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Chicago-Torino Lab

Photo Credit: German Marshall Fund of the United States

 The German Marshall Fund (GMF) Chicago-Torino Lab is a partnership between municipal delegations in Chicago, Illinois and Torino, Italy through the GMF Cities office. The peer learning and exchange of ideas with the two delegations seeks to deepen understanding of and appreciation for the effects of segregation by race and/or ethnicity in efforts to explore how to build, strengthen or bolster policy and practice responses to un-design segregation.

This partnership compares and contrasts socio-spatial segregation in two cities with the ultimate aim to create anti-racist municipal policies to improve the lives of populations who have otherwise been marginalized by the cities structural design, policies, and practices. The team working on this project published a Literature Synthesis, a brochure on City Profiles, and a final Report. Please read through our data and reports below! 

The Institute for Racial Justice offers the delegations comparative research analyses on socio-spatial segregation to advance these efforts. A team of undergraduate student researchers and IRJ staff worked on a series of research projects beginning in Fall 2021 through Spring 2023.

Publications

The first two publications reviewed the literature on socio-spatial segregation and the how different cities are working to make their cities more equitable living spaces. The third publication exposes the lived experiences about daily life in racially segregated Chicago. The IRJ team would like to thank the dozens of city leaders and community members who shared about the knotted challenges that they experience in access and use of city services and infrastructure. Depending on their racial, ethnic, gender, immigration, religious, parental, socio-economic, and employment statuses, these daily challenges look different.  

CTL City Profiles Brochure

In addition to Chicago and Torino, cities across the world are working to un-design their socio-spatial segregation. Find out how the history of the city intersects with the challenges in Detroit, Evanston, Hong Kong, Madrid, Miami, Milan, and St. Louis. This brochure summarizes all of them.

Literature Synthesis

The history of discrimination, migration, industrialization, and government shape what socio-spatial segregation looks like today. This literature synthesis reviews this history and shares some of the earlier research on the depth of socio-segregation as well as what policies, practices, and changes were implemented to reinforce segregation or attempt to alleviate it. Read more.

CTL White Paper

Throughout the summer and fall of 2022, the team contacted local officials, as well as members of marginalized communities within the city of Chicago to conduct a series of focus groups and interviews. The focus groups and interviews were a hybrid mix of being conducted in person and via Zoom. All participants were completely voluntary and were given a gift card in exchange for their time if they chose. The research team took notes during each session and took those notes as well as the transcript of each session into the coding software NVivo 12. Every code was then combined by a researcher based on their similar themes into one file, which was used as data to support our report.  Read the CTL Knots of Socio-Spatial Segregation Report  here. 

Photo Credit: German Marshall Fund of the United States

 The German Marshall Fund (GMF) Chicago-Torino Lab is a partnership between municipal delegations in Chicago, Illinois and Torino, Italy through the GMF Cities office. The peer learning and exchange of ideas with the two delegations seeks to deepen understanding of and appreciation for the effects of segregation by race and/or ethnicity in efforts to explore how to build, strengthen or bolster policy and practice responses to un-design segregation.

This partnership compares and contrasts socio-spatial segregation in two cities with the ultimate aim to create anti-racist municipal policies to improve the lives of populations who have otherwise been marginalized by the cities structural design, policies, and practices. The team working on this project published a Literature Synthesis, a brochure on City Profiles, and a final Report. Please read through our data and reports below! 

The Institute for Racial Justice offers the delegations comparative research analyses on socio-spatial segregation to advance these efforts. A team of undergraduate student researchers and IRJ staff worked on a series of research projects beginning in Fall 2021 through Spring 2023.

Publications

The first two publications reviewed the literature on socio-spatial segregation and the how different cities are working to make their cities more equitable living spaces. The third publication exposes the lived experiences about daily life in racially segregated Chicago. The IRJ team would like to thank the dozens of city leaders and community members who shared about the knotted challenges that they experience in access and use of city services and infrastructure. Depending on their racial, ethnic, gender, immigration, religious, parental, socio-economic, and employment statuses, these daily challenges look different.