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Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing

Inclusive Excellence

A transformative approach to educating nurses, healthcare teams, and our communities to be more diverse, inclusive, equitable, and anti-racist.

THE MARCELLA NIEHOFF SCHOOL OF NURSING is committed to ensuring that our nursing students and educators are engaging in anti-racist actions to build a more socially-just world. Aligning with, and innovating beyond, the National Academies of Science, Engineering, Medicine’s The Future of Nursing 2020-2030 report, we have dedicated resources, time, and energy to educate students, faculty, staff, and our surrounding communities to be more diverse, inclusive, equitable, and anti-racist. We will accomplish this goal through a comprehensive approach guided by the tenets of Inclusive Excellence: intrapersonal awareness, interpersonal awareness, curriculum transformation, inclusive pedagogy, and inclusive learning environments.

Inclusive Excellence requires us to build equity-minded leadership capacity where all members of the School of Nursing recognize patterns of inequity, take responsibility for student success and outcomes, and take a race-conscious, socio-historical understanding of exclusionary practices in nursing and nursing education.

Our guiding principles:

  • Implement a vision and strategy that supports evidence-based and equitable initiatives to recruit, retain, and increase success for historically marginalized and underrepresented students, faculty, and staff.
  • Develop and sustain inclusive and representative educational learning environments.
  • Create and change policy to institutionalize these principles.
  • Become a national leader and model for inclusive excellence and anti-racism in nursing education.

42%

undergraduate student of color enrollment

17%

full-time faculty of color

74%

of faculty participated in DEI trainings

Resources

Anti-racist actions and thoughts require us to understand how racially diverse groups experience society and how systemic inequity requires us all to take actions to eradicate those systems. Explore our many resources to learn more about anti-racist initiatives and practices at Loyola and beyond. 

Books and articles

Contact Us

Dian Squire, PhD

Founding Associate Dean for Inclusive Excellence

Faculty photo for Dian Squire 200x200

Programs

Jessica Martinez stands in her nursing scrubs outside Arrupe College on Loyola's Water Tower Campus

CARE Pathway to BSN

Short for Collaboration, Access, Resources, and Equity (CARE), this Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) grant program aims to increase the representation of and success of Black and Latinx nursing students by creating a supported pathway from Loyola’s Arrupe College to the Loyola Nursing.

READ MORE
Students participate in a telehealth simulation in the Walgreens Family Virtual Hospital on the Health Sciences Campus

Gender in Nursing

What is gender identity? Gender expression? Gender neutral and gender affirming pronouns? This mini-series of programs will help faculty and staff learn about how to understand the diversity of gender and how to build the most inclusive learning environments for all students. (Coming soon!)

Image Alt Text Here

Book Clubs

Built around three curricula titled "Stories, Critical Perspectives, and Praxis," students, faculty, and staff are invited to build a learning community to explore intersectional human narratives, hone their criticality around understanding systems of oppression, and learn how to implement more socially just pedagogy into their own work. (Coming soon!)

Support Inclusive Excellence at the School of Nursing. Give Today!

Definitions

The School of Nursing's Inclusive Excellence Task Force has defined several important terms to establish a shared lexicon for faculty, staff, and students. Important to understanding these terms is that they all must be understood together and in relationship with each other.

Diversity

Defined broadly, diversity refers to the vast array of salient, socially constructed, and value-laden identities across humankind, inclusive of but not limited to age, citizenship, class, color, disability, gender identity and expression, national origin, race, religion, and sexual identity. More specifically, diversity refers to historically oppressed and marginalized groups who because of oppressive social systems are underrepresented in U.S. higher education.  

Inclusion

Inclusion refers to how institutional practices, policies, and habits transform to include diverse people and perspectives, especially those from historically oppressed groups. The ongoing and adaptive practice of inclusion impacts campus culture and climate.

Equity

The process of modifying practices that have intentionally disadvantaged a particular group so that all people in that group have an equal opportunity to thrive, succeed, and reach their goals. The process is ongoing, requiring us to recognize that we do not all start from the same place and must acknowledge and adjust to imbalances arising from oppressive social systems. 

Intersectionality

The interconnected nature of social systems inclusive of but not limited to ageism, xenophobia, classism, colorism, ableism, heteronormativity, racism, religious oppression, and transantagonism. These systems create overlapping and interdependent systems of oppression that help explain the complexity of human experiences.

Equality

Every individual has the same opportunity to make the most of their lives and talents. Equality is the distribution of the same resources and opportunities to every individual across a population. Equality aims to promote  fairness and must be paired with equitable practices. To have equal systems, all people should be treated fairly, unhampered by stereotypes, biases, or prejudices. 

Social Justice

Social justice entails identifying and contesting social policy and processes in which power and privilege  create inequitable outcomes for marginalized groups that inhibit their democratic empowerment, health equity, health access, and civil and human rights. When injustices occur, the aim is to identify solutions to remove systemic barriers and create equitable access and opportunities for all.

Antiracism

Ongoing actions against racial hatred, bias, systemic racism, and the oppression of historically oppressed and minoritized groups. Anti-racist work institutionalizes policy and programs that address racism. 

Microaggression

The everyday verbal, nonverbal, and environmental slights, snubs, or insults, whether intentional or unintentional, which communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative messages to target persons based solely upon their marginalized group membership. 

Implicit Bias

Attitudes, beliefs, prejudices, and stereotypes that are activated without awareness or intentional control that may impact our understanding, actions, or decisions.  

Civility

Civility is treating one another with respect and inherent dignity of human worth through our words and actions. Civility does not mean that we will agree on everything or that our disagreements can hide behind “niceness”; rather civility includes listening, acknowledging, valuing, and collaborating without degrading someone else in the process. 

Systemic Racism

Any embedded policies, laws, practices, and social and cultural norms that perpetuate and sanction racial inequities against people of color.

Discrimination

The unfair and unjustifiable treatment of individuals or groups based on (but not limited to) their race, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, social class, physical ability or attributes, religious or ethical values system, national origin, and political beliefs.

News

Image Alt Text Here
News Spotlight

Meet the Founding Associate Dean for Inclusive Excellence

In August 2021, the Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing welcomed its Founding Associate Dean for Inclusive Excellence Dian Squire. A Rambler himself, Squire earned his PhD in Higher Education from Loyola in 2015, during which he led multiple initiatives to address issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion.

READ MORE
Image Alt Text Here
News Spotlight

Understanding the true meaning of patient care

In spring 2020, Peggy and Tom created a generous endowment, which will fund scholarships for students in the BSN Pathway, a new program the School of Nursing developed in partnership with Loyola’s Arrupe College.

READ MORE

Inclusive Excellence

A transformative approach to educating nurses, healthcare teams, and our communities to be more diverse, inclusive, equitable, and anti-racist.

THE MARCELLA NIEHOFF SCHOOL OF NURSING is committed to ensuring that our nursing students and educators are engaging in anti-racist actions to build a more socially-just world. Aligning with, and innovating beyond, the National Academies of Science, Engineering, Medicine’s The Future of Nursing 2020-2030 report, we have dedicated resources, time, and energy to educate students, faculty, staff, and our surrounding communities to be more diverse, inclusive, equitable, and anti-racist. We will accomplish this goal through a comprehensive approach guided by the tenets of Inclusive Excellence: intrapersonal awareness, interpersonal awareness, curriculum transformation, inclusive pedagogy, and inclusive learning environments.

Inclusive Excellence requires us to build equity-minded leadership capacity where all members of the School of Nursing recognize patterns of inequity, take responsibility for student success and outcomes, and take a race-conscious, socio-historical understanding of exclusionary practices in nursing and nursing education.

Our guiding principles:

  • Implement a vision and strategy that supports evidence-based and equitable initiatives to recruit, retain, and increase success for historically marginalized and underrepresented students, faculty, and staff.
  • Develop and sustain inclusive and representative educational learning environments.
  • Create and change policy to institutionalize these principles.
  • Become a national leader and model for inclusive excellence and anti-racism in nursing education.

Resources

Anti-racist actions and thoughts require us to understand how racially diverse groups experience society and how systemic inequity requires us all to take actions to eradicate those systems. Explore our many resources to learn more about anti-racist initiatives and practices at Loyola and beyond. 

Books and articles

Contact Us

Dian Squire, PhD

Founding Associate Dean for Inclusive Excellence

Faculty photo for Dian Squire 200x200

Programs

Jessica Martinez stands in her nursing scrubs outside Arrupe College on Loyola's Water Tower Campus

CARE Pathway to BSN

Short for Collaboration, Access, Resources, and Equity (CARE), this Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) grant program aims to increase the representation of and success of Black and Latinx nursing students by creating a supported pathway from Loyola’s Arrupe College to the Loyola Nursing.

READ MORE
Students participate in a telehealth simulation in the Walgreens Family Virtual Hospital on the Health Sciences Campus

Gender in Nursing

What is gender identity? Gender expression? Gender neutral and gender affirming pronouns? This mini-series of programs will help faculty and staff learn about how to understand the diversity of gender and how to build the most inclusive learning environments for all students. (Coming soon!)

Image Alt Text Here

Book Clubs

Built around three curricula titled "Stories, Critical Perspectives, and Praxis," students, faculty, and staff are invited to build a learning community to explore intersectional human narratives, hone their criticality around understanding systems of oppression, and learn how to implement more socially just pedagogy into their own work. (Coming soon!)

Support Inclusive Excellence at the School of Nursing. Give Today!

Definitions

The School of Nursing's Inclusive Excellence Task Force has defined several important terms to establish a shared lexicon for faculty, staff, and students. Important to understanding these terms is that they all must be understood together and in relationship with each other.

Diversity

Defined broadly, diversity refers to the vast array of salient, socially constructed, and value-laden identities across humankind, inclusive of but not limited to age, citizenship, class, color, disability, gender identity and expression, national origin, race, religion, and sexual identity. More specifically, diversity refers to historically oppressed and marginalized groups who because of oppressive social systems are underrepresented in U.S. higher education.  

Inclusion

Inclusion refers to how institutional practices, policies, and habits transform to include diverse people and perspectives, especially those from historically oppressed groups. The ongoing and adaptive practice of inclusion impacts campus culture and climate.

Equity

The process of modifying practices that have intentionally disadvantaged a particular group so that all people in that group have an equal opportunity to thrive, succeed, and reach their goals. The process is ongoing, requiring us to recognize that we do not all start from the same place and must acknowledge and adjust to imbalances arising from oppressive social systems. 

Intersectionality

The interconnected nature of social systems inclusive of but not limited to ageism, xenophobia, classism, colorism, ableism, heteronormativity, racism, religious oppression, and transantagonism. These systems create overlapping and interdependent systems of oppression that help explain the complexity of human experiences.

Equality

Every individual has the same opportunity to make the most of their lives and talents. Equality is the distribution of the same resources and opportunities to every individual across a population. Equality aims to promote  fairness and must be paired with equitable practices. To have equal systems, all people should be treated fairly, unhampered by stereotypes, biases, or prejudices. 

Social Justice

Social justice entails identifying and contesting social policy and processes in which power and privilege  create inequitable outcomes for marginalized groups that inhibit their democratic empowerment, health equity, health access, and civil and human rights. When injustices occur, the aim is to identify solutions to remove systemic barriers and create equitable access and opportunities for all.

Antiracism

Ongoing actions against racial hatred, bias, systemic racism, and the oppression of historically oppressed and minoritized groups. Anti-racist work institutionalizes policy and programs that address racism. 

Microaggression

The everyday verbal, nonverbal, and environmental slights, snubs, or insults, whether intentional or unintentional, which communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative messages to target persons based solely upon their marginalized group membership. 

Implicit Bias

Attitudes, beliefs, prejudices, and stereotypes that are activated without awareness or intentional control that may impact our understanding, actions, or decisions.  

Civility

Civility is treating one another with respect and inherent dignity of human worth through our words and actions. Civility does not mean that we will agree on everything or that our disagreements can hide behind “niceness”; rather civility includes listening, acknowledging, valuing, and collaborating without degrading someone else in the process. 

Systemic Racism

Any embedded policies, laws, practices, and social and cultural norms that perpetuate and sanction racial inequities against people of color.

Discrimination

The unfair and unjustifiable treatment of individuals or groups based on (but not limited to) their race, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, social class, physical ability or attributes, religious or ethical values system, national origin, and political beliefs.


News

Image Alt Text Here
News Spotlight

Meet the Founding Associate Dean for Inclusive Excellence

In August 2021, the Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing welcomed its Founding Associate Dean for Inclusive Excellence Dian Squire. A Rambler himself, Squire earned his PhD in Higher Education from Loyola in 2015, during which he led multiple initiatives to address issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion.

READ MORE
Image Alt Text Here
News Spotlight

Understanding the true meaning of patient care

In spring 2020, Peggy and Tom created a generous endowment, which will fund scholarships for students in the BSN Pathway, a new program the School of Nursing developed in partnership with Loyola’s Arrupe College.

READ MORE