×
Skip to main content

Panel 1

The Impacts of Climate Change on Global Food Security

9 a.m. - 10:30 a.m., Friday, March 15
Sister Jean Multipurpose Room South, Damen Student Center

This panel will address critical questions about how climate change will impact global food production, including how extreme weather events related to climate change could impact traditional agricultural practices. The panel will discuss what climate projections for the 21st century tell us about risks to food security globally and which regions will feel the most significant impact. The panelists will also explore how science can inform agricultural practices and reduce vulnerabilities caused by climate change by employing seasonal to sub-seasonal forecasting, remote sensing, and data science.

Panelists

Elisabeth Kago Ilboudo Nébié 

Assistant Professor
School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University  

Elisabeth Ilboudo Nébié, PhD, is an assistant professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change and the Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science at Arizona State University.   

She is interested in understanding the human dimensions of environmental change, specifically the interactions between climate adaptation and food and water insecurity. Most of her research has focused on the Sahel region of West Africa, more precisely, Senegal and her home country of Burkina Faso.  

Trained as an anthropologist and an international development practitioner, Ilboudo Nébié is interested in applied research that integrates ethnography with spatial and participatory methods to impact policy and sustainable development efforts. As part of this engagement, she has worked with the International Development Research Centre, the International Livestock Research Institute, and the International Research Institute for Climate and Society. She has also collaborated with UNESCO, UNFCCC, and the World Food Programme. 

Jonas Jägermeyr

Associate Research Scientist
Center for Climate Systems Research (CCSR), Columbia Climate School 

Affiliated with NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Germany

Jonas Jägermeyr, PhD, is a climate change scientist and crop modeler. He studies food systems and global food security at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, The Earth Institute at Columbia University, and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). As a central initiative within the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP), he co-leads AgGRID and the Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison (GGCMI). He is also the coordinator of the agriculture sector in ISIMIP, a cross-sectoral model intercomparison project.  

Using global mechanistic crop modeling, Jägermeyr addresses questions related to climate change impacts on agricultural systems, the role of extreme weather events, end-of-season yield forecasting systems, developing pathways for attaining sustainable development goals, and how to feed 10 billion people within environmental limits. A recent project advanced the understanding of the implications of a regional nuclear conflict for global food productivity, trade, and availability.  

In close collaboration with the international crop modeling community, Jägermeyr's research activity utilizes and advances an assessment framework based on an ensemble of integrated global crop modeling systems. Leveraging large-scale computational infrastructure, remote sensing, novel historical and future climate datasets, and other data assimilation, he works towards an operational yet flexible framework to improve the understanding of food system vulnerabilities and adaptation capacities targeting more sustainable future food systems. 

Paris Collingsworth  

Associate Research Professor
Purdue University, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources
Great Lakes Ecosystem Specialist, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant  

Paris Collingsworth received his PhD in aquatic ecology from Ohio State University in 2009, followed by a post-doctoral research position at the University of Michigan and the USGS Great Lakes Science Center. Collingsworth’s research focuses on the effects of anthropogenic stressors on food web interactions and fish population dynamics in freshwater ecosystems, with a particular emphasis on the Laurentian Great Lakes of North America. Through his position with Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant, Dr. Collingsworth seeks to improve access to and sharing of Great Lakes environmental data to develop indicators of ecosystem health. He will discuss how climate change impacts Great Lakes fisheries. 

Asher Siebert

Applied Climate Scientist  

Asher Siebert, PhD, is an applied climate scientist with a background in climate extremes scenario analysis, seasonal climate forecasting, index insurance, and forecast-based financing for early humanitarian response to natural disasters, particularly in Africa. He has had postdoctoral positions at Columbia University's International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) (2016-2019) and the Princeton Environmental Institute (2015-16). Siebert holds a PhD in Geography from Rutgers University, an MA in Climate and Society from Columbia University, and a BA in Geosciences from Princeton University. In the autumn of 2023, he was a ClimateBase Fellow. Asher was an employee of Columbia University's IRI from 2016 to 2022, when he traveled to Africa six times. Siebert's talk will address some of the central climate-related challenges to food security and the role that forecasting and financial innovation can play in addressing these risks.&nbsp

The Impacts of Climate Change on Global Food Security

9 a.m. - 10:30 a.m., Friday, March 15
Sister Jean Multipurpose Room South, Damen Student Center

This panel will address critical questions about how climate change will impact global food production, including how extreme weather events related to climate change could impact traditional agricultural practices. The panel will discuss what climate projections for the 21st century tell us about risks to food security globally and which regions will feel the most significant impact. The panelists will also explore how science can inform agricultural practices and reduce vulnerabilities caused by climate change by employing seasonal to sub-seasonal forecasting, remote sensing, and data science.

Panelists

Elisabeth Kago Ilboudo Nébié 

Assistant Professor
School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University  

Elisabeth Ilboudo Nébié, PhD, is an assistant professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change and the Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science at Arizona State University.   

She is interested in understanding the human dimensions of environmental change, specifically the interactions between climate adaptation and food and water insecurity. Most of her research has focused on the Sahel region of West Africa, more precisely, Senegal and her home country of Burkina Faso.  

Trained as an anthropologist and an international development practitioner, Ilboudo Nébié is interested in applied research that integrates ethnography with spatial and participatory methods to impact policy and sustainable development efforts. As part of this engagement, she has worked with the International Development Research Centre, the International Livestock Research Institute, and the International Research Institute for Climate and Society. She has also collaborated with UNESCO, UNFCCC, and the World Food Programme. 

Jonas Jägermeyr

Associate Research Scientist
Center for Climate Systems Research (CCSR), Columbia Climate School 

Affiliated with NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Germany

Jonas Jägermeyr, PhD, is a climate change scientist and crop modeler. He studies food systems and global food security at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, The Earth Institute at Columbia University, and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). As a central initiative within the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP), he co-leads AgGRID and the Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison (GGCMI). He is also the coordinator of the agriculture sector in ISIMIP, a cross-sectoral model intercomparison project.  

Using global mechanistic crop modeling, Jägermeyr addresses questions related to climate change impacts on agricultural systems, the role of extreme weather events, end-of-season yield forecasting systems, developing pathways for attaining sustainable development goals, and how to feed 10 billion people within environmental limits. A recent project advanced the understanding of the implications of a regional nuclear conflict for global food productivity, trade, and availability.  

In close collaboration with the international crop modeling community, Jägermeyr's research activity utilizes and advances an assessment framework based on an ensemble of integrated global crop modeling systems. Leveraging large-scale computational infrastructure, remote sensing, novel historical and future climate datasets, and other data assimilation, he works towards an operational yet flexible framework to improve the understanding of food system vulnerabilities and adaptation capacities targeting more sustainable future food systems. 

Paris Collingsworth  

Associate Research Professor
Purdue University, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources
Great Lakes Ecosystem Specialist, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant  

Paris Collingsworth received his PhD in aquatic ecology from Ohio State University in 2009, followed by a post-doctoral research position at the University of Michigan and the USGS Great Lakes Science Center. Collingsworth’s research focuses on the effects of anthropogenic stressors on food web interactions and fish population dynamics in freshwater ecosystems, with a particular emphasis on the Laurentian Great Lakes of North America. Through his position with Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant, Dr. Collingsworth seeks to improve access to and sharing of Great Lakes environmental data to develop indicators of ecosystem health. He will discuss how climate change impacts Great Lakes fisheries. 

Asher Siebert

Applied Climate Scientist  

Asher Siebert, PhD, is an applied climate scientist with a background in climate extremes scenario analysis, seasonal climate forecasting, index insurance, and forecast-based financing for early humanitarian response to natural disasters, particularly in Africa. He has had postdoctoral positions at Columbia University's International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) (2016-2019) and the Princeton Environmental Institute (2015-16). Siebert holds a PhD in Geography from Rutgers University, an MA in Climate and Society from Columbia University, and a BA in Geosciences from Princeton University. In the autumn of 2023, he was a ClimateBase Fellow. Asher was an employee of Columbia University's IRI from 2016 to 2022, when he traveled to Africa six times. Siebert's talk will address some of the central climate-related challenges to food security and the role that forecasting and financial innovation can play in addressing these risks.&nbsp