Loyola University Chicago

Mathematics and Statistics

MATH 131

During the first week of classes, all students enrolled in this course will take an assessment test. The assessment is part of a larger effort to reduce the number of withdrawals and low grades in our introductory math courses by identifying early on those students needing extra assistance.

In preparation for the assessment test, you may find practice problems on this site: http://webwork.math.luc.edu/webwork2/Math-lib/, clicking on the "Guest Login" button, and then clicking the link to the appropriate "Practice" set. From there, you can solve practice problems online and check your answers.

NOTE: The problems should be done without the use of any calculator as the actual assessment will follow the same format.

Deborah Hughes-Hallett, et al. Applied & Single Variable Calculus for Loyola University Chicago with WebAssign Custom (WebAssign eBook).

Chapter 1: A Library of Functions
    1.1    Functions and Change
    1.2    Exponential Functions
    1.3    New Functions from Old
    1.4    Logarithmic Functions
    1.5    Trigonometric Functions
    1.6    Powers, Polynomials, and Rational Functions
    1.7    Introduction to Continuity
    1.8    Limits
Chapter 2: Key Concept: The Derivative
    2.1    How Do We Measure Speed?
    2.2    The Derivative at a Point
    2.3    The Derivative Function
    2.4    Interpretations of the Derivative
    2.5    The Second Derivative
Chapter 3: Short-Cuts to Differentiation
    3.1    Powers and Polynomials
    3.2    The Exponential Function
    3.3    The Product and Quotient Rules
    3.4    The Chain Rule
    3.5    The Trigonometric Functions
    3.6    The Chain Rule and Inverse Functions
Chapter 4: Using the Derivative
    4.1    Using First and Second Derivatives
    4.2    Optimization
    4.3    Optimization and Modeling
    4.4    Families of Functions and Modeling
    4.5    Applications to Marginality
    4.7    L’Hopital’s Rule, Growth, and Dominance
Chapter 5: Using the Derivative
    5.1    How Do We Measure Distance Traveled?
    5.2    The Definite Integral
    5.3    The Fundamental Theorem and Interpretations
    5.4    Theorems about Definite Integrals
Chapter 6: Constructing Antiderivatives
    6.1    Antiderivatives Graphically and Numerically
    6.2    Constructing Antiderivatives Analytically

Below are “core problems” that we expect students to be able to solve to ensure understanding of the material in the course syllabus. The problems are taken from Applied & Single Variable Calculus for Loyola University Chicago (packaged with WebAssign), 4th ed., Hughes-Hallett, Deborah, et al.

Chapter 1. A Library of Functions
1.1 1, 8, 13, 16, 23, 27, 31, 37, 41, 44, 59
1.2 2, 5, 6, 8, 10, 16, 17, 19, 22, 32, 42
1.3 8, 12, 13, 18, 24, 37, 38, 39, 43, 46, 50, 58, 66
1.4 2, 6, 10, 16, 24, 26, 30, 33, 39, 50, 52
1.5 6, 10, 12, 18, 20, 28, 30, 36, 38, 48
1.6 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 17, 18, 32, 34, 40, 42
1.7 2, 4, 6, 13, 20, 22, 32
1.8 2, 3, 12, 14, 22, 31, 42, 53, 56, 60, 63
Chapter 2. Key Concept: The Derivative
2.1 1, 3, 5, 6, 10, 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, 26, 28
2.2

1, 3, 4, 8, 10, 13, 16, 17, 26, 27, 31, 41, 45, 48

2.3 1, 2, 4, 12, 20, 22, 28, 40, 41, 43
2.4 2, 3, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 20, 23, 29, 32
2.5 2, 3, 8, 9, 12, 14, 15, 24, 29, 30, 31
Chapter 3. Short-Cuts to Differentiation
3.1

6, 10, 11, 14, 18, 23, 25, 28, 30, 32, 35, 38, 45, 52, 62, 64, 65

3.2

2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 13, 17, 24, 39, 40, 45, 47, 48

3.3

4, 6, 7, 10, 12, 16, 19, 20, 24, 28, 31, 43, 44, 46, 52, 65

3.4 2, 4, 7, 11, 16, 18, 26, 28, 30, 32, 45, 48, 57, 59, 61, 66, 68, 77, 91
3.5 4, 8, 10, 12, 16, 19, 22, 24, 26, 30, 36, 38, 45, 57, 62
3.6

1, 2, 12, 13, 17, 22, 25, 26, 27, 28, 32, 37, 38, 39, 41, 51

Chapter 4. Using the Derivative
4.1

1, 5, 14, 16, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 35, 38, 44

4.2

4, 6, 7, 8, 10, 13, 18, 19, 26, 31, 32, 33, 34, 38

4.3

4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 13, 17, 21, 24, 26, 35, 36, 42

4.4 3, 4, 16, 29, 30, 32, 34, 35, 36, 42, 51
4.5

1, 3, 4, 9, 10, 12, 13, 15

4.7 4, 5, 7, 14, 15, 21, 26, 31, 34, 38, 40, 53, 60, 68
Chapter 5. Using the Derivative
5.1

1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 14, 15, 23, 25, 26, 28

5.2 4, 8, 12, 22, 24, 29, 30, 32, 36, 39, 40
5.3 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 30
5.4 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 11, 14, 16, 19, 21, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 33, 46
Chapter 6. Constructing Antiderivatives
6.1 3, 7, 8, 12, 14, 15, 16, 19, 20, 25
6.2

1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 18, 20, 21, 26, 27, 28, 35, 36, 41, 44, 50, 53, 56, 70, 73

WebAssign is an online, interactive environment for teaching and learning. As part of the required text for MATH 131/132, you are asked to purchase an access code for WebAssign. This access code may be (re)used for MATH 131 and MATH 132 at no additional charge.

By department policy, all sections of MATH 131 and MATH 132 require online homework on "Core Problems; " this course component should count at least 5% towards students' final course grade. (The ground rules document provided by your instructor will have further details.) 

If you have received(*) a Class Key from your instructor or otherwise, follow the steps below to register for your section in WebAssign:

  1. From www.webassign.net, click on “I have a Class Key” in the “Account Log In” box (https://www.webassign.net/v4cgi/selfenroll/classkey.html) and enter luc ABCD WXYZ (where ABCD WXYZ is an eight-digit number provided to you by your instructor).
  2. If the correct class and section is listed, click Yes, this is my class. (Else, see WebAssign Support for help getting started.)
  3. If you do not already have a WebAssign account, check I need to create a WebAssign account and click Continue. Otherwise, check I already have a WebAssign account and enter your username, institution, and password. The institution is luc all in lowercase. (NOTE: For roster management purposes, it would be helpful if you choose your LoyolaID when setting up your WebAssign account.)
  4. At this point, you will have three choices:
    • Enter an access code purchased at the Loyola Bookstore or from the Cengage website,
    • Purchase an access code online from WebAssign, or
    • Continue the 14 day free trial. (**)
    Select the appropriate choice to access the e-book and homework assignments.

FURTHER NOTES: (*)If you registered for your section more than one week before the start of classes, then you should receive an email with Class Key from the department no later than the Friday before classes begin. Students without a Class Key by the start of classes can get this information from their instructor.

(**) Students may register for their WebAssign course immediately, even without an access code. Open enrollment closes two weeks after the semester begins.

Should you choose Math 161/162 or Math 131/132?

Any questions about placement in calculus or other 100-level courses that remain after reading that section should be directed to John Houlihan, Mathematics Placement Director. Please e-mail him to set up an appointment.

Math 161/162 (Calculus I, Calculus II) is a traditional calculus sequence covering all the basic topics of one-variable calculus. This sequence is a prerequisite for Multivariable Calculus (Math 263) as well as for almost all higher-level math courses. It is required for all students majoring in Chemistry, Engineering Science, Mathematics, Physics and Statistics. It is highly recommended, although not required, for students majoring in Biology, Computer Science and Economics.

Math 131/132 (Applied Calculus I, Applied Calculus II) is more of a survey sequence covering many of the basic topics in one-variable calculus as well as some topics in multivariable calculus and differential equations. It is a terminal sequence in that it does not satisfy the prerequisites of upper-level mathematics and statistics courses. Students who enjoyed mathematics in high school and earned ACT math scores of 28 and higher or SAT math scores of 610 and higher are encouraged to choose the Math 161/162 sequence.

Center for Tutoring and Academic Excellence

The Center for Tutoring & Academic Excellence offers free collaborative learning opportunities that include small group tutoring and tutor-led study halls to Loyola students. To learn more or request tutoring services, visit the Center for Tutoring & Academic Excellence online at http://www.luc.edu/tutoring.

Loyola Math Club Tutoring

The Loyola Math Club offers free tutoring to students in 100-level MATH courses (and others). 

Math Club tutoring for Fall 2016 has not yet been announced. (Spring tutoring took place on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 7-8:30pm in Cuneo Hall Room 111.)