Loyola University Chicago

Asian Studies

Fall 2018 Courses

Sections:

MWF 8:15-9:05     Mundelein 407

MWF 9:20-10:10   Mundelein 407

MWF 12:35-1:25   Cuneo 104

MWF 1:40-2:30     Mundelein 404

MWF 2:45-3:35     Mundelein 404

TuTh 8:30-9:45     Mundelein 506

TuTh 10-11:15      Mundelein 506

This course is a study of cultural diversity on a global scale, and provides a comparative perspective on the investigation of humans as cultural and social beings. 

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the historic and contemporary relationships between cultures and societies, and to understand how cultures change over time.

Schedule:

MWF 9:20-10:10   Dumbach 123

TuTh 1-2:15          Corboy 326

 

This is an introductory course in Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin) for students with none or little prior experience in Chinese. This course introduces the four basic communicative skills in Chinese: listening, speaking, reading and writing, and emphasizes on conversation. 
Outcome: Students will achieve active control of Chinese sound system and writing system. They will be able to understand and respond to greetings, as well as talk about family members, time, hobbies and friends. They will learn nearly 200 characters.

Schedule:

TuTh 2:30-3:45    Corboy 325

 

Prerequisite:  CHIN 101
CHIN 102 is a continuation of CHIN 101. Students will expand their knowledge of Chinese characters, vocabulary and grammar, improve their skills on listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and learn more cultural knowledge.
Outcome: Students will be able to make appointments, talk about Chinese learning experience, school life, shopping, weather and transportation. Aside from dialogues, they will also read a short dairy and a letter. They will learn some 200 new characters.

Schedule:

MWF 11:30-12:20    Cuneo 103

 

Prerequisite: CHIN 102
CHIN103 builds on the knowledge and skills gained in CHIN 101-102. This course develops conversational skills by using fundamental grammatical patterns and vocabulary in functional contexts.
Outcome: Students will learn dialogues used in the contexts of dinning out, studying in library, asking directions, attending birthday party, seeing a doctor, and dating.

Schedule:

MWF 1:40-2:30     Cuneo 103

Prerequisite:  CHIN 103
Chinese 104 is the continuation of Chinese 103. This course further extends student's knowledge of Chinese vocabulary and grammar, and improves their skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. 
Outcome:  Students will learn expressions in the contexts of renting an apartment, mailing a letter and traveling in both mainland China and Taiwan, talking about hometown and sports, and checking in at the airport.

Schedule:

TuTh 11:30-12:45    Mundelein 708

An examination of the cultural background and major art forms of South Asia from the Indus River Valley settlements to the Present. As well as sculpture, architecture and painting, popular visual art forms will be examined.
Outcomes: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the religious, cultural and political forces shaping South Asian art. They will be able to distinguish the regional styles and identify the major monuments of South Asia. Students will understand the role of the visual arts in South Asian society.

Schedule:

TuTh 8:30-9:45     Mundelein 403

TuTh 10-11:15      Mundelein 403

Requirement: HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 103, or HIST 104 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students with a declared major or minor in History.
This course explores the roles and contributions of China, Japan, and Korea from the sixteenth century to the present tracing such themes as nationalism, capitalism, socialism, imperialism, war, peace, race, and gender struggles. 
Outcome: Students will demonstrate an ability to evaluate and explain the forces of historical continuity and change; understand the relationships among historical events, cultures and social forces; analyze and discuss the significance of primary and secondary sources.

Schedule:

MWF 1:40-2:30    Mundelein 621

MWF 2:45-3:45    Mundelein 607

Requirement: HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 103, or HIST 104 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students with a declared major or minor in History.
The course will introduce the historical development of Islamic civilization and the formation of Muslim social and political institutions from the 7th century to the present. 
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the historical development and diversity of Islamic beliefs, practices, and institutions in varied regional contexts and historical periods.

Schedule:

TuTh 1-2:15    Cuneo 111

This course studies early modern Chinese society, economy, and the state from ca. 1550 to 1800, a period which marked the culmination of the development of the centralized, bureaucratic, imperial state and exhibited significant innovations in economic structure and activity. 

Students will be able to describe the pressure of unprecedented demographic growth, and explain how the society began to experience many of the problems that continue. They will be able analyze China's failure to build on its earlier economic and technological successes by exploring intellectual life and its relation to scientific and technological innovation.

Schedule:

TuTh 2:30-3:45    Cuneo 111

This course is an introduction to the two sister languages, Hindi and Urdu.  No previous knowledge of either language is assumed. It also introduces the Devanagari script in which Hindi is written. 
Outcome: Students will be introduced to the spoken language and the script in which the majority of native speakers write the language.

Schedule:

TuTh 1-2:15    Mundelein 519

Prerequisite: Completion of HONR 101, HONR D101, HONR 102, and HONR D102. Restricted to students in the Honors Program.
This course will introduce students to various regions in Asia and some of the fundamental components of Asian civilizations as they have evolved historically and persist in the modern world.  Regions might include East, South and Southeast Asia. 
Outcomes:  Students will learn different methods of interpreting cultural, economic, political, and social forces, and their impact on human behavior.  They will become aware of variations in human identities and values, ideas of justice, and shared understandings in unfamiliar cultures

Schedule:

TuTh 11:30-12:45    Cudahy 318

Prerequisite: Completion of HONR 101, HONR D101, HONR 102, and HONR D102. Restricted to students in the Honors Program.
This course will introduce students to the literature of various regions in Asia. Students read representative literary texts, exploring cross-cultural linkages and influences within Asia as a whole as well the distinctive characteristics of individual societies.
Outcomes:  Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the various ways in which human identities and values have been presented in literature; they will be able to analyze and defend interpretations of a variety of literary texts.

Schedule:

MWF 10:25-11:15   Dumbach 234

MWF 11:30-12:20   Dumbach 4

This course introduces the four basic communicative skills in Japanese: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Students gain knowledge of Japanese culture and ways of thinking which provide the context for communicating in Japanese.  No previous knowledge of Japanese is required.
Outcome: Students will be able to understand and respond to greetings, introductions, and basic question about time, location, and directions and will be able to read and write hiragana and katakana, the two phonetic Japanese scripts as well as about 25 ideographic characters.

Schedule:

TuTh 10-11:15    Cudahy 206

Prerequisite:  JAPN 101

Students will build on the skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing gained in JAPN 101. 

Outcome: Students will be able to introduce themselves and others, discuss daily life, and read and write simple paragraph length compositions with the aid of vocabulary lists.

Schedule:

TuTh 11:30-12:45    Cudahy 206

Prerequisite:  JAPN 102
Students will expand their knowledge of Japanese vocabulary, grammar, usage, and speech levels, using Japanese as a medium for learning Japanese
Outcome: Students will use written and spoken Japanese to ask for and express opinions, to ask for assistance, and to participate in a variety of written and verbal social routines.

Schedule:

TuTh 11:30-12:45     Mundelein 205

Composition and conversation

Schedule:

MWF 10:25-11:15    Cudahy 206

MWF 12:35-1:25      Inst for Env Sust 111

TuTh 2:30-3:45        Cudahy 206

Mon 4:30-7              Dumbach 238

Wed 4:30-7              Dumbach 238

Requirement: UCLR 100 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of English, Department of Classical Studies, or Department of Modern Languages and Literatures. 
This course will study masterpieces of Asian literature in a variety of literary genres in their cultural context. 
Outcomes: Students will gain a significant understanding of how Asian literary works reflect their Asian cultural context.

Schedule:

MWF 12:35-1:25      Crown 141

TuTh 10-11:15         TBA

Requirement: ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of Anthropology, Department of Criminal Justice, Department of Economics, Department of Psychology, Department of  Political Science, the Department of  Sociology, Human Services or the School of Nursing.

This course examines the development of cultural, society, and self-understanding by exploring the social construction of race in the United States. The course explores how social constructions of race affect interpersonal relations, laws, policies, and practices in various racial and ethnic communities.
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the conditions which have worsened racial tensions as well as how social movements have been successful at eradicating racially oppressive laws and working towards a just society.

Schedule:

MWF 11:30-12:20     Dumbach 228

This course examines the manner in which contemporary society is divided by race, ethnicity, class, sexuality and gender, and the impact of social institutions on these divisions. An emphasis will be placed on income/wealth differences, status differences, class conflict and social conflict over time. 
Outcome: Students will acquire a better understanding of social inequality and what can be done to make society more just.

Schedule:

Mon 8:30-11         Corboy 423

Mon 11:30-2         Corboy 105

Wed 11:30-2         Corboy 301

Wed 7-9:30pm      Corboy 422

Wed 7-9:30pm      Corboy 523

Fri 8:15-10:45am  Corboy 302

Expanding our awareness of the various systems of oppression and privilege that contribute to our self-awareness and self-concept as well as our perceptions of others (macro).
Social work students will understand the concepts of privilege, oppression and social justice in their work with all diverse populations.

Schedule:

TuTh 8:30-9:45       Cuneo 117

TuTh 11:30-12:45   Mundelein 304

Requirement: THEO 100 or THEO 107 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012.
This course provides an introduction to Hinduism. 
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Hindu scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Hinduism, the key Hindu concepts,terms, values, and religious practices, and the basic narratives and imagery of Hinduism.

Schedule:

MWF 9:20-10:10     Mundelein 620

MWF 10:25-11:15   Mundelein 621

Requirement: THEO 100 or THEO 107 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012.
This course will provide an introduction to Islam. 
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Muslim scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Islam, the key Islamic concepts, terms, values, and religious practices, and the diversity within Islam.

Schedule:

Mon 7-9:30pm    Corboy 322

Tue 7-9:30pm     Corboy 522

Wed 4:15-6:45    Mundelein 403

Requirement: THEO 100 or THEO 107 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012.
This course provides an introduction to Buddhism. 
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Buddhist scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Buddhism, including its different major branches, and the key Buddhist concepts,terms, values, and religious practices.

Schedule:

Mon 7-9:30pm     Corboy 322

Tue 7-9:30pm      Corboy 522

Wed 4:15-6:45    Mundelein 403

Requirement: THEO 100 or THEO 107 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012.
This course provides an introduction to Buddhism. 
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Buddhist scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Buddhism, including its different major branches, and the key Buddhist concepts,terms, values, and religious practices.

Schedule:

MWF 1:40-2:30    Mundelein 415

MWF 2:45-3:35    Mundelein 304

An introductory survey of selected teachings, institutions, and practices of the great religious traditions of South Asia and East Asia placed in historical context. 
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the central texts, beliefs, ethical understandings, and practices of at least three Asian religions.

ASIA 381 - Student Life Assistant Practicum 

ENVS 281V - Humans and the Environment in Contemporary Vietnam

HIST 208V - Southeast Asia Since 1858 

HONR 209C - Encountering Asia

LITR 245 - Asian Masterpieces

PLSC 362V - Culture, Politics & Development in Contemporary Vietnam 

SOCL 264 - Contemporary Vietnam: Class, Family, and Gender

THEO 299 - Religions of Asia 

VIET 101 - Vietnamese I 

VIET 111 - Intensive Vietnamese I and II 

VIET 252 - Vietnamese III