English 393 and Honors 290 are restricted to second-semester freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. In addition to the orientation and the tutoring, these students meet twice a month at 5:45 p.m. for about 50-60 minutes for a total of 5 class meetings. These meetings give tutors a chance to ask questions, compare experiences, and discuss assigned readings and  paper topics. We also have presentations of topics which are of interest and concern to the students. Those students taking the course for 3 credit hours and the Core Engaged Learning-Service Learning Internship requirement will have an additional 6th meeting and a book review.  These are self–managed courses. A student has some flexibility in deciding which meeting to attend, because each meeting takes place twice.

Class meetings - Please see the Syllabus on this website or on Sakai

Note: All activities, including class meetings, take place in the classroom assigned in LOCUS. Please note that the FIRST REQUIREMENT is the orientation session a student must attend if he or she has never tutored at the Literacy Center before. Please check the main page of the website for the orientation schedule. The five meetings required of all registered students and the sixth meeting for 3 credit hour Core students take place at 5:45 pm before tutoring begins, with each meeting being offered on two separate days.  A student chooses one of the two.  If a student has an evening class and cannot attend the required scheduled class meetings, she or he should contact the instructor in order to arrange another time to meet. The course is taught by Ms. Jacqueline Heckman, Director, LCLC.  The class meetings as the tutoring sessions are all required and must be made up if any session or meeting is missed.   If a student misses a meeting or tutoring session without making up the absence, the final grade will be lowered (see the grading requirements on the syllabus).

For 1 hour of credit (Engl 393 only) you agree to:

(1). Attend the orientation program if you are a learner new to the Center.  Tutor one night each week for the semester.  You agree to arrive before 7 p.m. one night each week and to tutor, to observe and report, or to undertake other volunteer duties for the evening as needed (filing, typing, sorting books, etc.) as requested by the managers.  You agree to make up any evening of tutoring that you miss because of your absence. 

(2). Attend the five bimonthly 5:45 class meetings and complete all the reading assignments in the textbook as well as the assigned research articles.

(3). Write all the papers outlined on the syllabus (10 journals and 5 writing assignments).  Your final assignment will be either a project description or a paper.  If you are doing a project with the Director’s permission, your final Writing Assignment (# 5) will be a one page report on the project’s completion.  If you are doing a paper, your final Writing Assignment (# 5) will be approximately 3-4 pages, will include some research, and will be submitted either to the instructor or on Sakai and also posted to Turnitin. 

For 2 hours of credit (Engl 393 only) you agree to:

(1). Attend the orientation program if you are a learner new to the Center.  Tutor two nights each week for the semester.  You agree to arrive before 7 p.m. two nights each week and to tutor, to observe and report, or to undertake other volunteer duties for the evening as needed (filing, typing, sorting books, etc.) as requested by the managers.  You agree to make up any evening of tutoring that you miss because of your absence. 

(2). Attend the five bimonthly 5:45 class meetings and complete all the reading assignments in the textbook as well as the assigned research articles.

(3). Write all the papers outlined on the syllabus (10 journals and 5 writing assignments).  Your final assignment will be either a project description or a paper.  If you are doing a project with the Director’s permission, your final Writing Assignment (# 5) will be a one page report on the project’s completion.  If you are doing a paper, your final Writing Assignment (# 5) will be approximately 5-6 pages, will include some research, and will be submitted either to the instructor or on Sakai and also posted to Turnitin. 

For 3 hours of credit (English 393 and Honors 290) and to satisfy the Core Engaged Learning-Service Learning Internship requirement, you agree to:

(1). Attend the orientation program if you are a learner new to the Center.  Tutor two nights each week for the semester.  You agree to arrive before 7 p.m. two nights each week and to tutor, to observe and report, or to undertake other volunteer duties for the evening as needed (filing, typing, sorting books, etc.) as requested by the managers.  You agree to make up any evening of tutoring that you miss because of your absence. 

(2). Attend the five bimonthly 5:45 class meetings and the additional 6th class meeting held for 3 credit-hour Core students; to complete all the reading assignments in the textbook as well as the assigned research articles. 

(3). Write all the papers outlined on the syllabus (10 journals and 5 writing assignments).  Your final assignment will be either a project description or a paper.  If you are doing a project with the Director’s permission, your final Writing Assignment (# 5) will be a one page report on the project’s completion.  If you are doing a paper, your final Writing Assignment (# 5) will be approximately 9-10 pages, will include some research, and will be submitted either to the instructor or on Sakai and also posted to Turnitin. 

(4). Complete an additional reading assignment, a text chosen from the suggested course supplementary reading list or another text to be approved by the instructor related to any of your experiences at the Center:  second language acquisition, adult education, adult literacy, specific language skill areas (pronunciation, reading, writing, grammar), immigration, refugee issues,  sociolinguistics, culture....  Prepare a 2  page review of the book.  Your book review will include an objective  statement of the purpose/audience/thesis of the book, a very short summary as well as an analysis of the content, and then a subjective section discussing your evaluation of the text as well as an assessment of how it relates to your experience at the Literacy Center and to your special interests.  (5).There will also be a required 6th meeting for Core students in addition to the five required class meetings for all students so that Core students can discuss these readings.

 Tutoring  Policies:  Our tutoring schedule is Monday through Thursday, 7-9:30 pm.  You are required to tutor one or two nights a week, depending on the number of credits for which you are registered.  If you are ill, you must phone the manager at 773-508-2330 or send an email to locolice@gmail.com to report that you will be absent; you must make up the tutoring session at a later date.  If your regular learner is ill and notifies you, you must still come to the Center where you will be assigned to tutor a different learner, to perform some other task for the Center (filing, typing, etc.), or to observe another tutor-learner pair.  Further instructions concerning communication via Facebook will be given to students on Sakai. 

Your tutoring will be assessed on an on-going basis primarily by the Center staff, both as you are tutoring and in terms of the records you create based on your sessions.  The staff members observe tutoring, discreetly and unobtrusively, and periodically sit in on the sessions of all of our tutors.  From time to time a manager or lead tutor will stop by your table, say hello, and sit in for 10 minutes or so. (If you were taking tennis lessons, you'd want the coach to watch you play, and if the coach watched you play, you'd expect some feedback; friendly and supportive supervision is part of what the Literacy Center offers both learners and tutors.) Other tutors may also observe working pairs in order to gain valuable insight into the tutoring process.  This is routine practice.  In addition, after each evening of tutoring, you will fill out a session report on the work you and your learner completed and suggestions/lesson plans for the following session.  Each session report from all tutoring sessions for all learner/tutor pairs are reviewed by the Center staff and the instructor  on an ongoing basis; the reports constitute very important evidence of your tutoring skills, including the regularity and reliability of your attendance; promptness; willingness to adapt to the LCLC's needs; responsiveness to staff suggestions; thoroughness; resourcefulness; and attentiveness to learner's needs. 

Attendance  Policies – rigid:  Because this is an internship/tutorial, not a regular class, you are responsible for meeting deadlines and requirements without reminders from the instructor.  You should be aware that students in this internship/tutorial sometimes fail to turn in assignments promptly, forget that they are due, fail to ask questions about the assignments before they are written, or claim not to know that this syllabus exists.  These are not encouraging signs in students who volunteer for independent learning projects.  You will be required to sign a statement, an agreement with the LCLC, specifying the credit options you wish to exercise and recognizing that meeting deadlines and course requirements is your responsibility (this statement is due at the end of the second week of the semester by email to the instructor). 

 Please note that there are no "cuts" in this course.  If you miss a tutoring session, you must make it up either by tutoring an extra night or by working for the LCLC in another capacity as our needs require. You must also notify the staff beforehand of your absence.  If you know your regularly scheduled learner is not coming, you must still come to the LCLC and be assigned another learner for the evening or be asked to perform other duties; you may be assigned to assist with administrative tasks or to observe a learner-tutor pair and write a one-page observation report.  Because there are so few class meetings, all are required; there are no allowed absences.  If a student misses a tutoring session or a class and does not initiate a make-up, the student’s final grade will be lowered by one grade level for each such absence: for example, from an A- to a B+ for one missed tutoring session or class absence not made up.

For additional information and a description of reading and writing assignment requirements, please see the course syllabus on this website.


Course Description



a. LCLC Internship in Adult Literacy: Teaching English to Adults (English 393)

The LCLC is officially connected to the curriculum of the Department of English and constitutes a major commitment to service learning in the Department. The LCLC sponsors an internship in adult literacy, English 393: Teaching English to Adults, for one, two, or three hours of credit. Interns tutor in the LCLC one or two nights (any two that they choose) each week and form the core of our tutoring staff (volunteers often prefer to tutor on one night only). The purpose of this internship is to offer students experience in teaching adults to read and write English in a program that combines tutoring adults at a literacy center with a program of reading and writing about the impact of adult literacy on the discipline of English linguistic and literary studies. For details on variable credit requirements, see the current syllabus posted on this site.

The internship is supervised by a member of the Department of English who meets regularly with the students who enroll in the course. The faculty member coordinates the students' experience at the tutoring center with the academic program of reading and writing and may also meet with the students privately each term. The internship balances direct experience in tutoring adults with research into such issues as the history of literacy programs; the nature of local, state, and national governmental support of them; the response of professional organizations in English, including the Modern Language Association (MLA) and the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) to literacy problems; and the efforts of colleges and universities to use literacy programs as means to bridge narrowly professional and wider social concerns. 

b. Honors Tutorial (Honors 290)

Students enrolled in Loyola's Honors Program may take a three–hour tutorial for honors credit (Honors 290).  The syllabus, assignments, and requirements are the same as those for students in English 393.  This course offers training and practical experience in tutoring adults in written and spoken English at the Loyola Community Literacy Center. Students tutor adult learners, some of whom are native English speakers preparing for the GED or improving their literacy skills. Other learners are immigrants or refugees whose skills in their native language range from their being highly educated professionals to being perhaps functionally illiterate, and who may know some English or no English. The Center is open M-Th evenings from 7-9:30. Students may only take the course for 3 credit hours. They must attend an orientation as well as bi-weekly class meetings and tutor two evenings a week. No previous tutoring experience is necessary. Students are required to keep and submit a weekly journal of their experiences, examine a textbook and journal articles concerned with literacy and adult education, write four papers throughout the semester, and prepare a final paper or project. An additional reading assignment is required for the Core requirement.

 

College of Arts & Sciences Statement on Academic Integrity

A basic mission of a university is to search for and to communicate the truth as it is honestly perceived. A genuine learning community cannot exist unless this demanding standard is a fundamental tenet of the intellectual life of the community. Students of Loyola University Chicago are expected to know, to respect, and to practice this standard of personal honesty.

Academic dishonesty can take several forms, including, but not limited to cheating, plagiarism, copying another student’s work, and submitting false documents. Academic cheating is a serious act that violates academic integrity. Cheating includes,

but is not limited to, such acts as

• Obtaining, distributing, or communicating examination materials prior to the scheduled examination without the consent of the teacher

• Providing information to another student during an examination

• Obtaining information from another student or any other person during an examination

• Using any material or equipment during an examination without consent of the instructor, or in a manner which is not authorized by the instructor

• Attempting to change answers after the examination has been submitted

• Unauthorized collaboration, or the use in whole or part of another student’s work, on homework, lab reports, programming assignments, and any other course work which is completed outside of the classroom

• Falsifying medical or other documents to petition for excused absences or extensions of deadlines

• Any other action that, by omission or commission, compromises the integrity of the academic evaluation process

Plagiarism is a serious form of violation of the standards of academic dishonesty. Plagiarism is the appropriation of ideas, language, work, or intellectual property of another, either by intent or by negligence, without sufficient public acknowledgement

and appropriate citation that the material is not one's own. It is true that every thought probably has been influenced to some degree by the thoughts and actions of others. Such influences can be thought of as affecting the ways we see things and express all thoughts. Plagiarism, however, involves the taking and use of specific words and ideas of others without proper acknowledgement of the sources, and includes the following:

• Submitting as one's own material copied from a published source, such as print, Internet, CD-ROM, audio, video, etc.

• Submitting as one's own another person's unpublished work or examination material

• Allowing another or paying another to write or research a paper for one's own benefit

• Purchasing, acquiring, and using for course credit a pre-written paper/

The above list is in no way intended to be exhaustive. Students should be guided by the principle that it is of utmost importance to give proper recognition to all sources. To do so is both an act of personal, professional courtesy and of intellectual honesty. Any failure to do so, whether by intent or by neglect, whether by omission or commission, is an act of plagiarism. A more detailed description of this issue can be found at http://luc.edu/english/writing.shtml#source .

In addition, a student may not submit the same paper or other work for credit in two or more classes without the expressed prior permission of all instructors. A student who submits the same work for credit in two or more classes without the expressed prior permission of all instructors will be judged guilty of academic dishonesty, and will be subject to sanctions described below. This applies even if the student is enrolled in the classes during different semesters. If a student plans to submit work with similar or overlapping content for credit in two or more classes, the student should consult with all instructors prior to submission of the work to make certain that such submission will not violate this standard.

Plagiarism or any other act of academic dishonesty will result minimally in the instructor’s assigning the grade of "F" for the assignment or examination. The instructor may impose a more severe sanction, including a grade of “F” in the course. All instances of academic dishonesty must be reported by the instructor to the chairperson of the department involved, and to the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. The chairperson may constitute a hearing board to consider the imposition of sanctions in addition to those imposed by the instructor, including a recommendation of expulsion, depending on the seriousness of the misconduct. In the case of multiple instances of academic dishonesty, the academic dean of the student's college may convene a hearing board.

Students have the right to appeal the decision of the hearing board to the academic dean of the college in which they are registered. The decision of the dean is final in all cases except expulsion. The sanction of expulsion for academic dishonesty may be imposed only by the Provost upon recommendation of a dean. Students have a right to appeal any finding of academic dishonesty against them. The procedure for such an appeal can be found at http://www.luc.edu/academics/catalog/undergrad/reg_academicgrievance.shtml .

The College of Arts and Sciences maintains a permanent record of all instances of academic dishonesty. The information in that record is confidential. However, students may be asked to sign a waiver which releases that student’s record of dishonesty as a part of the student’s application to a graduate or professional school, to a potential employer, to a bar association, or to similar organizations.

Approved by the CAS Council of Chairs & Program Directors on 9/17/07; Endorsed by the CAS Academic Council on 9/19/07