Loyola University Chicago

Institute of Environmental Sustainability

Spring 2018 Special Course Offerings

Introduction to different environmental professions and the skills and personality traits best suited for those professions. Students will begin to think about what area of the profession they may want to pursue and will begin developing a network in the profession. This will allow students to intentionally select appropriate internships, elective courses, and class projects that will enhance their knowledge, skills, and experience in their chosen field.

Instructor

Dr. Ping Jing

Time

Thursdays
4:00  p.m.-5:15 p.m.

Location

IES 111

Requirements

This course introduces the properties, functions, and conservation of soil. Topics include belowground ecosystem services, soil biodiversity, biogeochemical cycles, and conservation, human impacts to soils, and the socioeconomic implications of soil degradation.  Lectures, laboratory/field soil testing, field trips, and presentations by experts in sustainable soil management are employed.

Instructor
Dr. Theresa Johnston

Time
TTH: 1-2:15 p.m.

Location
IES 218 on T
IES 217 on TH

Requirements
ENVS 137 or UCSF 137 or BIOL 101
(Soil Ecology for ENVS majors only)

This course introduces students to basic principles and knowledge to explain climate change. Students will learn about natural and anthropogenic causes of climate change, the interactions between earth-atmosphere-ocean systems, climate feedback mechanisms, and impacts of climate change on the natural physical environment. (Section 004 with Dr. Jing for ENVS majors only!)

Instructor
Dr. Ping Jing

Time
TTh 11:30 a.m. -12:45 p.m.
(Section 004 time listed)

Location
Crown Center 103

Requirements
Prerequisite: ENVS 137 or UCSF 137 or BIOL 101
Section 004 is for ENVS Majors Only

 

‌This introduction to environmental law surveys some critical federal environmental statutes, rules, and regulations in the United States; important case law decided under those statutes; interaction between federal, state, and local jurisdictions; and impacts on air, land, water, and natural resources.

Outcomes:

  • Understand forces that have led to people of different race and class being differentially affected by environmental benefits and burdens.
  • Understand strategies for addressing environmental injustices.
Instructor
Mr. David Sargent
Time
TBA
Location
Online
Requirements
Sophomore, Junior or Senior standing only

Ecological Economics is a transdisciplinary course that takes a systems approach to the relationship between planetary stewardship, social justice, and the economy to design a prosperous and desirable future for humans on a finite planet. Ecological economics fuses economic theory and sustainability science to generate new solutions for today’s challenges.

Learning Outcome:

  • Understanding of ecological economics history, conceptual foundations, principles, tools, indicators, and applications. Topics include sustainable scale, just distribution, efficient allocation and relationships between economic and ecological systems.

Instructor
Dr. Max Melstrom

 Time
 MWF: 10:25 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. 

Location
IES 110
Requirements
ECON 201 & 202

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a mapping tool that allows users to create interactive searches, analyze spatial information, edit data and maps, and present the results visually. The course includes lecture, laboratory, and project components. Students will learn basic GIS skills and applications and work on projects with community organizations. (two sections are being offered!)

Instructor
Mike Ribant

Time

W: 4:15 p.m.-6:45 p.m.
or
TTH: 10 a.m. -11:15 a.m.

Location

Crown Center 103

Requirements
This course is intended for upper-division
undergraduates (junior/senior) and graduate students.

 

‌This course will provide information on how pollutants affect ecosystems and how we might ameliorate their negative effects in our world. The emphasis will be the fate and effects of pollutants in the ecosystem. The effects will be from molecular level to individual organism, community, and ecosystem levels.

Learning Outcome:

  • This course will provide students with scientific knowledge in the cause and effects of pollutants in ecosystems.
  • This course will prepare students for graduate study and a future career in ecotoxicology.
Instructor
Dr. Tham Hoang
Time
TuTh: 2:30 p.m.-3:45 p.m.
Location
Cuneo 103
Requirements
BIOL 265, CHEM 312, or ENVS 280

STEP—Climate Action reviews the environmental, political, economic, historical, and cultural contexts of climate change, arguably society’s most critical challenge. It examines actions occurring at varying geographic scales to mitigate and/or adapt to climate change impacts. The course assumes students’ familiarity with foundational climate science. Students will grapple with how to invest resources effectively to deal with a changing climate and its consequences. In addition to analyzing the strengths and limitations of various climate actions from an interdisciplinary perspective, you will participate in a hands-on, team-based project in which you and your peers design and implement locally a solution to address climate change.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will be able to assess strengths and limitations of actions to mitigate and/or adapt to climate change from an interdisciplinary perspective.
  • Students will be able to actualize a practical solution addressing climate change through collective action.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate skills essential for working in the sustainability field: critical and creative thinking, communication, collaboration, problem solving, project management, and leadership.

Fulfills Engaged Learning

Instructor
Dr. Tania Schusler
 

Time
Lecture – Mo 11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.
Lab – Mo 1:00 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. OR We 1:00 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Location
IES 111

Requirements
ENVS 224; must take ENVS 398-01E or ENVS 398-02E and ENVS 398-03E concurrently

‌This course explores resource conservation issues using economic principles. Topics include the debate between preservation and conservation of the environment; market failures in land and wildlife conservation; valuation of ecosystem services; demand for outdoor recreation; the economics of biodiversity and endangered species; efficient harvesting from mineral, forest and marine resources; and public policies addressing environmental damages from agricultural development.

Instructor
Dr. Max Melstrom
Time
MWF 12:35 p.m.-1:25 p.m.
Location
IES 110
Requirements
Junior and Senior standing only
ECON 201

The course will highlight several ongoing high-profile environmental issues, such as hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) and Lake Michigan water allocation. The course will also feature several policy experts as guest speakers to discuss the application of natural resource law and policy in practice.

Learning Outcomes:

  • A thorough understanding of the main legal concepts pertaining to natural resource management, conservation and preservation.
  • An ability to analyze and evaluate the public policy implications of various natural resource-related cases, statutes, and regulations.
  • An appreciation of the roles and responsibilities of local, state and federal agencies relating to natural resource management and environmental protection.
  • An ability to effectively advocate for environmental/natural resource laws or policies that may be important to the student.

Instructor
Mr. Brendan Dailey

Time
Mo 6:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Location
Corboy Law Center, 302
Requirements
Junior and Senior standing only

 

IES has a number of new and popular courses available during the spring semester. Consider taking one of these courses and expand your academic comfort zone with IES!

You can view all Spring 2018 Courses here.