Loyola University Chicago

College of Arts & Sciences

Spotlight On: NSF Winners

National Science Foundation grants to eleven College of Arts and Sciences faculty provide over $3.9 million dollars for research in fields ranging from biology, psychology, and mathematics and statistics, to computer science and particle physics.

Eleven faculty members in the College of Arts and Sciences at Loyola University Chicago were awarded National Science Foundation (NSF) grants in the latest round of NSF funding (please see below list of faculty and projects). The awards to College of Arts and Science faculty provide over $3.9 million dollars for research in fields ranging from biology, psychology, and mathematics and statistics, to computer science and particle physics. Three of the Loyola faculty members received the prestigious CAREER Award, which is spread out over five years.

The NSF grants spotlight the range of research expertise of faculty in the College of Arts and Sciences across the natural sciences, computational sciences and technology, and the social sciences. These projects advance and deepen knowledge in their fields, support direct and indirect research costs, and provide numerous opportunities for students to become involved in basic research. They are examples of what we can achieve as we work in the College and across Loyola to deepen research capability among diverse disciplines.

The National Science Foundation funds research and education in science and engineering, through grants, contracts, and cooperative agreements. The NSF accounts for about 20 percent of federal support to academic institutions for basic research.

“These amazing scholars and their prestigious NSF grants serve as the embodiment of our shared goal of strengthening and expanding a grant culture throughout the College of Arts and Sciences,” says Peter J. Schraeder, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. “The key is to pursue external grants to fund research projects at a variety of levels that otherwise would not be possible, including faculty research projects within departments or across departments and even schools, encouraging our PhD students to apply for external grants to fund their dissertation fieldwork, and otherwise including graduate and undergraduate students in our externally funded grant projects.”

This year’s NSF grant recipients are:

Rasha Abbasi, Assistant Professor, Department of Physics: “Downward Gamma Ray Showers from Natural Lightning” Read More

Brian Cannon, Associate Professor, Department of Physics: “CAREER: I. The Local and Global Effects on Genomic Architecture by Defects Induced in Repetitive DNA Domains, and II. Development of Integrative Curriculum in Physics” Read More

Dan Cavanaugh, Assistant Professor, Department of Biology: “CAREER: Circadian Control and Integration of Feeding and Metabolic Rhythms in Drosophila” Read More

Eric Chan-Tin, Assistant Professor, Department of Computer Science: “SaTC: EDU: Collaborative: Personalized Cybersecurity Education and Training” Read More

Catherine Haden, Professor, Department of Psychology: “Collaborative Research: Making Space for Story-Based Tinkering to Scaffold Early Informal Engineering Learning” Read More

Dali Liu, Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry: “Developing Switchable Electrophiles As Specific Covalent Protein Modifiers” Read More

Graham Moran, Professor and Carl Moore Endowed Research Chair, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry: “Collaborative Research: The Chemistry of Riboflavin Biosynthesis” Read More

Thomas Sanger, Professor, Department of Biology: “CAREER: The Developmental Regulation of Amniote Skull Diversity” Read More

Brian Seguin, Assistant Professor, Department of Mathematics and Statistics: “Conference: Society for Natural Philosophy Meeting: Microstructure, Defects, and Growth in Mechanics; Chicago, Illinois; September 13-15, 2019” Read More

Yoel Stuart, Assistant Professor, Department of Biology: “EAGER: Effects of Radiation on Life History in Resurrected Daphnia Lineages Exposed to Fallout from 1950s Atmospheric Nuclear Testing” Read More

Walter Tangarife, Assistant Professor, Department of Physics: “Intersections Between Dark Matter and Neutrinos.”