Loyola University Chicago

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Military experts discuss national security issues at Loyola 

Colonel Kareem P. Montague, USA speaks about perceptions of the U.S. military during a panel discussion on national security issues. 

National security and military issues took center stage during a panel discussion February 16 when senior military officers visited Loyola as part of the Eisenhower Series College Program, a United States Army War College academic outreach program. The College of Arts and Sciences hosted the group along with the Department of Political Science, Global and International Studies program, Peace Studies program, and Army, Navy, and Air Force ROTC programs. 

Loyola President Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD, College of Arts and Sciences Dean Thomas Regan, S.J., PhD, and about 70 students, including several from Loyola’s Army ROTC program, listened to a far-reaching discussion amongst panelists Colonel Kareem P. Montague, USA; Colonel Michael P. Sullivan, USA; and Colonel Brian R. Formy-Duval, USA; and moderator Colonel Edward A. Kaplan, USAF.  

The program encourages dialogue on national security matters and other public policy issues between students at the Army's senior educational institution and public institutions, civic organizations, and universities. 

Col. Kaplan said the Eisenhower program started after the Vietnam War “to reach out, to create a bridge between our military and the society it serves.”  

The panel did create a bridge with those in attendance throughout their candid talk on current national security and military issues. Topics ranged from the increasing size of the Chinese military, U.S. government relations with Venezuela, and the Syrian civil war to gender policies in the military.

Each panelist spoke of their military history, which included some who’ve had deployments in Afghanistan and northern Africa, and their individual research for their work as U.S. Army War College graduate students.

Col. Formy-Duval is studying the long-term costs of an All-Volunteer Force, Col. Sullivan is examining the use of proxy warfare by weaker American adversaries, and Col. Montague’s research is on how the U.S. military is viewed as a warrior class (and why that’s not good). 

Col. Montague said that many times he is asked what keeps him awake at night and emphasized that it’s not outside threats such as the Islamic State (also known as I.S.I.S.) but it’s what he perceives as Americans’ inability to have nuanced conversations about the military. 

“As our World War II generation passes on, we have fewer people to talk about what wearing a uniform is about,” he said. 

If nothing else, this panel and program series is a step toward having those nuanced conversations. 

About the Eisenhower Series College Program

Eisenhower program students are selected for their experience, education, speaking ability, and interest in national security issues. In addition to their required U.S. Army War College coursework, they undertake intensive individual study programs throughout the academic year. Each year, program participants visit about 10 select universities nationwide.

Military experts discuss national security issues at Loyola

national-security

‌Colonel Kareem P. Montague, USA speaks about perceptions of the U.S. military during a panel discussion on national security issues.

National security and military issues took center stage during a panel discussion February 16 when senior military officers visited Loyola as part of the Eisenhower Series College Program, a United States Army War College academic outreach program. The College of Arts and Sciences hosted the group along with the Department of Political Science, International Studies program, Peace Studies program, and Army, Navy, and Air Force ROTC programs. 

Loyola President Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD, College of Arts and Sciences Dean Thomas Regan, S.J., PhD, and about 70 students, including several from Loyola’s Army ROTC program, listened to a far-reaching discussion amongst panelists Colonel Kareem P. Montague, USA; Colonel Michael P. Sullivan, USA; and Colonel Brian R. Formy-Duval, USA; and moderator Colonel Edward A. Kaplan, USAF.  

The program encourages dialogue on national security matters and other public policy issues between students at the Army's senior educational institution and public institutions, civic organizations, and universities. 

Col. Kaplan said the Eisenhower program started after the Vietnam War “to reach out, to create a bridge between our military and the society it serves.”  

The panel did create a bridge with those in attendance throughout their candid talk on current national security and military issues. Topics ranged from the increasing size of the Chinese military, U.S. government relations with Venezuela, and the Syrian civil war to gender policies in the military.

Each panelist spoke of their military history, which included some who’ve had deployments in Afghanistan and northern Africa, and their individual research for their work as U.S. Army War College graduate students.

Col. Formy-Duval is studying the long-term costs of an All-Volunteer Force, Col. Sullivan is examining the use of proxy warfare by weaker American adversaries, and Col. Montague’s research is on how the U.S. military is viewed as a warrior class (and why that’s not good). 

Col. Montague said that many times he is asked what keeps him awake at night and emphasized that it’s not outside threats such as the Islamic State (also known as I.S.I.S.) but it’s what he perceives as Americans’ inability to have nuanced conversations about the military. 

“As our World War II generation passes on, we have fewer people to talk about what wearing a uniform is about,” he said. 

If nothing else, this panel and program series is a step toward having those nuanced conversations. 

About the Eisenhower Series College Program

Eisenhower program students are selected for their experience, education, speaking ability, and interest in national security issues. In addition to their required U.S. Army War College coursework, they undertake intensive individual study programs throughout the academic year. Each year, program participants visit about 10 select universities nationwide.