Loyola University Chicago

Division of Student Development

Divisional Learning Outcomes

Overview

The Division of Student Development at Loyola University Chicago supports a transformative, holistic education through its programs and initiatives. Students, faculty, staff, and administrators engage and support all students in learning and applying the values, skills, and competencies needed to enhance the intellectual, social, and spiritual growth of every student. The Division offers developmental and sequential programs and services to support students and enrich their learning experience through involvement in a wide range of co-curricular pursuits that mirror the values of the core curriculum. Based on the University Mission, the Divisional Vision and Mission, and the Student Promise, the Division of Student Development adopts the following Divisional Learning Outcomes as part of its Strategic Plan for igniting campus engagement and preparing students to lead and serve in a diverse and changing world.

Domain Definition:
The Division of Student Development, in partnership with the Division of Academic Affairs, fosters and promotes the process through which students gain, translate, and apply learned knowledge and are prepared to “lead extraordinary lives.” This translation occurs through understanding and connecting knowledge across disciplines, gaining and acquiring new knowledge, and incorporating knowledge into daily life.

Learning Outcome:
As a result of participating in Student Development programs and activities, students will gain knowledge and apply lessons from curricular and co-curricular experiences to everyday life.



Descriptors:
Acquisition
-    Acquire new knowledge toward personal, social, and career development

Application
-    Apply knowledge to experiences in all settings

Integration
-    Evaluate experience and discern how they affect others locally and globally
-    Integrate knowledge and experiences for the purposes of decision-making and problem-solving

 
List of Collegiate Experience Examples:
•    Serving as a Resident Assistant or Learning Community Assistant
•    Participation in a Registered Student Organization (RSO) or Sponsored Student Organization
•    Sorority & Fraternity Life experience
•    Alternative Break Immersion
•    Study Abroad
•    Serving on Department of Programming ((dop))
•    Learning Community participation
•    Unified Student Government Association (USGA)
•    RSO or Greek Student Conduct Board
•    Search committee service
•    Conference participation
•    Office of Outdoor Experiential Education
•    Department of Student Development Multicultural Affairs (SDMA) Identity Groups
•    Leadership in Action Workshop

Domain Definition:
Division of Student Development programs encourage recognition of one’s identities, self, and community. They also encourage recognition that one exists in interrelated local and global communities composed of those both similar to and different from oneself. This is coupled with an understanding of how one’s identities, self, and community affect interactions with others. Students apply principles of Transformative Education through open, challenging, and constructive interactions and dialogue with others from various backgrounds.

Learning Outcome:
As a result of participating in Student Development programs and activities, students will develop their personal identities, recognize and support the identities that others hold, and apply awareness of these identities to dialogue, engage, and collaborate with diverse communities.

1  The Division of Student Development defines a diverse community as people of all races, religions, national origins, socio-economic classes, gender identities and expressions, sexual orientations, physical and learning abilities, and ages (see the Division of Student Development’s Diversity Statement for more information).

Descriptors:
Integrated Knowledge of Self
-    Develop an integrated identity and sense of self through understanding the factors that help shape one’s identity
     o    Factors: experiences, education, race, religion, national origin, socio-economic class, gender identity and expressions, sexual orientation, physical and learning abilities, power and privilege, and age
-    Recognize how one’s identities, self, and community affect interactions with others
Integrated Knowledge of Others
-    Recognize how others define themselves through the factors that shape their identity
     o    Factors: experiences, education, race, religion, national origin, socio-economic class, gender identity and expressions, sexual orientation, physical and learning abilities, power and privilege, and age
-    Be open to others, their values, backgrounds, and ideas through interactions in and out of the classroom
Cross-Cultural Competency in Action
-    Engage in open, challenging, and constructive interactions and dialogue with others from different backgrounds
-    Apply integrated knowledge of self and others to create open and accepting communities both locally and globally

List of Collegiate Experience Examples:
•    Personal development workshops
     o    Interfaith workshops
     o    Interfaith Ally Training
     o    Safe Space workshops
•    On-campus employment
     o    Career Development Center
     o    Rambler Link
•    Living in residence halls (Residence Life)
•    Membership in student organizations (SAGA)
•    Participation in service activities (Center for Experiential Learning, Campus Ministry, Community Service)
•    Participation in immersion trips
     o    Alternative Break Immersion
•    Study abroad
•    Core curriculum/coursework in general
     o    Knowledge Areas
•    Maroon & Gold standards
•    Sorority & Fraternity Life, especially multicultural fraternities and sororities
•    The People’s Institute (Leadership Development and SDMA)
•    Interfaith Ally training or workshops

Domain Definition:
Students at Loyola University Chicago have the opportunity to develop and exercise leadership skills in order to purposefully and collaboratively pursue change for the benefit of others, the community, and the world. This domain grows directly out of, and reflects, The Student Promise: Care for myself, care for others, and care for community.

Learning Outcome:
As a result of participating in Student Development programs and activities, students will learn socially responsible leadership by developing the capacity to recognize, resolve, and reflect upon moral and ethical challenges; by demonstrating the ability to work in solidarity with others; and by advancing equitable, sustainable, and thriving communities.

Descriptors:
Morality & Integrity
-    Develop an awareness of situations and circumstances involving moral and ethical issues, including how individual actions affect others
-    Develop moral judgment and ethical decision-making skills through reflection and practice
-    Be conscientious and act in congruence with personal and community values
-    Accept responsibility for actions and the consequences of one’s actions; insist that others likewise demonstrate accountability for their actions
Leadership Development
-    Learn, gain confidence in, and apply leadership skills, abilities, and theories
-    Collaborate with others across various differences and communities
-    Mutually and purposefully develop missions, goals, and actions
-    Engage in change strategies to address community needs
Social Justice
-    Recognize social systems and their influence on individuals and groups
-    Collaborate with others through mutuality, reciprocity, and solidarity
-    Challenge inequitable or unfair circumstances to create change
-    Foster equitable, sustainable, and thriving communities

 
List of Collegiate Experience Examples:
•    Peer Leadership Team (Student Leadership Development)
•    The People’s Institute (SLD/Student Diversity & Multicultural Affairs)
•    Student Community Board (Office of Student Conduct & Conflict Resolution)
•    Hunger Week (Campus Ministry/ Community Service & Action)
•    STARS Leadership Education and Development program (SDMA)
•    Labre Ministry (Water Tower Campus Life)
•    Student-Athlete Advisory Council (Athletics)
•    Residential Learning Communities (Residence Life)
•    Alternative Break Immersion program (partnerships with Campus Ministry)
•    Campus Recreation Advisory Board (Campus Recreation)
•    Wellness Advocates (Wellness Center)
•    Registered Student Organizations (SAGA)
     o    Global Brigades
     o    Best Buddies

Domain Definition:
Through the myriad experiences offered to Loyola students during their collegiate years, they will grow in their adult spirituality as they gain a deeper understanding of their faith and other faith traditions. Additionally, they will grow in appreciation and understanding of the Ignatian values such as Magis, faith that does justice, seeking God in all things, and being contemplatives in action.

Learning Outcome:
As a result of participating in Student Development programs and activities, students will develop an understanding of Ignatian values and deepen their adult spirituality.



Descriptors:
Ignatian Values
-    Magis
     o    Articulate the difference between “doing more” and “seeking depth” in their lives.
-    Faith That Does Justice
     o    Understand implications of personal and group decisions on self, other, and community.
     o    Explore issues of justice through service to the community.
     o    Standing on a foundation of faith, challenge oppressive systems and behavior in order to affect change.
-    Seeking God in All Things
     o    Recognize inherent spirituality and dignity of “the other.”
     o    Acknowledge evidence of the Divine in the environment, lived experiences and others.
-    Being Contemplatives in Action
     o    Articulate the importance that reflection plays in own life.
     o    Engage in a structured form of reflection that includes an element of commitment and action.
Adult Spirituality
-    Participate in interfaith experiences that expand knowledge of other religious traditions and clarify their understanding of own beliefs.
-    Engage in activities that will enhance their faith.
-    Commit to a religious community.
 
List of Collegiate Examples:
•    Attend retreats, start the fire, and ABI experiences.
•    Participate in service opportunities, both one-time and on-going.
•    Join a faith based program.
•    Live out a commitment to the Student Promise.
•    Take part in meditation, prayer, and reflection activities.
•    Incorporate their faith into academic service learning experiences.
•    Organize a faith based experience for self and others.

Domain Definition:
The activities in this domain will aid students to recognize the interconnectivity of mind, body and spirit and will help instill in them the capacity to lead healthy lives while at Loyola and beyond.

Learning Outcome:
As a result of participating in Student Development programs and activities, students will:
•    Identify options to support and maintain positive well-being.
•    Demonstrate the capacity to analyze basic health information and services.



Descriptors:
Holistic Well-being
-    Knowing where to find and access accurate health information at Loyola University Chicago and the surrounding community
-    Demonstrate the capacity to obtain, process, and understand health information
-    Understanding the interconnectivity of emotional wellness as it relates to maintaining body and spirit
-    Develop habits that promote physical wellness
Engage the Environment
-    Develop an awareness of the larger environment, the ways the environment supports well-being, and ways to contribute to its sustainability

List of Collegiate Examples:
•    Visiting a dietician at the Wellness Center
•    Attending the Wellness Fair
•    Discussing dietary needs/preferences with dining hall staff
•    Free flu vaccines at the Wellness Center
•    Taizé Prayer service
•    Routine health exams
•    Rehabilitation, Athletics
•    Wellness Center, Campus Recreation, Campus Ministry websites
•    Accessing appropriate healthcare and information post-graduation
•    Mindfulness Meditation at the Wellness Center
•    Resident Assistant programming in the Residence Halls
•    Retreats at LUREC
•    Stress reduction workshops at the Wellness Center
•    Exploring Ramble Outdoors
•    Intramural Sports, Campus Recreation
•    Finding a service project with Campus Ministry or Community Service and Action
•    Group Fitness Classes (e.g., Yoga, Spin, Pilates)
•    Utilizing a Personal Trainer, Campus Recreation
•    Participating in the Spiritual Exercises in Everyday Life