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Loyola University Chicago

University Core

Knowledge Area: Ethics

Learning Outcome: Demonstrate ethical awareness, the ability to do ethical reflection, and the ability to apply ethical principles in decision-making.

Developing a student's ethical awareness, reflection, and decision-making ability is central to a Core Curriculum. Ethics enables a student to use specific capacities and skills to make moral decisions. Students should develop, demonstrate and act out their ethical abilities. This will occur as a student learns to recognize when situations call for ethical judgment and how to use the language and distinctions of ethics to respond ethically to those situations.

Competencies: By way of example, Loyola graduates should be able to:

Ethics Courses (1 course required)

COMM 215: Ethics and Communication**
This course introduces students to the study of the ethical choices inherently involved in every intentional act of communication.

Outcome: Students will be able to discern ethical communication issues, describe how moral principles play out in actual situations, and articulate and understand the thinking process in such matters.
PHIL 162: Social and Political Philosophy - Civic Engagement*
 This course will investigate one of the central questions of philosophy and social theory: How should we, as human beings, live together?

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the major philosophical questions in the area of social philosophy with attention to the historical and conceptual development of these questions, and be able to articulate some of the major problems and responses central to this area of philosophy.
PHIL 164: Health Care Ethics - Civic Engagement*
This course studies philosophical ethics as practiced in the health care setting. It includes a service learning experience and satisfies the civic engagement core requirement.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of traditional moral theories in a health care framework, as well as the varieties of ethical challenges facing contemporary health care.
PHIL 181: Ethics*
This course is a general introduction to ethics or moral philosophy.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of criteria for choosing between conflicting ethical theories, moral disagreement, the justification of moral judgments, and the application of ethical standards to practical decision-making and ethical questions that arise in everyday life.
PHIL 182: Social and Political Philosophy*
This course will investigate one of the central questions of philosophy and social theory: how we, as human beings, should live together. 

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the major philosophical questions in the area of social philosophy with attention to the historical and conceptual development of these questions, and be able to articulate some of the major problems and responses central to this area of philosophy.
PHIL 184: Health Care Ethics
This course studies philosophical ethics as practiced in the health care setting.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of traditional moral theories in a health care framework, as well as the varieties of ethical challenges facing contemporary health care.
PHIL 185: Business Ethics*
This course is an introduction to ethics which focuses on ethical issues in the world of business and commerce.

Outcome: Students will be able to examine and assess various ethical theories and apply those theories to ethical issues in business.
PHIL 186: Ethics and Education*
This course examines philosophical ethics as it informs and guides the activity of teaching.

Outcome: Students will be able to examine and assess various ethical theories, and apply those theories to ethical issues in teaching.
PHIL 187: Environmental Ethics*
The course will look at various philosophical and ethical views on the relationship between humans and the natural world. Topics may include: pollution, animal rights, and natural resources.

Outcome: Students will develop critical thinking skills and gain knowledge in the areas of philosophy and ethics. Students will have opportunities to analyze, evaluate, work as team members, and engage with the community on environmental topics and so will be able to engage civic and leadership activities.
THEO 182: Moral Problems: Medical Issues*
This course offers both an exploration into U.S. healthcare and medical issues, especially as they relate to racial/ethnic and socio-economic disparities. It also offers an introduction to methods in ethics. In particular, the problem of U.S. healthcare quality and access disparities serves as a primary case study which provides practice in the steps of moral deliberation and the incorporation of various ethical theories that are possible to use.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of ethical comprehension, analysis, and decision-making within the context of select theological and religious traditions.
THEO 183: Moral Problems: War and Peace*
This course provides an introduction to theological and religious ethics through attention to ethical issues regarding war and peace.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of ethical comprehension, analysis, and decision-making within the context of select theological and religious traditions.
THEO 184: Moral Problems: Ecology*
This course provides an introduction to theological and religious ethics through attention to ethical issues regarding ecology.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of ethical comprehension, analysis, and decision-making within the context of select theological and religious traditions.
THEO 185: Introduction to Christian Ethics*
This course explores the major sources, methods, and insights of Christian social and theological ethics. Particular attention is given to Roman Catholic thought.

Outcome:
Students will identify the major sources of Christian ethics (Scripture, Church tradition, philosophy, the social and human sciences, and human experience), and gain practice in identifying how different thinkers use, interpret, and prioritize these sources.
THEO 186: Introduction to Religious Ethics*
This course explores fundamental moral sources and methods in Christian ethics in dialogue with the ethical understandings of at least two religious traditions. In doing so, it explores moral issues faced by individuals and communities from theological perspectives, particularly mindful of how the economic, political and cultural structures in a religiously plural world affect those issues.

Outcome:
In this course, students will explore and compare the ethical understandings of Christianity and at least one other religious tradition.  With respect to each tradition, students will learn about the foundational sources, doctrines and questions that guide its ethical thinking.
THEO 192: Moral Problems*
This variable topics course provides an introduction to theological and religious ethics through attention to a select number of moral problems.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of ethical comprehension, analysis, and decision-making within the context of select theological and religious traditions.

*This course will satisfy both the Ethics requirement and the relevant Knowledge Area (i.e., either Philosophical or Theological and Religious Studies).

**This course satisfies the Ethics requirement but satisfies the Philosophical Knowledge Area requirement only for students in the School of Communication.

Loyola

University Core Curriculum Committee · 1032 W. Sheridan Road · Chicago, IL 60660

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