Loyola University Chicago

Mission Integration

Service Days and Feast Day Celebration

Every July, we honor the Feast Day of Saint Ignatius of Loyola by reaching out in service to our community partners. This is an ideal opportunity for Loyola University Chicago employees to put our mission into action. Please join us in service to and with others.

To register your participation in the Ignatian Service Days, please click here.

Click here to read Feast Day Reflections 2020 from the Feast of St. Ignatius Word Service.

Events

Friday, July 31 - Saturday, August 15

1. Correspondence Opportunities

Loyola University Chicago has partnered with four organizations that will benefit from receiving correspondence in the form of cards and/or letters from the LUC community. Consider taking some time to write to those in need of more social connection.  The four organizations are:

  • Envision Unlimited is an organization working with adults with both intellectual and developmental disabilities. A major part of their mission includes Community Integrated Living Arrangements which allow spaces for individuals to live in community with one another. They are currently social distancing, and are looking for cards for their members during this difficult time.  

  • Misericordia offers a community of care that maximizes potential for persons with mild to profound developmental disabilities, many of whom are also physically challenged.  Through a spectrum of residential options on its 31-acre Chicago campus and in the community, and with a wide variety of programs, Misericordia currently serves more than 600 children and adults residentially, from diverse racial, religious and socio-economic backgrounds. Residents look forward to receiving messages of encouragement during this time of social distancing. 

  • Loyola University Medical Center:  Loyola University community is invited to write letters of encouragement and gratitude to those serving on the frontlines of healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic. You may submit a snapshot of a handwritten note, or you can email a typed, electronic letter. Notes will be collected, printed, and distributed by Loyola Stritch School of Medicine students. 

  • Cards for Kidz!  is focused on delivering cards and uplifting messages to children in disheartening situations. This is an organization that began in Chicago but now has national and international reach on each continent. They very much welcome cards written in languages other than English. 


2. Projects To Do Remotely

Create Greeting Cards for the Elderly:  Create cards for the residents of Little Sisters of the Poor, St Mary’s Home.   This project invites volunteers to either select cards with designs already on them or to create their own original designs.  The volunteer draws and colors in his or her own artwork on the blank cards or colors in the provided design on the cards.  The volunteer writes a message in each card, of either original thoughts or choosing from some provided suggestions. 

Loyola Archives & Special Collections Digitization Priorities Project:  The Loyola Archives & Special Collections is soliciting recommendations on what materials from our collections would be most useful if available digitally. The goal of this project is to create a priority list for digitization of primary sources to be used by Loyola students and faculty, and other researchers, for research and projects. Archives & Special Collections staff will use this list to plan digitization efforts for the next two to three years, including this year.

Loyolans and COVID-19:  The Loyola University Archives is documenting the impact of COVID-19 on the Loyola community by collecting stories, photos, videos, oral histories, etc, of students, staff, and faculty. 

Zooniverse:  The Zooniverse is the world’s largest and most popular platform for people-powered research. This research is made possible by volunteers — more than a million people around the world who come together to assist professional researchers. Our goal is to enable research that would not be possible, or practical.  From the projects page, you can choose a project you like the look of and get started. There is a wide-range of projects, covering many disciplines and topics across the sciences and humanities, so anyone and everyone can explore, learn, and have fun in the Zooniverse.

 

3. Make a Financial Contribution to an Ignatian Inspired Ministry

Loyola Employee Emergency Fund (LEEF) LEEF is supported solely by donations from staff and faculty with the intent to "Help Us Help Each Other." Upon request, financial assistance may be provided to University employees (faculty and staff) to help them recover financially from loss due to natural emergencies, accidents, catastrophes, deaths, or illnesses.

Loyola Commitment addresses the needs of our students impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Many students face significant financial challenges. In response to these needs the University established The Loyola Commitment, a program designed to assist our graduate and undergraduate students in financing the pursuit of their Loyola degree.

Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS) JRS is an international Jesuit ministry with a mission to accompany, serve, and advocate on behalf of refugees and other forcibly displaced persons, that they may heal, learn, and determine their own future. JRS USA also serves forcibly displaced migrants in the US through our Detention Chaplaincy Program. The Jesuit Refugee Service USA chaplaincy programs provide pastoral and religious assistance to meet the needs of non-citizens detained by the Department of Homeland Security. These programs enable people of all faiths to have access to pastoral care within their faith tradition.

Ignatian Spirituality Project (ISP) The Ignatian Spirituality Project invites those recovering from homelessness and addiction to experience God’s unconditional love. ISP believes spirituality has an important role to play on the journey of recovery. ISP exists to “light a path” forward,hoping that through reflection on life experiences within a safe and welcoming environment, participants can begin to find the self-acceptance, hope and healing needed to reclaim their lives. Though founded in the Jesuit tradition, ISP does not proselytize, and people of all (or no) faith traditions are welcome.
 

4. Social Justice Formation

The Feast of St. Ignatius elevates our Jesuit values of being Women and Men For and With Others and Contemplatives in Action. Witnessing to these values calls us to continually educate ourselves about social issues, internal biases, diverse communities, and the issues of our time that contribute to oppression, marginalization, violence, and injustice. As part of your commitment to being a person of service and solidarity, we invite you to set aside intentional time to learning and reflect. Upon registration a list of resources will be provided.  Departments or units can choose to commit to reading, listening, or watching material and then come together for virtual conversation on actions for change and further learning.  Reflection will be provided.

5. Maywood Community Partnerships (virtual session)

Saturday, August 8: 10-11:30am

Register for this synchronous session for an introduction to the Village of Maywood, including the many outstanding community organizations and resources focused on racial equity, advocacy, and action surrounding the Health Sciences Campus. Dr. Amy Luke, Chair, Public Health Sciences, Parkinson School of Health Sciences and Public Health, and Maywood resident, will present on local research initiatives and share more about the rich history of the Village. We will also hear from students and organization leaders about the work being done locally to focus on making changes that address social inequalities and injustice. We hope this session will launch our community into further learning and actions related to housing affordability, food justice, healthcare access, and violence prevention, as well as encourage building stronger and deeper relationships within the Maywood community.
 

Friday, July 31

Feast Day Prayer Service

A livestreamed prayer service from Madonna della Strada Chapel will be celebrated on Friday, July 31 at 1:00pm. The link to join this service is: https://youtu.be/fPWvYklgZdo

This thirty-minute prayer service will incorporate scripture readings, music and reflections on our Jesuit tradition. At the end of the service there will be a blessing of those who seek to engage in volunteer service.

Staff Council Trivia Happy Hour (and a Half)

In lieu of the annual feast day picnic, Staff Council will host a Zoom trivia happy hour on Friday, July 31 at 4:00pm     Gather colleagues, your department, or just yourself for some low stakes Ignatian fun.  Trivia categories include St Ignatius of Loyola, Jesuit Colleges and Universities, Music, Geography and Current Events.  The Zoom link is: https://luc.zoom.us/j/93353673175

 

 

 

Make a Financial Contribution to an Ignatian Inspired Ministry

Loyola Employee Emergency Fund (LEEF). LEEF is supported solely by donations from staff and faculty with the intent to "Help Us Help Each Other." Upon request, financial assistance may be provided to University employees (faculty and staff) to help them recover financially from loss due to natural emergencies, accidents, catastrophes, deaths, or illnesses. 

Loyola Commitment addresses the needs of our students impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.  Many students face significant financial challenges. In response to these needs the University established The Loyola Commitment, a program designed to assist our graduate and undergraduate students in financing the pursuit of their Loyola degree. 

Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS) 

JRS is an international Jesuit ministry with a mission to accompany, serve, and advocate on behalf of refugees and other forcibly displaced persons, that they may heal, learn, and determine their own future.  JRS USA also serves forcibly displaced migrants in the US through our Detention Chaplaincy Program. The Jesuit Refugee Service USA chaplaincy programs provide pastoral and religious assistance to meet the needs of non-citizens detained by the Department of Homeland Security. These programs enable people of all faiths to have access to pastoral care within their faith tradition. 

 

Ignatian Spirituality Project (ISP)

The Ignatian Spirituality Project invites those recovering from homelessness and addiction to experience God’s unconditional love. ISP believes spirituality has an important role to play on the journey of recovery. ISP exists to “light a path” forward,hoping that through reflection on life experiences within a safe and welcoming environment, participants can begin to find the self-acceptance, hope and healing needed to reclaim their lives.  Though founded in the Jesuit tradition, ISP does not proselytize, and people of all (or no) faith traditions are welcome.