Presidential Inauguration

On Friday, November 4, 2016, Loyola University Chicago celebrated the inauguration of Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD, as the University’s 24th president. The theme for Dr. Rooney’s inauguration was “Building a More Just, Humane, and Sustainable World.” Read more

Recap of the day’s events Watch

Procession to Presidential InaugurationWatch

Installation ceremony Watch

Dr. Rooney’s inaugural address Watch Read

A sterling symbol

This sterling silver medallion and chain is the official symbol of the president of Loyola University Chicago. The names of the first 21 presidents are engraved on the back of the medallion; the other presidents are listed individually on the back of each round link. The center link—directly above the medallion—is reserved for the current president.

President’s Medallion: Meet the 14 students honored for their work. More

A presidential timeline

Twenty-four presidents have guided Loyola University Chicago since its founding in 1870 as St. Ignatius College. Here are some highlights of each administration.

Arnold Damen, S.J.

Founder & 1st President

1870-72 Father Damen founded St. Ignatius College, the predecessor of Loyola University Chicago, on the city’s West Side in 1870. As the school’s first president, he oversaw a faculty of four priests and a student body of 37 young men.

Ferdinand Coosemans, S.J.

2nd President

1872-74 Before coming to Chicago, Father Coosemans served as the president of St. Louis University for three years. The first degree in St. Ignatius College’s history—a master of arts awarded on June 25, 1873—came during his tenure.

John DeBlieck, S.J.

3rd President

1874-77 A philosopher who challenged the status quo, Father DeBlieck was a renowned missionary and three-time university president. During his time in Chicago, he presided over St. Ignatius College’s first graduating class of seven men.

Thomas Miles, S.J.

4th President

1877-80 Father Miles, a member of a prominent Kentucky family, had a short but distinguished career in Chicago. Among his highlights: creating the St. Cecilia Choral Society and introducing a scientific course leading to a bachelor of science degree.

Thomas O’Neil, S.J.

5th President

1880-84 A gifted administrator, Father O’Neil increased enrollment by more than 30 percent during his tenure—from 203 to 265 students. After his stint in Chicago, he returned to Missouri to train new Jesuits and serve as a seminary rector.

Joseph Zealand, S.J.

6th President

1884-87 As a young Jesuit, he traveled with Father Damen—the founder of St. Ignatius College—on a far-reaching missionary tour. In Chicago, he helped drive the college’s enrollment above 300 for the first time.

Edward Higgins, S.J.

7th President

1887-91 Father Higgins had a storied career as an educator and administrator before coming to Chicago. At St. Ignatius, he started the athletic association and helped expand the school’s library to more than 5,000 volumes.

Thomas Fitzgerald, S.J.

8th President

1891-94 He left Ireland with his family as a young boy and settled in Chicago, eventually joining Father Damen’s Holy Family Parish. During his time at St. Ignatius, the college established a scientific academy and started a camera club.

James Hoeffer, S.J.

9th President

1894-98 An enthusiastic administrator—and a huge proponent of rallying graduates around their alma mater—Father Hoeffer launched the school’s alumni association. In 1895, he oversaw the school’s silver jubilee celebration.

John Pahls, S.J.

10th President

1898-1900 Father Pahls joined the Society of Jesus after becoming disenchanted with his career in business. Although only at St. Ignatius College for two years, he was a conscientious administrator and leader.

Henry Dumbach, S.J.

11th President

1900-08 He was a talented student from a young age and entered the Jesuit Novitiate of St. Stanislaus at 17. Father Dumbach formed the College of Arts & Sciences and purchased 19 acres of land in Rogers Park that would become the Lake Shore Campus.

Alexander Burrowes, S.J.

12th President

1908-12 Father Burrowes opened the college’s first professional schools, the School of Law and the School of Medicine. One year after taking office, he acquired a new state charter that officially turned St. Ignatius College into Loyola University on October 23, 1909.

John Mathery, S.J.

13th President

1912-15 After immigrating from France, Father Mathery joined the Jesuits at 18. He had an impactful presidency at the University, welcoming the first female students to campus and starting the School of Social Work and Loyola University Press.

John Furay, S.J.

14th President

1915-21 A tireless worker, Father Furay encouraged students to develop strong work habits as well. He established the University’s Summer School Program and the Correspondence Study Division to meet the needs of servicemen, housewives, and the blind.

William Agnew, S.J.

15th President

1921-27 He started his career in academia as a physics teacher before becoming an impactful administrator. During his term in office, Father Agnew established Loyola’s dental and business schools, as well as the Graduate School.

Robert Kelley, S.J.

16th President

1927-33 Before coming to Chicago, Father Kelley served as president of Regis College for six years. At Loyola, he oversaw the building of the Elizabeth M. Cudahy Library and created the intramural athletics program.

Samuel Wilson, S.J.

17th President

1933-42 Father Wilson began his career at Loyola as a history professor before becoming the department’s chairman and eventually, the University’s president. The School of Nursing and Madonna della Strada Chapel opened their doors during his tenure.

Joseph Egan, S.J.

18th President

1942-45 His time at Loyola was challenged by World War II, which severely restricted enrollment. But despite the circumstances, he conferred 150 degrees in December 1943, most of which were for medical school graduates.

James Hussey, S.J.

19th President

1945-55 Father Hussey’s 10-year presidency at Loyola transformed the school both physically and academically. During his tenure the school acquired Lewis Towers and a three-story building on Pearson Street, marking the beginning of the Water Tower Campus.

James Maguire, S.J.

20th President

1955-70 Father Maguire oversaw a period of massive growth at Loyola, turning it into one of the largest Catholic universities in the country. The Rome Center, the Institute of Pastoral Studies, and the medical center were all established during his tenure.

Raymond Baumhart, S.J.

21st President

1970-93 A Chicago native, Father Baumhart fought in the U.S. Navy during World War II. His 23-year presidency at Loyola was profound and far-reaching: full-time faculty doubled; library volumes nearly tripled; and the endowment rose from $20 million to more than $400 million.

John Piderit, S.J.

22nd President

1993-2001 Father Piderit launched the Loyola Experience to help students grow and develop through academic, social, and service opportunities. The University also received a Phi Beta Kappa honor society chapter and celebrated its 125th anniversary during his tenure.

Michael Garanzini, S.J.

23rd President

2001-15 Under Father Garanzini enrollment soared, finances stabilized, and construction boomed—and Loyola was transformed into one of the top universities in the country. Today, he is the University’s chancellor.

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD

24th President

2016 The first lay leader in Loyola’s 146-year history, Dr. Rooney brings a wealth of experience to her new position. Before joining the University, she served as president of two colleges, worked for the Department of Defense, and was a managing director of Huron Consulting.

A presidential timeline

Twenty-four presidents have guided Loyola University Chicago since its founding in 1870 as St. Ignatius College. Here are some highlights of each administration.

Arnold Damen, S.J.

Founder & 1st President

1870-72 Father Damen founded St. Ignatius College, the predecessor of Loyola University Chicago, on the city’s West Side in 1870. As the school’s first president, he oversaw a faculty of four priests and a student body of 37 young men.

Ferdinand Coosemans, S.J.

2nd President

1872-74 Before coming to Chicago, Father Coosemans served as the president of St. Louis University for three years. The first degree in St. Ignatius College’s history—a master of arts awarded on June 25, 1873—came during his tenure.

John DeBlieck, S.J.

3rd President

1874-77 A philosopher who challenged the status quo, Father DeBlieck was a renowned missionary and three-time university president. During his time in Chicago, he presided over St. Ignatius College’s first graduating class of seven men.

Thomas Miles, S.J.

4th President

1877-80 Father Miles, a member of a prominent Kentucky family, had a short but distinguished career in Chicago. Among his highlights: creating the St. Cecilia Choral Society and introducing a scientific course leading to a bachelor of science degree.

Thomas O’Neil, S.J.

5th President

1880-84 A gifted administrator, Father O’Neil increased enrollment by more than 30 percent during his tenure—from 203 to 265 students. After his stint in Chicago, he returned to Missouri to train new Jesuits and serve as a seminary rector.

Joseph Zealand, S.J.

6th President

1884-87 As a young Jesuit, he traveled with Father Damen—the founder of St. Ignatius College—on a far-reaching missionary tour. In Chicago, he helped drive the college’s enrollment above 300 for the first time.

Edward Higgins, S.J.

7th President

1887-91 Father Higgins had a storied career as an educator and administrator before coming to Chicago. At St. Ignatius, he started the athletic association and helped expand the school’s library to more than 5,000 volumes.

Thomas Fitzgerald, S.J.

8th President

1891-94 He left Ireland with his family as a young boy and settled in Chicago, eventually joining Father Damen’s Holy Family Parish. During his time at St. Ignatius, the college established a scientific academy and started a camera club.

James Hoeffer, S.J.

9th President

1894-98 An enthusiastic administrator—and a huge proponent of rallying graduates around their alma mater—Father Hoeffer launched the school’s alumni association. In 1895, he oversaw the school’s silver jubilee celebration.

John Pahls, S.J.

10th President

1898-1900 Father Pahls joined the Society of Jesus after becoming disenchanted with his career in business. Although only at St. Ignatius College for two years, he was a conscientious administrator and leader.

Henry Dumbach, S.J.

11th President

1900-08 He was a talented student from a young age and entered the Jesuit Novitiate of St. Stanislaus at 17. Father Dumbach formed the College of Arts & Sciences and purchased 19 acres of land in Rogers Park that would become the Lake Shore Campus.

Alexander Burrowes, S.J.

12th President

1908-12 Father Burrowes opened the college’s first professional schools, the School of Law and the School of Medicine. One year after taking office, he acquired a new state charter that officially turned St. Ignatius College into Loyola University on October 23, 1909.

John Mathery, S.J.

13th President

1912-15 After immigrating from France, Father Mathery joined the Jesuits at 18. He had an impactful presidency at the University, welcoming the first female students to campus and starting the School of Social Work and Loyola University Press.

John Furay, S.J.

14th President

1915-21 A tireless worker, Father Furay encouraged students to develop strong work habits as well. He established the University’s Summer School Program and the Correspondence Study Division to meet the needs of servicemen, housewives, and the blind.

William Agnew, S.J.

15th President

1921-27 He started his career in academia as a physics teacher before becoming an impactful administrator. During his term in office, Father Agnew established Loyola’s dental and business schools, as well as the Graduate School.

Robert Kelley, S.J.

16th President

1927-33 Before coming to Chicago, Father Kelley served as president of Regis College for six years. At Loyola, he oversaw the building of the Elizabeth M. Cudahy Library and created the intramural athletics program.

Samuel Wilson, S.J.

17th President

1933-42 Father Wilson began his career at Loyola as a history professor before becoming the department’s chairman and eventually, the University’s president. The School of Nursing and Madonna della Strada Chapel opened their doors during his tenure.

Joseph Egan, S.J.

18th President

1942-45 His time at Loyola was challenged by World War II, which severely restricted enrollment. But despite the circumstances, he conferred 150 degrees in December 1943, most of which were for medical school graduates.

James Hussey, S.J.

19th President

1945-55 Father Hussey’s 10-year presidency at Loyola transformed the school both physically and academically. During his tenure the school acquired Lewis Towers and a three-story building on Pearson Street, marking the beginning of the Water Tower Campus.

James Maguire, S.J.

20th President

1955-70 Father Maguire oversaw a period of massive growth at Loyola, turning it into one of the largest Catholic universities in the country. The Rome Center, the Institute of Pastoral Studies, and the medical center were all established during his tenure.

Raymond Baumhart, S.J.

21st President

1970-93 A Chicago native, Father Baumhart fought in the U.S. Navy during World War II. His 23-year presidency at Loyola was profound and far-reaching: full-time faculty doubled; library volumes nearly tripled; and the endowment rose from $20 million to more than $400 million.

John Piderit, S.J.

22nd President

1993-2001 Father Piderit launched the Loyola Experience to help students grow and develop through academic, social, and service opportunities. The University also received a Phi Beta Kappa honor society chapter and celebrated its 125th anniversary during his tenure.

Michael Garanzini, S.J.

23rd President

2001-15 Under Father Garanzini enrollment soared, finances stabilized, and construction boomed—and Loyola was transformed into one of the top universities in the country. Today, he is the University’s chancellor.

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD

24th President

2016 The first lay leader in Loyola’s 146-year history, Dr. Rooney brings a wealth of experience to her new position. Before joining the University, she served as president of two colleges, worked for the Department of Defense, and was a managing director of Huron Consulting.

A weekend full of events

Missioning Mass, 10-11 a.m., Madonna della Strada Chapel

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD, was officially missioned with the presidency of Loyola University Chicago by members of the Society of Jesus.
View the Missioning Mass Program (PDF).

Inaugural Procession, 1:30-2 p.m., Arnold J. Damen, S.J., Statue




The inaugural procession kicked off at the statue of Arnold J. Damen, S.J. The procession wound through campus and through the symbolic south doors of the Cudahy Library.

Installation Ceremony, 2-3 p.m., Gentile Arena






Dr. Rooney was formally invested with the presidency of Loyola University Chicago. The event featured an academic procession and a keynote address by Dr. Rooney.
View the Installation Ceremony Program (PDF).
Read Dr. Rooney’s Inaugural Address (PDF).

Community Reception, 3-5 p.m., Arnold J. Damen, S.J., Student Center







After the installation ceremony, a community reception was held in the Arnold J. Damen, S.J., Student Center.

President’s Ball, 8 p.m.-midnight, Navy Pier






The inaugural day’s events culminated in the President’s Ball. The President’s Medallions were awarded to Loyola’s most outstanding students at the ball.
View the President’s Ball program (PDF).

Service Day, November 5, 1-3 p.m., Rambler Room

As part of Ignatian Heritage Month and Dr. Rooney’s Inauguration, members of the Loyola Community participated in a day of service on Saturday, November 5. Volunteers gathered on the Lake Shore Campus to package meals for Stop Hunger Now, an international hunger relief organization. The team of over 100 students, faculty, staff, alumni, and Dr. Rooney—along with members of her family—together packaged over 21,800 meals.

Academic delegates

Over 70 Academic Institutions sent a delegate to the Inauguration including representatives from Loyola's fellow 27 Jesuit colleges and universities as well as delegates from the U.S., Canada, Great Britain, and Spain.

Moravian College, 1742

Jan Gollins, Delegate

Georgetown University, 1789

Dr. Jeanne Lord, PhD, Associate Vice President & Dean of Students

Mount St. Mary’s University, 1808

Matthew Thibeau, Director, Strategic Planning and Initiatives

Saint Louis University, 1818

Leonard McKinnis, Delegate

Spring Hill College, 1830

James McKinney, Former Chair of Spring Hill College Board of Trustees

Xavier University, 1831

Aaron Meis, Vice President of Enrollment Management

Boston University, 1839

Elisabeth McCombe, Alumna

Loras College, 1839

Dr. Daniel Allen Jr., PhD, Alumnus

Fordham University, 1841

Patti Heller, Delegate

University of Notre Dame, 1842

James Harrington, Alumnus

Villanova University, 1842

Nancy Lane, Alumnus

Clarke University, 1843,

Sr. Margaret Mary Cosgrove, BVM (MUND ’70), Trustee Emerita

MacMurray College, 1846

Karin Zosel, JD, Vice President for Institutional Advancement & Planning

Saint Vincent College, 1846,

Christopher P. Weiss, Alumnus

Saint Xavier University, 1846

Joan Knox, Associate Vice President of University and Community Relations

Saint Mary’s University, Twickenham, 1850

Chris Kerzich, Director of Americas and Canada and Global Catholic Engagement

University of Dayton, 1850

William M. Fischer, JD, Vice President for Student Development

Northwestern University, 1851

Robert Avery, Representative of the Alumni Regent Group

Saint Joseph’s University, 1851

Dr. Cary Anderson (MA ’92), Vice President for Student Life/Associate Provost

Loyola University Maryland, 1852

Dr. Sheilah Shaw Horton, PhD, Vice President for Student Development

University of San Francisco, 1855

Dr. Derek Truesdale, EdD, Alumnus

Lake Forest College, 1857

Bill Lowry, Secretary of the Board of Trustees

Saint John’s University (MN), 1857

Michael McIntyre, Alumnus

Wheaton College, 1860

Dr. David Fletcher, Associate Professor of Philosophy

North Central College, 1861

Dr. Troy Hammond, President

Boston College, 1863

Matt Wendel, Alumnus

St. Ignatius College Prep, 1869

Rev. Lukas Laniauskas, S.J., Vice President Mission, Integration and Implementation

Canisius College, 1870

Edward McGrogan (MBA ’00), Regent

Elmhurst College, 1871

Dr. Larry A. Braskamp, Board of Trustees

Saint Peter’s University, 1872

Judith Valenti, Alumna

Regis University, 1877

Rev. John P. Fitzgibbons, S.J., PhD, President

St. Edward’s University, 1877

Charles DelGrande, Friend

Duquesne University of the Holy Spirit, 1878

Andrew Rebholz, Sr., Alumnus

Marquette University, 1881

Valerie Wilson Reed, Alumna

St. Ambrose University, 1882,

Kemper Rusteberg, Alumnus

Seton Hill University, 1885

Deana Sjolander, Alumna

University of Saint Thomas (MN), 1885

Peter Gamber, Alumnus

John Carroll University, 1886

Doug Ennis, Chicago Alumni Chapter Board President

Benedictine University, 1887,

Dr. Michael S. Brophy, President

The Catholic University of America, 1887

Rev. Peter Bernardi, S.J., Delegate

The University of Scranton, 1888

Dr. Robert Davis Jr., EdD, Chief of Staff

Columbia College Chicago, 1890

Dr. Stanley Wearden, Senior Vice President and Provost

University of Chicago, 1890

Dr. Marilyn Krogh, Loyola Faculty

North Park University, 1891

Dr. David Parkyn, PhD, President

Our Lady of the Lake University, 1895

Bionca Martin, Alumna

DePaul University, 1898

Rev. Dennis Holtschneider, CM, EdD, President

St. Norbert College, 1898

Patrick Kelly, Alumnus, Former Trustee, Loyola University Chicago

College of Saint Elizabeth, 1899

Anne Lanute, Alumna

Dominican University, 1901

Dr. Donna Carroll, PhD, President

Saint Michael’s College, 1904

Corrine O’Connor, Alumna

Loyola Academy, 1909

Rev. Patrick McGrath, S.J., President

Rockhurst University, 1910

Rev. Thomas Curran, S.J., President

Loyola Marymount University, 1911

Dr. Abbie Robinson-Armstrong, PhD, Vice President for Intercultural Affairs

Loyola University New Orleans, 1912

Kevin Poorman, University Representative

Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 1912

K. Michael Welch, MB, ChB, FRCP, President and CEO

College of Saint Benedict, 1913

Rachel Schmitt-Kaiser, Alumna

Robert Morris University, 1913

Mablene Krueger, President

Resurrection University, 1914

Dr. Douglas Geiger, (JFRC Summer ’04, PhD ’10)

Vice President of Academic Affairs

Marywood University, 1915

Elizabeth Pattara, Alumna

University of St. Francis, 1920

Dr. Arvid Johnson, PhD, President

Fontbonne University, 1923

Sr. Bernadette M. Eaton, CSJ, Alumna

Patricia Manning (MEd ’87), Alumna

Brescia University, 1925

Joshua Clary, Vice President for Student Affairs

Carlow University, 1925

Lisa Swing, Alumna

Lewis University, 1932

Dr. David Livingston, PhD, President

University of Saint Joseph, Connecticut, 1932

Kathleen Driscoll Amatangelo, Alumna

Fairfield University, 1942

Bill McIntosh, Trustee

Roosevelt University, 1945

Lois Becker, Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs

Le Moyne College, 1946

Dr. George Dengler, Alumnus

Gwynedd Mercy University, 1948

Dr. Kathleen Owens (BS ’67, PhD ’81), President

Adler University of Professional Psychology, 1952

Dr. Raymond Crossman, President

King’s University College, 1954

Dr. David Sylvester, PhD, Principal

Trinity Christian College, 1959

Kurt Dykstra, JD, President

Neumann University, 1965

Dr. Lawrence DiPaolo Jr., PhD (MA ’00, PhD ’06), Vice President for Academic Affairs

Holy Cross College, 1966

Br. John Paige, CSC, PhD, President

St. Joseph College Seminary, 1968

Very. Rev. Peter Snief, Rector-President

Cristo Rey Jesuit High School, 1996

Antonio Ortiz, President

Christ the King Jesuit College Preparatory School, 2008

Clement Martin, MA (MEd ’01), President

Universidad Loyola Andalucia, 2010

Gabriel Maria Pérez Alcalá, Rector

Francisco de Borja Martin Garrido, Director of International Relations

Greetings and citations

View citations and greetings from several institutions, each congratulating Dr. Rooney on her November 4 inauguration.

View the November 4, 2016 Presidential Inauguration Installation Program (PDF), Missioning Mass Program (PDF), and President's Ball Program (PDF).