Loyola University Chicago

Department of English

Course Schedules

The courses listed here are the introductory and advanced workshops that fulfill the creative writing concentration. For a full list of English Department undergraduate courses, see here.

Fall 2020
Spring 2021 
Fall 2021
Spring 2022

 

Fall 2020 Courses

ENGL 317 The Writing of Poetry

Section: 001   #1625
Instructor: A. Baker
3.0 credit hours Seminar
M 4:15–6:45 PM LSC

This course offers practice and instruction in the techniques and analysis of poetry through reading, writing, discussing, and revising poems. We will give particular attention to the unique challenges and opportunities facing beginning poets as we first seek to channel our ideas and life experiences into poetry, to find and then develop our own voices in relation to not only our own impulses but to "the tradition" and the aesthetically diverse and fascinating world of contemporary poetry. The poems you write will be carefully read and critiqued by both your classmates and the instructor. The culmination of the course will be to compile a portfolio of the work you have written over the term.

Section: 002    #2574
Instructor: L. Goldstein
3.0 credit hours Seminar
W 2:45–5:15 PM LSC

This course approaches the writing of poetry as both a study and craft that requires reading, exploration, practice, and sharing. We read a unique work of contemporary poetry each week as a framework for discussion, but the core of the course is student writing. The workshop element of the course is focused on experimentation with language to foster each student’s own creativity and delight in creating work both as a group and on their own. Our work includes in-class collective and collaborative writing experiments, prompts for writing in between sessions, and presentations of student poetry for review by the group. Students produce a final collection of poetry in a self-published chapbook and give a reading of their work for the final.

Section: 003   #4616
Instructor: P. Sorenson
3.0 credit hours Seminar
F 2:45–5:15 PM LSC

This course aligns poetry writing with the reading of poetry and the exploration of poetic practices both old and new. Through outside reading, students will question their relationships to contemporary modes and cultures. Thus, students will further develop their own voices, styles, and methods of production, and they will begin to situate their craft in the larger poetic world. Weekly class meetings will center on discussions and presentations of outside materials, in-class writing and writing experiments, discussions of student-generated poetry, and collaborative writing.  In addition to regular writing assignments and in-class presentations, students will develop a portfolio by semester’s end. 

 

ENGL 318   The Writing of Fiction

Section: 001   #2241
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Seminar
M 2:45–5:15 PM LSC

 

Section: 003   #4618
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Seminar
W 2:45–5:15 PM LSC

 

Section: 004   #5808
Instructor: H. Axelrod
3.0 credit hours Seminar
F 2:45-5:15 PM LSC

This is a workshop class in fiction. Students will learn to become better readers and writers of fiction by learning how to attend to structure, character, imagery, dialogue and other craft elements as we analyze how writers such as Jamaica Kincaid, Denis Johnson, Jhumpa Lahiri, and others create stories that resonate with the stories of our own lives. What makes a character stay with us? What makes a metaphor work? What makes dialogue sound believable? What is the difference between suspense and surprise?

Students will write three original short stories, and will learn how to critique each other’s stories in class as part of a supportive workshop environment. Class participation is emphasized. Fulfills a Core Expressive Arts Requirement.

 

Section: 600   #4617
Instructor: M. Meinhardt
3.0 credit hours Seminar
T 7:00–9:30 PM LSC

This advanced writing workshop for fiction will explore traditional and contemporary flash fiction, short story, and novel (chapter) forms. Vocabulary, criticism, genre, and rhetoric will fuel a keen attention to the dynamics of both reading and writing fiction for personal and perhaps even artistic purposes. Character engagement, tone, and structural awareness will guide the development of each writer’s ‘voice’ through the development of creative writing designed to both explore and perform on the page. All students will write flash fiction and short story forms, but the novel start (or chapter) is optional. Old and new classics start the class off, but we shift very quickly to student writing and finish with attention to publication awareness and preparation. This workshop develops both new and experienced writers of fiction and satisfies the core expressive arts requirement!

 

ENGL 319 Writing Creative Nonfiction

Section: 001   #2873
Instructor: N. Kenney Johnstone
3.0 credit hours Seminar
W 2:45–5:15 PM LSC

The Importance of the Personal Essay

Personal essays allow writers to share unique experiences while communicating universal truths. They also have the power to spark important conversations and foster awareness. In this class, students will study and write five different forms of the personal essay. By reading and analyzing contemporary published models, students will deepen their learning of traditional and innovative creative nonfiction methods. Students will then write creative nonfiction pieces and participate in workshops of their classmates' writing.​ 

Section: 002   #5809
Instructor: H. Axelrod
3.0 credit hours Seminar
R 2:30–5:00 PM LSC

This is a workshop course in creative nonfiction, the fastest growing genre in publishing. It’s thriving in personal essay columns in magazines and newspapers, in memoirs, and in new hybrid forms. We’ll focus on personal essay and memoir, learning how to write about moments, activities, and relationships in your lives that have given you pause, stayed with you, and left you with questions. Among other craft elements, you’ll learn the distinction between I-narrator and I-character, between exposition and scene, and how to move from the situation—the facts of what happened—to finding insight and meaning through story.

In class, we’ll read, analyze, and discuss the works of creative nonfiction writers as models for your own writing. This is a workshop, so you’ll hear from each other what’s working on the page in your own writing and what isn’t—which will help develop your ear as you read and your instincts as you write. You’ll also learn to offer thoughtful commentary on the work of your classmates. The goal is for you to become a better reader and writer of creative nonfiction.

 

ENGL 397 Advanced Writing Workshop: Poetry

Section: 01W #1718
Instructor: A. Baker
3.0 credit hours Seminar
T 2:45- 5:15 PM

In this advanced poetry workshop, we will seek to deepen our engagement with poetry as an art form—both as readers and writers. Through reading, writing, and workshopping, we will grow more familiar with the anatomy and texture of poetry: image, word, voice, syntactical configurations, rhetorical devices— stanza, line, punctuation, and page. Your work will be given a great deal of individual attention in our workshops, and you will be offered the opportunity to work very closely with the instructor as you write and revise your final project for the course—a portfolio of your best work.

ENGL 397-01W #1718 is a writing intensive class.

 

Spring 2021 Courses

ENGL 317 The Writing of Poetry

Section: 001   #1312
Instructor: A. Baker
3.0 credit hours Seminar
T 2:30–5:00 PM LSC

Section: 002    #1313
Instructor: L. Goldstein
3.0 credit hours Seminar
W 2:45–5:15 PM LSC

Section: 003   #4466
Instructor: P. Sorenson
3.0 credit hours Seminar
F 2:45–5:15 PM LSC

 

ENGL 318   The Writing of Fiction

Section: 001   #1314
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Seminar
M 2:45–5:15 PM LSC

Section: 002   #2185
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Seminar
W 2:45–5:15 PM LSC

Section: 600   #2186
Instructor: M. Meinhardt
3.0 credit hours Seminar
T 7:00–9:30 PM LSC

 

ENGL 319 Writing Creative Nonfiction

Section: 001   #1813
Instructor: H. Axelrod
3.0 credit hours Seminar
R 2:30–5:00 PM LSC

Section: 001   #5128
Instructor: N. Kenney Johnstone
3.0 credit hours Seminar
W 2:45–5:15 PM LSC

 

ENGL 392 Advanced Creative Nonfiction

Section: 01W #3365
Instructor: H. Axelrod
3.0 credit hours Seminar
M 2:45–5:15 PM LSC

 

ENGL 398 Advanced Writing: Fiction

Section: 01W #1342
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 2:45 PM – 5:15 PM LSC
 

 

Fall 2021 Courses

 

ENGL 317    The Writing of Poetry 

Section: 001 #1581 
Instructor: A. Baker 
3.0 credit hours Seminar 
M 5:30–8:00 PM  Online/LSC 

Section: 002 #2404 
Instructor: L. Goldstein 
3.0 credit hours Seminar 
W 5:30–8:00 PM  LSC 

 

ENGL 318    The Writing of Fiction 

Section: 001 #2113 
Instructor: V. Popa 
3.0 credit hours Seminar 
M 5:30–8:00 PM  LSC 

Section: 002 #3931 
Instructor: M. Meinhardt 
3.0 credit hours Seminar 
5:30–8:00 PM  LSC

Section: 003 #4613 
Instructor: H. Axelrod 
3.0 credit hours Seminar 
F 5:30–8:00 PM  Online/LSC 

Section: 601 #3930 
Instructor: M. Hawkins 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
W 5:30–8:00 PM  LSC 

 

ENGL 319    Writing Creative Nonfiction 

Section: 001 #2664 
Instructor: N. Kenney Johnstone 
3.0 credit hours Seminar 
W 5:30–8:00 PM LSC 

Section: 002 #4614 
Instructor: H. Axelrod 
3.0 credit hours Seminar 
R 5:30–8:00 PM  LSC 

 

ENGL 397   Advanced Writing: Poetry 

Section: 18W #1657 
Instructor: A. Baker 
3.0 credit hours Seminar 
T 5:30–8:00 PM  Online/LSC

 

 

Spring 2022 Courses

 

ENGL 317    The Writing of Poetry 

Section: 001 #1329
Instructor: A. Baker 
3.0 credit hours  Seminar 
T 2:30–5:00 PM  LSC 

In this class, we will give a great deal of attention to the unique challenges and opportunities facing beginning poets as we first seek to channel our ideas and life experiences into poetry, to find and then develop our own voices in relation to not only our own impulses but to "the tradition" and the aesthetically diverse and fascinating world of contemporary poetry. The poems you write will be carefully read and critiqued by both your classmates and the instructor. The culmination of the course will be to compile a portfolio of the work you have written over the term.

 

Section: 002 #1330
Instructor: L. Goldstein
3.0 credit hours  Seminar 
W 2:45–5:15 PM  LSC 

Writing poetry is a craft that requires reading, exploration, practice, and sharing. Each week we read a unique work of contemporary poetry mostly by POC and queer writers to form a framework for discussion about vulnerable points of view and innovative forms. From there, students are encouraged to find their own process, form and voice. In our sessions, we experiment with language together to discover and foster creativity and delight in creating work both as a group and on our own. Our work also includes prompts for writing in between sessions, and presentations of student poetry for review by the group. Finally, students spend several weeks compiling and reviewing final collections of poetry for a self-published chapbook, and for the final, give a reading of their work.

 

Section: 003 #3760
Instructor: P. Sorenson
3.0 credit hours  Seminar 
F 2:45–5:15 PM  LSC 

This course aligns poetry writing with the reading of poetry and the exploration of poetic practices both old and new. Through outside reading, students will question their relationships to contemporary modes and cultures. Thus, students will further develop their own voices, styles, and methods of production, and they will begin to situate their craft in the larger poetic world. Weekly class meetings will center on discussions and presentations of outside materials, in-class writing and writing experiments, discussions of student-generated poetry, and collaborative writing.  In addition to regular writing assignments and in-class presentations, students will develop a twenty-page chapbook by semester’s end. 

 

ENGL 318    The Writing of Fiction 

Section: 001 #1331
Instructor: V. Popa 
3.0 credit hours  Seminar 
M 4:15–6:45 PM  LSC 

This course explores the art and techniques of writing fiction; how and why it succeeds in capturing the imagination of readers, and how those skills can be channeled successfully to craft new and original work. This course will include a combination of craft lessons and workshop critique. We will investigate the output of a diverse cast of authors, from Francois Rabelais and Laurence Sterne to Denis Johnson and Danyial Mueenuddin. From these works, we will then distill valuable lessons about the writing of fiction, such as character development, dialogue, plot, and tension, which students will then apply to their own compositions. Assignments include two original works of short fiction (either short stories or novel excerpts) and a final portfolio (which will include revisions of workshopped assignments).   

Course Goals:

This introductory Creative Writing course requires you to develop the following skills:

  • Using a variety of techniques to craft original drafts of short fiction;
  • Critiquing your own and other’s work in the workshop setting;
  • Performing close readings of published and unpublished fiction;
  • Engaging with the process of writing as an ongoing and plastic development  

  

 

Section: 002 #2128
Instructor: M. Hawkins 
3.0 credit hours  Seminar 
W 4:15–6:45 PM  LSC 

In this fiction writing workshop students will read, write, revise and critique short fiction with the aim of becoming better writers and readers.  Workshops will be rigorous and respectful, with the understanding that analysis of other writers’ craft teaches us to hone our own.

Every week we will read and discuss short stories by master writers; most weeks students will read and discuss each others’ stories, too. Every week students will write. In addition to three completed stories assigned as homework, students will do in-class writing exercises designed to create momentum, generate ideas and explore technique. Class discussions will focus on craft as well as concept, with particular attention paid to structure, character development, dialog, voice, tone and imagery.  Again and again, we will ask of each other and ourselves: What works, what doesn’t, why, and how can it be made better?

Section: 600 #2129
Instructor: M. Meinhardt
3.0 credit hours  Seminar 
T 7:00–9:15 PM  LSC

This advanced writing workshop for fiction will explore traditional and contemporary flash fiction, short story, and novel (chapter) forms. Vocabulary, criticism, genre, and rhetoric will fuel a keen attention to the dynamics of both reading and writing fiction for personal and perhaps even artistic purposes. Character engagement, tone, and structural awareness will guide the development of each writer’s ‘voice’ through the development of creative writing designed to both explore and perform on the page. All students will write flash fiction and short story forms, but the novel start (or chapter) is optional. Old and new classics start the class off, but we shift very quickly to student writing and finish with attention to publication awareness and preparation. This workshop develops both new and experienced writers of fiction and satisfies the core expressive arts requirement!

 

 

ENGL 319    Writing Creative Nonfiction 

Section: 001 #1792
Instructor:V. Rendel
3.0 credit hours  Seminar 
R 7:00–9:30 PM LSC 

Telling the truth doesn’t have to be boring. This course will provide an overview of traditional and hybrid genres of creative nonfiction (including literary journalism, memoir, biography, essays, humor and travel writing) by authors from Maya Angelou to Tobias Wolff. Students are encouraged to experiment with a variety of formats, including graphic art, podcasts, videos, and micro essays. We’ll also hear directly from successful authors who can answer questions about every stage of the writing and publication process, from finding inspiration to landing a book deal. Students should be prepared to participate in writing workshops, and to submit at least one original creative nonfiction piece to a publication outlet of their choice (ideally one that pays).

 

Section: 002 #4120
Instructor: C. Macon Fleischer
3.0 credit hours  Seminar 
W 7:00–9:30 PM LSC 

 

ENGL 392    Advanced Creative Nonfiction

Section: 01W #4949
Instructor: H. Axelrod
3.0 credit hours Seminar
R  2:30–5:00 PM  LSC

In this advanced workshop in creative nonfiction, we’ll develop a keen sense of craft by reading each other’s work and the work of some of the finest writers in the genre, including Joan Didion, Vladimir Nabokov, Maggie Nelson, Eula Biss, Olivia Laing, and Leslie Jamison.  We’ll pay particular attention to questions of voice, narrative distance, narrative immediacy, personal research, hybrids, concept essays, dialogue, and story.  We’ll also have Skype visits from established authors working in the field, who will be willing to answer your questions about everything from writing habits to publishing.  Through writing, reading, and workshopping, we’ll work to build a common vocabulary and orientation in the genre, and you’ll also be working to develop your own individual orientation, so that you become more comfortable and innovative as a writer.