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What are Learning Portfolios? 

A learning portfolio (ePortfolio) is a digital collection of student work, reflections, and educational experiences that demonstrate a student’s work over time, showcasing skills, abilities, values, and experiences, in an online format.

The purpose of a learning portfolio is to:

  • Catalyze integrative learning
  • Contribute to holistic development: personal, academic, and career
  • Encourage active reflection and meaning-making within academic disciplines and on the university as a whole
  • Facilitate integration of topics and themes across disciplines and over time
  • Provide a forum to synthesizing learning and sharing work with others
  • Provide a resource for demonstrating skills, abilities, and experiences in the job-search process

A learning portfolio may include a variety of artifacts—or relevant documents and media files—that provide a holistic representation of who you are academically, personally, and/or professionally. A learning portfolio may function as a venue for collecting and sharing academic work with faculty members, a tool for inviting collaboration and feedback with your peers, or a personal account of your growth and learning process.

Fitch, D., Reed, B., & Peet, M. T. (2008). The Use of ePortfolios in Evaluating the Curriculum and Student Learning. Journal of Social Work Education , 44 (3), 37-54.

Reynolds, C., & Patton, J. (2014). Leveraging the ePortfolio for Integrative Learning. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing.

Resources Below

What You Need to Know

A learning portfolio (ePortfolio) is a digital collection of student work, reflections, and educational experiences that demonstrate a student’s work over time, showcasing skills, abilities, values, and experiences, in an online format. The purpose of a learning portfolio is to:

  • Catalyze integrative learning
  • Contribute to holistic development: personal, academic, and career
  • Encourage active reflection and meaning-making within academic disciplines and on the university as a whole
  • Facilitate integration of topics and themes across disciplines and over time
  • Provide a forum to synthesizing learning and sharing work with others
  • Provide a resource for demonstrating skills, abilities, and experiences in the job-search process. 
  • A learning portfolio may include a variety of artifacts—or relevant documents and media files—that provide a holistic representation of who you are academically, personally, and/or professionally.
  • A learning portfolio may function as a venue for collecting and sharing academic work with faculty members, a tool for inviting collaboration and feedback with your peers, or a personal account of your growth and learning process.

Types of Learning Portfolios

Loyola University Chicago supports four different types of Learning Portfolios. 

  • Course Portfolios
  • Integrative Portfolios
  • Assessment Portfolios
  • Professional/Showcase Portfolios (in partnership with the Career Development Center)

The various types of portfolios may also overlap in function. For instance, integrative portfolios can also be assessment portfolios. 

Learning Portfolio Components

Once you have identified the purpose of your portfolio, the type of learning portfolio (ePortfolio), and your audience, you can start to think about what to include.

The components of a learning portfolio are the learning artifacts, critical reflections to curate artifacts, and web-based platform used to build the portfolio.

Learning Artifacts

Learning artifacts are documents or media files that are electronic evidence of learning and growth over time. Used thoughtfully, artifacts can demonstrate skills, abilities, experiences, or competency. It also is a way to reflect who you are personally, professionally, and academically.

Critical Reflection

Another important aspect of a learning portfolio is critical reflection. For each learning artifact selected it is important to "curate" those items by reflecting on your experiences. Critical reflection goes beyond explaining what the experiences was to talking about why the experience was important, making connections between experiences, and articulating new learning you took away from the experience.

What do I Include?

Loyola Learning Portfolios are intended to be dynamic and engaging representations of learning in the form of skillsabilitiesexperiencesvalues, and competencies. One way to make a learning portfolio dynamic and engaging is to include a variety of forms of multimedia as "learning artifacts."

Learning portfolio artifacts can include:

  • Photos or Slideshows
  • Blogs or Vlogs 
  • Writing Samples (research papers, essays, fiction, reflections, journals)
  • Videos
  • Presentations 
  • Research Posters
  • Web Links

See below for more information and visual examples of learning artifacts For other ideas, check out the Gallery

Copyright & Creative Commons

Before including digital files in your learning portfolio that are not your own original work, be sure to familiarize yourself with copyright laws and policies. You may need to request permission or include proper citation when including or referencing images, data, links, and other files in your portfolio.

Loyola University Chicago has several copyright resources available to you, including:


Creative Commons

It is not always easy finding images, videos, and music that is not protected under copyright and open for public use. Below we have provided a list of tips and tricks for finding fair-use media to protect yourself form violating copyright laws and to respect the work of others.

How to Search Fair-Use Media Specifically:

  • Youtube—After searching for the video/song of your choice click "Filters" in the upper left corner and select "Creative Commons" to search fair-use videos
  • Google Images—After clicking search, select "Search Tools," click "Usage Rights" and pick "Labeled for reuse" or "Labeled for use with modification" if you want to edit the image
  • Soundcloud—After clicking search, select "To modify commercially" in the left panel and pick the option that applies to your folio

Cites with Public Domain Media:

Privacy

Publishing your learning portfolio enables anyone to access your work from the Internet using the web address that you create. You may choose to limit access. This will allow only those to whom you give access to view your portfolio. Keep in mind you can unpublish your work at any time. 

Privacy and Multimedia

If you choose to include multimedia artifacts in your learning portfolio, you may need to create accounts with and upload work to applications such as Scribd, SlideShare, Prezi, and other 3rd party multimedia sites. If you have privacy concerns, make sure to familiarize yourself with each site's privacy options and policies before creating an account and uploading work. On many sites, you have the option to make your work public or private, but limiting access may have an impact on the visibility of your multimedia artifacts in your portfolio.

Digital Identity

What is our digital identity?

It is our online self. We often think of our digital identity as separate from our physical "real world" self but in reality they are connected.

The technology we use nearly every hour of the day allows us to switch between different life roles in rapid succession. We are playing "son or daughter" when messaging our parents, we are playing "socialite" when posting pictures on Facebook, we are playing "professional" when looking at LinkedIn, and we are playing "student" when emailing our professors and doing homework. Our technology permits us to be everywhere at once, but it can also leave us feeling "uprooted" and it can be challenging to figure out how to combine each of these roles together into one person.

This is what learning portfolios are all about. They are about taking all the different life events, experiences, and seemingly scattered life roles, reflecting on how they impact you as a whole person, and combining them into one portfolio of you.

Taskstream Archives

As of August 2020, Loyola University Chicago will no longer support Taskstream as their Learning Portfolio Platform. 

You can still access Taskstream archives by logging in here: https://login.taskstream.com/signon/

Log in using your last UVID LUC credentials. If that doesn’t work, you can reset your password by following these instructions.

Resetting your Taskstream Password

Taskstream users can reset their password by entering the following two pieces of information on the password reset screen.
1) Last name
2) Student ID or Email address or Username ( screenshot below ) 
And after clicking "Email Username & Password Reset" they will get a password reset email at their registered email address. Below are the steps to reset passwords in Taskstream.

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                         Password reset steps: 
To reset your password on Taskstream, please follow these steps:
1. Go to https://login.taskstream.com/signon/
2. Click Forgot Login? (under the Sign In button)
3. Enter your last name and other identifying information and click Email Username & Password Reset
4. An email will be sent to all accounts associated with your email address. Check the email associated with your account and click the link to reset your password.
5. Create a new password (passwords are case sensitive and must be 8 characters, contain at least 1 number, 1 uppercase letter, 1 lowercase letter, and one special character(!@#$). Confirm the password by retyping it, and enter a password hint (something to remind you of the password, in case you forget) and click Enter.

For login troubles, contact Watermark at Watermark Customer Service Support (watermarkinsights.com)

Email: support@watermarkinsights.com 

Phone: (800) 311-5656 on Monday-Thursday 8am-9pm and Friday 8am-7pm (Eastern).