiversity, ecosystem function, economies, and human health. Species become invasive when moved beyond native range, become established, and cause harm. This course covers how species are moved, how and when they become established, and potential harm they can cause.

    ENVS 425 - Sustainable Agriculture

    This course provides an introduction to the environmental, social, and economic implications of sustainable agriculture. Students will learn the origins, major concepts, and current issues of sustainability in agriculture. Ecological concepts and principles applied to manage sustainable food production to support community health and economic justice will be explored. Outcomes: Students will be able to explain the characteristics of the U.S. agricultural system, the interrelation among components of sustainable agriculture, and steps necessary to develop a sustainable agricultural system.

    ENVS 426 - Agroecosystems

    In this hands-on course, students will build knowledge and skills in agriculture and ecology through work in greenhouse, laboratory, classroom, and field settings. Students will build on foundations of environmental science and biology by examining challenges of food production, management decisions, and environmental change facing agroecosystems both locally and abroad. Outcomes: Students will develop understanding of agricultural systems as related to sustainable practices, develop skills in ecological analysis of these systems, and demonstrate proficiency in communicating scientific information to diverse audiences.

    ENVS 430 - Restoration Ecology

    In this hands-on course, students will build knowledge and skills in agriculture and ecology through work in greenhouse, laboratory, classroom, and field settings. Students will build on foundations of Environmental Science and Biology by examining challenges of food production, management decisions, and environmental change facing agroecosystems both locally and abroad. Outcomes: Students will develop understanding of agricultural systems as related to sustainable practices, develop skills in ecological analysis of these systems, and demonstrate proficiency in communicating scientific information to diverse audiences.

    ENVS 469 - Field Ornithology

    Field ornithology is an intensive three-week engaged-learning course at the Loyola University Retreat and Ecology Campus during the peak of the migratory season intended to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of field ornithology. Emphasis will be on field identification and song recognition, census techniques, and avian behavior.

    ENVS 484 - Conservation Economics

    Explores resource conservation issues using economic principles. Topics include management of forests, wildlife and mineral resources; the demand for parks and outdoor recreation; the debate between environmental preservation and conservation; valuation of ecosystem services; the economics of biodiversity and endangered species; and policies to promote conservation in agriculture. Outcomes: Students will learn how natural resource use is affected by economic values, how to critically evaluate natural resource management problems, and evaluate models of dynamic resource extraction and user preferences.

    BIOL 416 - Limnology Lec/Lab

    BIOL 418 - Aquatic Insects Lec/Lab

    BIOL 495 - Metagenomics

Courses in Environmental Health

ENVS 438 - Climate Change and Human Health

This course provides an introduction overview of the health consequences associated with climate change and the local, federal, and global response to mitigate these negative health outcomes. During the course, students will be expected to incorporate course content and develop a realistic response public health plan to climate change for a locality of their choosing.

ENVS 487 - Principles of Ecotoxicology

This course will provide information on how pollutants affect ecosystems and how we might ameliorate their negative effects in our world. The emphasis of this course will be the fate and effects of pollutants in the ecosystem. The effects will be from the molecular level to organisms, communities, and ecosystem levels. Outcomes: This course will provide students with scientific knowledge in the cause and effects of pollutants in ecosystems and to prepare them for graduate study and/or a future career.

ENVS 489 - Ecological Risk Assessment

This course covers the area of potential effects of pollutants to ecosystems and practices on risk assessment for pollutants based on exposure and effect data in the literature. Different approaches for assessing the potential ecological impacts and risks of pollutants in support of environmental management will be discussed and practiced.

MPBH 401 - Environmental Health (online)

MPBH 402 - Public Health Practice and Management (online)

MPBH 403 - Introduction to Epidemiology (online)

MPBH 407 - Public Health Policy

MPBH 423 - Intermediate Epidemiology

Courses in Environmental Data Analysis

    ENVS 480 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    This course is intended for upper-division undergraduates (junior/senior) and graduate students. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a mapping tool that allows users to create interactive searches, analyze spatial information, edit data and maps, and present the results visually. The course includes lecture, laboratory, and project components. Students will learn basic GIS skills and applications and work on projects with community organizations. Outcomes: Students will be able to describe the conceptual/theoretical and practical/technological background of GIS; describe ethical issues germane to GIS; prepare/analyze GIS data in research; apply GIS in community-service projects.

    ENVS 481 - Advanced GIS Applications

    Students in this course will learn tools required to solve complex environmental problems and gain experience with spatial analysis, network analysis, 3-D analysis, GIS modeling, geostatistics, and other ArcGIS extensions. Students will also learn about internet-based mapping for dissemination of spatial data. Outcomes: Students will learn to understand various spatial relationship concepts, as well as how and when to apply them; identify and address common methodological challenges; understand strengths and weaknesses of analysis methods and spatial relationship models; advance ability to use spatial evidence to make sound arguments in planning/policy; improve abilities in cartography, data management, and spatial problem solving. Prerequisite: ENVS 480.

    ENVS 488 - Applied Environmental Statistics

    Tools and methods for analyzing combined social and ecological datasets. Emphasis on learning advanced quantitative statistics and applying this to project work. Students required to include both ecological and social data analysis in their projects – working with computer programs and output written in R/R-Studio, and interpreting output from these programs. Outcomes: Students will learn to understand and be able to articulate fundamental statistical concepts; interpret software output and published articles; communicate results; describe data, articulate relevant hypotheses, know statistical tests which may be correctly applied.

    BIOL 470 - Biostatistics and Experimental Design Lec/Lab

    MPBH 404 - Biostatistics for Health and Biological Science

    MPBH 409 - Biostatistics I

    MPBH 412 - Intro to Statistical Computing for Public Health

    MPBH 421 - Biostatistics II

    MPP 401 - Analytical Tools in Public Policy

    MPP 402 - Cost Benefit Analysis

    MPP 403 - Public Budgeting and Finance

    MPP 405 - Statistical Methods & Analysis for Public Policy I

    MPP 406 - Statistical Methods & Analysis for Public Policy II

    SOCL 414 - Statistical Methods of Analysis I

    SOCL 415 - Statistical Methods of Analysis II

    STAT 403 - SAS Programming & Applied Statistics

    STAT 407 - Statistical Design & Analysis of Experiments

    STAT 408 - Applied Regression Analysis

    STAT 410 - Categorical Data Analysis

    STAT 411 - Applied Survival Analysis

    STAT 436 - Topics in Biostatistics

Courses in Sustainable Food and Agriculture

    ENVS 420 – Conservation Biology

    Students will learn to apply ecological and evolutionary biological principles to the preservation of wild plant/animal species, and to the preservation/management of ecosystems. Conservation approaches and challenges for all types of ecosystems will be covered with emphasis on contemporary threats to biodiversity, including habitat fragmentation, invasive species, and climate change. Outcomes: Students will understand how the science of ecology can be used to address issues in species/ecosystem conservation and recognize that consideration of human actions is essential to address conservation problems.

    ENVS 425 - Sustainable Agriculture

    This course provides an introduction to the environmental, social, and economic implications of sustainable agriculture. Students will learn the origins, major concepts, and current issues of sustainability in agriculture. Ecological concepts and principles applied to manage sustainable food production to support community health and economic justice will be explored. Outcomes: Students will be able to explain the characteristics of the U.S. agricultural system, the interrelation among components of sustainable agriculture, and steps necessary to develop a sustainable agricultural system.

    ENVS 426 - Agroecosystems

    In this hands-on course, students will build knowledge and skills in agriculture and ecology through work in greenhouse, laboratory, classroom, and field settings. Students will build on foundations of environmental science and biology by examining challenges of food production, management decisions, and environmental change facing agroecosystems both locally and abroad. Outcomes: Students will develop understanding of agricultural systems as related to sustainable practices, develop skills in ecological analysis of these systems, and demonstrate proficiency in communicating scientific information to diverse audiences.

    ENVS 427 - Food Systems Analysis

    This course links conceptual and practical considerations of food-system assessment and develops a base of tools for practitioners. It examines major elements of the assessment process: systems thinking and conceptual frameworks; the food system from consumer and producer perspectives; identifying leverage points that might be influenced to affect positive change. Outcomes: Students will understand interrelationships among environment, food supply, markets, American diets, and health, learn to analyze assessment methods for food-system sectors, and examine conceptual frameworks for food-system analysis.

Courses in Sustainable Society and Business

    ENVS 427 - Food Systems Analysis

    This course links conceptual and practical considerations of food-system assessment and develop a base of tools for practitioners. It examines major elements of the assessment process: systems thinking and conceptual frameworks; the food system from consumer and producer perspectives; identifying leverage points that might be influenced to affect positive change. Outcomes: Students will understand interrelationships among environment, food supply, markets, American diets, and health, learn to analyze assessment methods for food-system sectors, and examine conceptual frameworks for food-system analysis.

    ENVS 435 - Ecological Economics

    Ecological Economics is a transdisciplinary course that takes a systems approach to the relationship between planetary stewardship, social justice, and the economy to design a prosperous and desirable future for humans on a finite planet. Ecological economics fuses economic theory and sustainability science to generate new solutions for today’s challenges. Outcomes: Understanding of ecological economics history, conceptual foundations, principles, tools, indicators, and applications. Topics include sustainable scale, just distribution, efficient allocation and relationships between economic.

    ENVS 451 - Introduction to Sustainability Concepts & Impacts (online)

    Required first course in sequence. This course examines the environmental, economic, social and political impacts of sustainable practices on the general public and global and local organizations. Students will gain an understanding of the importance to corporations and other entities of measuring, monitoring, and reporting resource use to customers and stakeholders. This course teaches students how to interpret the basic concepts of sustainability and how they relate to the operations and goals of institutions and organizations. Students will see how the interaction of social, economic, and ecological systems influence sustainability challenges and solutions.

    ENVS 452 - Assessment & Reporting l – Energy, Air, Buildings & Transportation (online)

    This course provides the fundamental concepts and methodology of measuring and reporting environmental sustainability impacts in the areas of energy, air, buildings, and transportation. Students will learn to assess and report sustainability metrics related to energy, air, buildings, and transportation. ENVS 451 prerequisite.

    ENVS 453 - Assessment & Reporting ll – Water, Land, Food & Waste (online)

    This course provides the fundamental concepts and methodology of measuring and reporting environmental sustainability impacts in the areas of water, land, food, and waste. Students will learn about the environmental and social impacts of water use and sources, land use practices, food sourcing and production, and waste production and recovery. Students will learn to assess and report sustainability metrics related to water, land, food, and waste. ENVS 451 prerequisite.

Upon Prior Approval Only

    ENVS 491 - Independent Environmental Research

    Students may register for independent research on a topic mutually acceptable to the student and any professor in the department. Usually this research is directed to a particular course or to the research of the professor.

    ENVS 498 - Special Topics

    Specific titles and contents vary from semester to semester. Variable credit hours.

    ENVS 498L - Special Topics with Lab

    Specific titles and contents vary from semester to semester. Includes a lab component. Variable credit hours.

    ENVS 499 – Directed Readings

    Directed by an IES faculty member, students will read, analyze, and discuss publications focusing on different aspects of a specific environmental issue or theme. Outcomes: Students will demonstrate comprehension of, and the ability to apply information from scientific literature and be able to synthesize information to produce a cogent, synthetic analysis of their topic based on these readings.