Loyola University Chicago

Institute of Environmental Sustainability

Spring 2019 Special Course Offerings

  • 1 credit course

Gain an overview of different career paths in environmental sustainability fields, clarify your own career goals so that you can design your undergraduate experience to best prepare you, develop job searching and communication skills, and begin building a professional network.

 

InstructorTimeLocation
Dr. Tania Schusler M: 4:15 p.m.-5:30 p.m.
Cudahy Room 207
  • 3 credit course
  • This course is for ENVS majors only. Please note another ENVS 223 majors only course may not be offered until Spring 2020.

Welcome to the most exciting ecosystem on the planet! What happens when you mix the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere? Come and find out! This course introduces the properties, functions, and conservation of soil. Topics include belowground interactions, ecosystem services, soil biodiversity, biogeochemical cycles, conservation, human impacts to soils, and the socioeconomic implications of soil degradation. Lectures, laboratory/field soil testing and field trips are employed. Students will understand the methods of conservation/remediation of soils, learn how human activities affect soils and associated socioeconomic consequences, and develop analytical skills to assess soil health.

 

InstructorTimeLocationRequirements
Dr. Theresa Johnston M,W,F:1:40 p.m.-2:30 p.m. IES 217
ENVS 137 or UCSF 137 or BIOL 101
  • 3 credit course
  • This section (003) is for ENVS Majors only.

This course is designed to meet the learning objectives of ENVS major students. It will involve quantitative analysis of real climate data and energy data. It will be held in a computer lab. Students will learn and exercise computational skills using Excel spreadsheets.


This course is an introduction to the topic of climate and climate change that will address the core knowledge area of scientific literacy. Basic principles and knowledge to explain climate change will be covered, thus meeting competency b: "Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental principles, concepts, and knowledge of the sciences." Students will learn about natural and anthropogenic causes of climate change, the interactions between earth-atmosphere-ocean systems, climate feedback mechanisms, and impacts of climate change on the natural physical environment. Students will also be introduced to global climate models and techniques for detecting climate change. In the class project, students will study the climate change at the local scale in a city, including the impacts of climate change and mitigation/adaptation plans of the city.

 

InstructorTimeRequirements
Dr. Ping Jing T, Th: 11:30 a.m. -12:45 p.m. Prerequisite: ENVS 137 or UCSF 137 or BIOL 101
  • 3 credit course
  • This course counts for the Engaged Learning Requirement

This course introduces students to fundamental physics concepts including energy, power, and laws of thermodynamics. This course provides students with the opportunity to assess the current state of national and global energy usage, its impacts on society and the environment, and possible avenues for addressing these impacts. Students are required to conduct an Engaged Learning Project in which they learn to assess a building's energy performance.

 

InstructorTimeLocationRequirements
Dr. Ping Jing T, Th: 2:30 p.m.-3:45 p.m. Cuneo Hall 202 UCSF 137 or ENVS 137
  • 3 credit course

Learn how industrial ecology attempts to mimic the energy and material flows of natural ecosystems on the scale of industrial systems, including company operations and product design. Learn about closed loops, industrial symbiosis, industrial metabolism, design for the environment, and life cycle assessment.

 

InstructorTimeLocationRequirements
Dr. Nancy Landrum Tu,Th: 1:00 p.m.-2:15 p.m. Cuneo Hall 202 ENVS 363
  • 3 credit course
  • Writing Intensive

This writing-intensive course surveys the familiar ground of the history of the United States from pre-colonial times to the present, but from the perhaps unfamiliar vantage of environmental history. Our questions include the following:

  • Why were diseases and livestock more important than christianity and guns in the settlement of North America?
  • How did we kill off the passenger pigeon?
  • Why do so many Indians hate national parks?  Why did white environmentalists once hate Indians, but now love them?
  • What did environmentalists in the 1970s think a sustainable society would look like?
  • Why are the air and water cleaner now than when your parents were born?
  • Was the unabomber an environmentalist?
  • Is there hope that we can solve the climate change crisis?

All of these questions and more will be answered in this ground-level romp through United States history.

 

InstructorTimeLocation
Dr. Benjamin Johnson MWF: 11:30-12:20 p.m. IES 110
  • 3 credit course

Using case studies from the news (such as plastics, perfluorinated (Teflon) chemicals, and fracking), this course will introduce you to the tools that public health uses to decide whether something is "safe." Toxicology is the evaluation of potentially toxic substances in controlled experiments, while epidemiology compares the health of people and wildlife as they are exposed in their everyday lives. With environmental health traditionally the focus is on cancer, birth defects, and acute effects, we will emphasize novel endpoints like metabolic, reproductive, neurological, and immunological changes that can follow low-dose exposures.  A portion of the semester will be devoted to emerging solutions, such as green chemistry. 


This course fulfills:

  • 200-level elective [all IES majors]
  • scientific background & perspective [ENVS-MINR]
  • environmental/ecological sciences [ENVA-MINR]
InstructorTimeLocationRequirements
Dr. Sasha Adkins T,Th: 10:00 a.m.-11:15 a.m. IES 111 UCSF 137, ENVS 137 or BIOL 101
  •  3 credit course

This course explores natural resource conservation issues using economic principles. Topics include techniques to value the environment; oil and gas extraction and fracking; sustainable renewable resource management; the economics of biodiversity and endangered species; policies to promote conservation in agriculture, and sustainable development. Students will learn how to simulate and solve resource management problems using Excel.

This course fulfills:

  • Society, Ethics & Justice [all IES Majors]
  • Policy, Economics & Resource Management [all IES Majors]
  • Public Health & Society [ESPH-BS, EVPH-BS]
  • 300-level elective [ESTD-BA, EVST-BA]
  • Policy, Business & Society [ENVS-MINR]
  • Policy, Leadership & Action [ENVA-MINR]
InstructorTimeLocationRequirements
Dr. Max Melstrom
MWF: 10:25 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.  Life Science Building-Room 212
  • Junior or Senior standing recommended
  • ECON 201
  • 3 credit course

Land is a scarce resource, triggering conflict and competition over possessing, using, developing, and conserving it.  This course will introduce the legal underpinnings of United States land use law, including the United States Constitution, planning policies, zoning ordinances, and court opinions.  We will cover specific topics where land use and environmental issues intersect.  This course is designed to give you a basic understanding of the legal and civic framework used to regulate land use at various levels of government.​


This course fulfills:

  • Society, Ethics & Justice [all IES majors]
  • Policy, Economics & Resource Management [all IES Majors]
  • Public Health & Society [ESPH-BS, EVPH-BS]
  • 300-level elective [ESTD-BA, EVST-BA]
  • Policy, Business & Society [ENVS-MINR]
  • Policy, Leadership & Action [ENVA-MINR]
InstructorTimeLocationRequirements
Ms. Jennifer Burke Tu: 4:15 p.m.-6:45 p.m. Corboy Law Center, Room 323
  • Junior or Senior standing
 

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a mapping tool that allows users to create interactive searches, analyze spatial information, edit data and maps, and present the results visually. The course includes lecture, laboratory, and project components.


This course fulfills:

  • 300-level elective [all IES Majors]
  • Methods & Analysis [EVST-BA, EVPL-BA]
  • Methods & Application [ENVS-MINR]
  • Application[ENVA-MINR]
InstructorRequirements
Dr. Mike Ribant 
  • ENVS 380, Instructor Permission
  • 3 credit courses
  • Each of these courses are eight weeks
  • These courses are online and are courses 3 and 4 of our four course sustainability sequence

ENVS 398/498-005: Assessment Reporting II--Water, Land, Food, Waste with Mr. Jonah Smith

This online course introduces students to the importance of measuring and tracking sustainability indicators in water, land, food and waste. The course will focus on the role of the resource indicators in meeting an organization’s sustainability goals. Students will learn best-practices for creating baseline measurements and will practice calculating trends and setting future goals for each indicator area. Students will understand internal and external verification processes and standards that influence operational and sustainability choices.
(Prereq ENVS 398 Introduction to Sustainability Concepts and Impacts) 

 

ENVS 398/498-006: Sustainability Plan Development & Reporting with Mr. Aaron Durnbaugh

This online capstone course will allow students to use the skills and information gained in the previous three courses to create a comprehensive sustainability plan for an organization. Students will study sustainability goals and plans of global and local companies and apply the strategies learned to their own plans. Students will understand the importance of engaging stakeholders in advancing corporate sustainability and the role a good sustainability plan plays in that engagement. (Prereqs ENVS 398 - Introduction to Sustainability Concepts and Impacts, ENVS 398 - Assessment and Reporting I and ENVS 398 – Assessment and Reporting II)

IES has a number of new and popular courses available during the spring semester, including major-only sections, our popular career-series seminar, and writing-intensive classes. Consider taking a class with IES.

You can view all Spring 2019 Courses here.