Loyola University Chicago

- Navigation -

Loyola University Chicago

Asian Studies

Course Descriptions

Spring 2011 Courses

   Prof. Yingua Moore and Prof. Ying Peng (ASIA C01 / CHIN 101: Chinese I):
This is an introduction course to Chinese. No previous knowledge of language is assumed.
Outcome: Students will be introduced to the spoken language and the script in which majority of the native speakers write the language

   Prof. Hong Chen (ASIA C03 / CHIN 103: Chinese III):
Chinese 103 is the continuation of Chinese 102. This course further extends students knowledge of Chinese vocabulary and grammar, and improves their skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
Outcome: Students will further develop their understanding of the language and will be able to proficiently read and write.

   Staff (ASIA HU1 / HNDI 101: Hindi- Urdu I):
This course is an introduction to the two sister languages, Hindi and Urdu.  No previous knowledge of either language is assumed. It also introduces the Devanagari script in which Hindi is written.
Outcome: Students will be introduced to the spoken language and the script in which majority of the native speakers write the language

   Staff (ASIA HU3 / HNDI 103: Hindi- Urdu III):
This course is the continuation of HNDI 102. This course further extends students knowledge of Hindi/Urdu.
Outcome: Students will be able to further develop their proficiency in the language and will be able to speak, read, and write in complex sentences.

   Prof. Janet Fair (ASIA J01 / JAPN 101: Japanese I):
Students will learn the skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing in JAPN 101. This is an introduction course, no previous knowledge is assumed.  
Outcome: Students will be introduced to the spoken language and the script.

   Staff (ASIA J03 / JAPN 103: Japanese III):
This course builds on students knowledge of Japanese grammar, vocabulary, verbal routines, and cultural patterns.
Outcome: Students will learn to converse in Japanese, and further develop their proficiency in the language.

   Prof. Janet Fair (ASIA 101: Explorations in Asian Studies):
This course introduces the histories and cultures of East, Southeast, and South Asia from early modern times to the present.

   Prof. Elena Valussi and Prof. Mark Allee (ASIA 108 / HIST 108: East Asia Since 1500):
This class describes the historical development of three of the major players in East Asia: China, Japan, and Korea, from 1600 to the present. The class will start by positioning East Asia and discussing the geographical features that helped shape its social and political developments. China will get the lion share in this course, first and foremost because it developed a complex society, culture, and foreign policy much before Korea and Japan, and also because these early dev elopements deeply influenced both Japanese and Korean culture, religion, ethics, internal and foreign politics. However, we will see how, despite China's overwhelming cultural influence, modern Japan and Korea followed their own political and social development, modeling societies and states in very different ways from China, and pursued very different policies of engagement with the West. While China was at the height of its power in the early part of the modern period (1600-1800), it had troubles with modernization; its encounter with the West, together with a crumbling internal structure, brought it to a century or more of civil wars, Western invasions, Japanese occupation, finally leading to the Communist takeover. Meanwhile, Japan was slowly strengthening its role as the rising power in East Asia and engaged in confrontations with other East Asia countries and with the West. We will follow their intersecting and opposing trajectories through World War I and II, and will detail their respective economic booms and concomitant socio-political effects all the way until the present.

   Prof. Kim Searcy and Prof. Leslie Dossey (ASIA 109 / HIST 109: Survey of Islamic History):
This course will introduce the historical development of Islamic civilization and the formation of Muslim social and political institutions from the 7th century to the present.
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the historical development and diversity of Islamic beliefs, practices, and institutions in varied regional contexts and historical periods.

   Prof. David Embrick (ASIA 122 / SOCL 122: Race and Ethnic Relations):
This course examines the development of cultural, society, and self-understanding by exploring the social construction of race in the United States. The course explores how social constructions of race affect interpersonal relations, laws, policies, and practices in various and ethnic communities.
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the conditions which have worsened racial tensions as well as how social movements have been successful at eradicating racially oppressive laws and working towards a just society.

   Prof. Marcia Hermansen, Prof. Feryal Salem, and Prof. Omer Mozaffar (ASIA 195 / THEO 195: Introduction to Islam):
An introduction to the religion of Islam through the study of major religious ideas, movements, and figures prominent in the development of the tradition. The course covers three major phases: basic teachings of Islam, the articulation of the classical tradition, and contemporary developments. Major issues such as unity and diversity within Islam, Islamic government, the role of women, Muslims in America, and Islamic movements in the contemporary world will also be featured.
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Muslim scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Islam, the key Islamic concepts, terms, values, and religious practices, and the diversity within Islam in terms of secretarian, regional, and historical developments.

   Prof. Yarina Liston and Prof. Susan Zakin (ASIA 196 / THEO 196: Introduction to Hinduism):
An introduction to various dimensions of the religion that Western scholarship has labeled, "Hinduism" organized around three spiritual disciplines recognized by the Hindu tradition (action, knowledge, and devotion). Range of topics, such as concept of the person, social structure, forms of ritual, philosophical and mystical impulses, myths and images associated with the major gods and goddesses of the Hindu pantheon, devotionalism, and secretarian divisions. The religious and spiritual lives of both men and women, and of both high-caste and low-caste Hindus.
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Hindu scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Hinduism, the key Hindu concepts, terms, and values, and religious practices, and the basic narratives and imagery associated with some of the most important Hindu deities.

   Prof. Yarina Liston, Prof. Taigen Daniel Leighton, and Prof. Susan Zakin (ASIA 197 / THEO 197: Introduction to Buddhism):
The rise and development of Theravada, Mahayana, and Vajrayana forms of Buddhism in South Asia, Tibet, and East Asia. The life and teachings of the founder, Gautama, the establishment of Buddhist community, the rise of Buddhist monasticism, the spread of Buddhist ideas from India to other parts of Asia, and the development of a variety of Buddhist sects. The various texts, institutions, beliefs, and practices associated with each of the three main forms of Buddhism.
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Buddhist scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Buddhism, including its different major branches, and the key Buddhist concepts, terms values, and religious practices.

   Prof. Taigen Daniel Leighton (ASIA 199 / THEO 199: Religions of Asia): 
This course is an introductory survey of selected teachings, institutions, and practices of the great religious traditions of South Asia and East Asia placed in historical context. Materials covered will include the Hindu and Buddhist traditions of India and the traditions of China and Japan, including Daoism (Taoism), Confucianism, Shinto, and Chinese and Japanese forms of Buddhism.
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the central texts, beliefs, ethical understandings, and practices of at least three Asian religions.

   (ASIA 249: Composition & Conversation I) :

   (ASIA 297-TP: Topics in Asia- Beijing Center):
Students will gain familiarity with the topic; the ability to make connections between secondary and primary sources; and the capacity to think critically about the ways that historians have approached major issues.

   Staff (ASIA 345 / HIST 345: Reform & Revol China 1800-1949):
This course examines the state and society in China with attention to the steady transformation of society, the economy, and political life from 1800 to 1949.

   Staff (ASIA 370 / SOWK 370: Cultural Diversity):

   Prof. Kathleen Adams (ASIA 397: Topic- Relg Soc & Arts in Isl SE ASIA):
This course is a vehicle for topics of particular interest to the instructor or an issue of contemporary relevance.
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate how cultural anthropology is relevant to contemporary issues or how a problem can be structured around a cultural anthropological viewpoint.



Loyola

Asian Studies
Department of History
Crown Center, 5th Floor, 1032 W. Sheridan Road, Chicago,IL 60660 · 773.508.2238
asianstudies@luc.edu

Notice of Non-discriminatory Policy