Loyola University Chicago

Department of English

Fall 2021 Courses

 

UCLR 100E Interpreting Literature 
ENGL 210 Business Writing 
ENGL 211 Writing for Pre-Law Students 
ENGL 220 Theory/Practice Tutoring 
ENGL 271 Exploring Poetry 
ENGL 272 Exploring Drama 
ENGL 273 Exploring Fiction 
ENGL 274 Exploring Shakespeare 
ENGL 282C African-American Literature 
ENGL 283 Women in Literature 
ENGL 288 Nature in Literature 
ENGL 290 Human Values in Literature 
ENGL 293 Advanced Composition 
ENGL 312 Studies in World Literature
ENGL 317 The Writing of Poetry 
ENGL 318 The Writing of Fiction 
ENGL 319 Writing Creative Nonfiction 
ENGL 325  British Literature: The Renaissance
ENGL 326 Studies in Shakespeare 
ENGL 335  British Literature: The Romantic Period 
ENGL 345 British Literature: 20th Century 
ENGL 354 Contemporary Critical Theory 
ENGL 375 American Literature to 1865 
ENGL 384B  Studies in African-American Literature 
ENGL 390 Advanced Seminar 
ENGL 393 Teaching English to Adults 
ENGL 394 Internship 
ENGL 397   Advanced Writing: Poetry
ENGL 399 Special Studies in Literature 

 

 

UCLR 100E  Interpreting Literature 

Section: 001 # 3843 
Instructor: B. Jacob 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 8:10–9:00 AM  LSC 

Literary Hauntings  

What does it mean to be haunted? Whether the haunting occurs through a supernatural figure, ghosts of historical pasts, or the phantasms of our own mind; the reoccurrence of the spectrum can be all-encompassing. This course will use the literary genres of poetry, short stories, novels, plays, and films to grapple with the conditions that create ghosts in our lives. We will be reading and watching these texts to work through how trauma, grief, nostalgia, desire, and white supremacy produce forces that haunt our perceptions of the world around us.  

UCLR 100E will serve as a foundational course for future literary studies at LUC and beyond. You will be galvanizing your interpretive skills through a variety of literary approaches, terms, and methodologies. These analytical engagements will take place through close reading, blog posts, short essays, collaborations, discussions, and a final exam.  

Short stories by Herman Melville, James Joyce, Octavia Butler, Nnedi Okorafor, Ted Chiang  
Novels by Toni Morrison and Junot Diaz  
Plays by August Wilson, Suzan-Lori Parks, Jeremy O. Harris  
Poetry by William Shakespeare, Emily Dickinson, Claudia Rankine, Danez Smith  
Films by Guillermo del Toro, Robert Eggers, Jordan Peele  

Section: 002 #5234 
Instructor: B. Molby 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 8:10–9:00 AM  LSC 

After our experiences of the pandemic over the past year, this course will challenge literature to put its money where its mouth is.  If literature is understood to be a unique mode of transmitting and interpreting knowledge and human experience through creative linguistic expression, then literature can make a uniquely valuable contribution to our own understanding and experience of times of plague, illness, and loss. 

We will read and examine texts such as Boccaccio’s The Decameron, Daniel Defoe’s A Journal of A Plague Year, Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death,” William Morris’s The Earthly Paradise, and Susan Sontag’s “AIDS and Its Metaphors,” and in the process discuss how past texts have presented plague, contagion, illness, isolation, and social fragmentation, but also how they provide opportunities for finding consolation and community through the shared experience of narrative. 

Section: 004 #5236 
Instructor: E. Weeks Stogner 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 9:301-0:20 AM  LSC 

Women and the Home 

This foundational course in literary studies will require students to closely read and carefully analyze a representative variety of prose, poetry, and drama; master key literary and critical terms; and explore a variety of core critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature. This course will also explore important conceptual questions about literature and its study in order to help students develop the skills of analysis and interpretation needed to approach literature in a sophisticated manner. 

The theme of this course is women and the domestic sphere, or the home space. Through an examination of literary texts from a wide range of genres and periods, we will explore the varied and rich ways in which authors have represented women’s relationships with the home and its corollary, femininity. Texts covered will include Louisa May Alcott’s Behind a Mask, Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, and a selection of shorter pieces. Course requirements are (1) engaged reading of all assigned texts, demonstrated through annotation assignments and reading quizzes; (2) active class participation; (3) several short writing assignments; and (4) midterm and final exams. 

Section: 005 #5240 
Instructor: E. Bayley 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 10:50–11:40 AM  LSC 

This is a foundational literature course that explores a variety of critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature. In particular, we will be looking at the concepts of dying, death and grieving and discuss how these concepts are depicted in a number of different poems, plays and short stories. We will use texts, by a number of different American authors, such as Audre Lorde, James Baldwin, Alice Walker, Annie Proulx, Amiri Baraka and more, to explore how different authors express the difficult experiences of dying, death and grieving, not only personally but also in a larger social context. The method of assessment will include pop quizzes, papers, and classroom participation.  

Section: 006 #5241 
Instructor: K. Quirk 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 10:50–11:40 AM  LSC 

Crossing Boundaries 

This is a foundational course in literary studies in which we will read works that are about crossing boundaries. We will read works of poetry, drama, and fiction that address boundary crossings and trouble different sorts of boundaries: boundaries between nations, between genders, between the human and the non-human, between the magical and the real, between fiction and non-fiction, and between stories and poems. Readings may include a Greek Tragedy or two, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Toni Morrison’s Beloved, David Henry Hwang’s M. Butterfly, and Claudia Rankine’s Citizen.  Our goals will be to develop a better critical vocabulary and analytical approach to the three genres of poetry, drama, and fiction. The course writing assignments (both formal and informal) will emphasize literary analysis but will also seek to improve general writing skills. More broadly, however, I hope we will all learn to approach literature in a more attentive, engaged, and ultimately pleasurable manner. Ideally, we will not only learn about literature and hone our interpretive skills but will also try to relish the pleasure of reading literature. 

Section: 007 #5242 
Instructor:  S. Lepak 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 12:10 –1:00 PM  LSC 

This foundational course in literary studies will require students to read closely and analyze carefully a representative variety of prose, poetry, and drama. Students will master key literary and critical terms and explore a variety of core critical approaches to conceptual questions about literature and its study. What is literature? What counts? Why does it matter? How has it been conceived in different times and places? How do we envision the relationships among author, text, and audience? What is the difference between reading a literary work in its historical context and in the light of our own contemporary time? Where does meaning come from in literature? What is literary interpretation and what role does it have in the production of literary meaning? How are literary works related to culture and society and how do they reflect – and reflect on – questions of value and the diversity of human experience? Exploring these questions will help students to develop the skills of analysis and interpretation they will need to approach literature in a sophisticated manner.  

Readings will range from historical/canonical to contemporary, focusing on telling and retelling stories from Classical antiquity. Students will read authors such as Homer, Ovid, Aristophanes, Margaret Atwood, H.D., and Madeline Miller. We will use these texts to understand literature as a genre, as well as to practice interpreting and internalizing them in the art of adaptation. Students may be asked to create some small works of prose or poetry themselves in pursuit of greater comprehension and mastery of the texts. 

Section: 008 #5243 
Instructor: L. Goldstien 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 12:10–1:00 PM  LSC 

Utopias and Dystopias 

In this course, we will read, discuss and write about texts and film that explore how the creation of utopias and dytopias form astute social commentary on the present state of the world. With units in the course such as Afrofuturism, White Utopias, and Capitalist dystopias, there is a special focus on social ecologies based in racial and gendered hierarchies in the material and our discussions. We will be reading short stories, novels, plays and poetry as well as viewing films. You will be introduced to multiple strategies to approach and interpret challenging texts through lectures, class discussions, group work and short responses. Materials include: short stories by Octavia Butler, the African film Pumzi, a novel by Richard Brautigan, and the poetry of W.B. Yeats, Harryette Mullen, Douglas Kearney, Ocean Vuong and Khadijah Queen. 

Section: 009 #5244 
Instructor: L. Goldstein 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 1:30–2:20 PM  LSC 

Utopias and Dystopias 

In this course, we will read, discuss and write about texts and film that explore how the creation of utopias and dytopias form astute social commentary on the present state of the world. With units in the course such as Afrofuturism, White Utopias, and Capitalist dystopias, there is a special focus on social ecologies based in racial and gendered hierarchies in the material and our discussions. We will be reading short stories, novels, plays and poetry as well as viewing films. You will be introduced to multiple strategies to approach and interpret challenging texts through lectures, class discussions, group work and short responses. Materials include: short stories by Octavia Butler, the African film Pumzi, a novel by Richard Brautigan, and the poetry of W.B. Yeats, Harryette Mullen, Douglas Kearney, Ocean Vuong and Khadijah Queen. 

Section: 010 #5245 
Instructor: E. Weeks Stogner 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 1:30–2:20 PM  LSC 

Women and the Home 

This foundational course in literary studies will require students to closely read and carefully analyze a representative variety of prose, poetry, and drama; master key literary and critical terms; and explore a variety of core critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature. This course will also explore important conceptual questions about literature and its study in order to help students develop the skills of analysis and interpretation needed to approach literature in a sophisticated manner. 

The theme of this course is women and the domestic sphere, or the home space. Through an examination of literary texts from a wide range of genres and periods, we will explore the varied and rich ways in which authors have represented women’s relationships with the home and its corollary, femininity. Texts covered will include Louisa May Alcott’s Behind a Mask, Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, and a selection of shorter pieces. Course requirements are (1) engaged reading of all assigned texts, demonstrated through annotation assignments and reading quizzes; (2) active class participation; (3) several short writing assignments; and (4) midterm and final exams. 

Section: 012 #5247 
Instructor: E. Bayley 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 2:503:40PM  LSC 

This is a foundational literature course that explores a variety of critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature. In particular, we will be looking at the concepts of dying, death and grieving and discuss how these concepts are depicted in a number of different poems, plays and short stories. We will use texts, by a number of different American authors, such as Audre Lorde, James Baldwin, Alice Walker, Annie Proulx, Amiri Baraka and more, to explore how different authors express the difficult experiences of dying, death and grieving, not only personally but also in a larger social context. The method of assessment will include pop quizzes, papers, and classroom participation.  

Section: 013 #5248 
Instructor: K. Quirk 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 2:503:40PM  LSC 

Crossing Boundaries 

This is a foundational course in literary studies in which we will read works that are about crossing boundaries. We will read works of poetry, drama, and fiction that address boundary crossings and trouble different sorts of boundaries: boundaries between nations, between genders, between the human and the non-human, between the magical and the real, between fiction and non-fiction, and between stories and poems. Readings may include a Greek Tragedy or two, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Toni Morrison’s Beloved, David Henry Hwang’s M. Butterfly, and Claudia Rankine’s Citizen.  Our goals will be to develop a better critical vocabulary and analytical approach to the three genres of poetry, drama, and fiction. The course writing assignments (both formal and informal) will emphasize literary analysis but will also seek to improve general writing skills. More broadly, however, I hope we will all learn to approach literature in a more attentive, engaged, and ultimately pleasurable manner. Ideally, we will not only learn about literature and hone our interpretive skills but will also try to relish the pleasure of reading literature. 

Section: 014 #5249 
Instructor: TBA 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 2:503:40 PM  Online/LSC 

Section: 015 #5250 
Instructor: E. Weeks Stogner 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 2:503:40 PM  LSC 

Women and the Home 

This foundational course in literary studies will require students to closely read and carefully analyze a representative variety of prose, poetry, and drama; master key literary and critical terms; and explore a variety of core critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature. This course will also explore important conceptual questions about literature and its study in order to help students develop the skills of analysis and interpretation needed to approach literature in a sophisticated manner. 

The theme of this course is women and the domestic sphere, or the home space. Through an examination of literary texts from a wide range of genres and periods, we will explore the varied and rich ways in which authors have represented women’s relationships with the home and its corollary, femininity. Texts covered will include Louisa May Alcott’s Behind a Mask, Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, and a selection of shorter pieces. Course requirements are (1) engaged reading of all assigned texts, demonstrated through annotation assignments and reading quizzes; (2) active class participation; (3) several short writing assignments; and (4) midterm and final exams. 

Section: 016 #5251 
Instructor: A. Mitchell 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 4:105:00PM  LSC 

Literature is a way in which we understand our shared human experience more deeply.  Literary interpretation offers us the opportunity to develop skills and strategies to apply to our everyday lives, as we encounter experiences, ideas, and cultures that beg for greater understanding.  In this class, we’ll explore places – specifically, the places of home: comforting, exasperating, laden with meaning and emotion (from bittersweet to hilarious), and sometimes downright horrifying.  Through exploring a diversity of texts – plays, memoir, short stories and essays, graphic novels, and film – we’ll encounter the familiar and the strange of these places we call home.  Through reading, discussion, multimedia projects and writing, students will develop the core skills of literary analysis, by investigating the production and context of these texts, and grappling with them both as historical documents and materials that are fully relevant for our time. 

Section: 017 #5252 
Instructor: J. Jacobs 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 4:105:00 PM  LSC 

Section: 018 #5253 
Instructor: A. Shoplik 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 4:105:00PM  LSC 

The “Outsider” in American Literature 

In this foundational course in literary studies, we’ll get the opportunity to explore and analyze a representative variety of poetry, fiction, and drama together. We’ll familiarize ourselves with key literary and critical terms, and we’ll also try out a variety of critical approaches for interpreting literary texts. Course readings will invite us to explore how authors deploy genre, character, and form to challenge dominant culture’s assumptions about racial, national, sexual, and gender identity. Some of the key questions we’ll be exploring: What does it mean to be an “outsider,” and what exactly makes “outsiders” a threat? Tensions between the individual and the community will be of special interest to us and will prompt questions about how communities are composed. Do communities rely on “outsiders” for inner coherence? Some of the authors who will help us to explore these questions: Emily Dickinson, Langston Hughes, and Maxine Hong Kingston. 

Section: 019 #5254 
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 8:009:15 AM  LSC 

Section: 020 #5255 
Instructor: V. Bell 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 8:009:15 AM  LSC 

Personal and Political Hauntings in American Literature 
 
The foundational course of literary studies requires students to read closely and analyze carefully a representative variety of literary texts, master key literary and critical terms, and explore a variety of core critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature.   
 
This section explores the interpretation of American literary works that are “haunted” by the past.  The essays, novels, memoir, and poems that we will interpret speak in the voices of real or imagined Americans in history, or at least obsessively struggle to represent those voices and earlier events.  The works also focus on complex and uncomfortable, even taboo, American problems—racial conflict, sexual abuse, violence, political upheaval, etc.—but they also explore opportunities for change and for the expansion of freedom.   
 
Course authors may include George Saunders, Jesmyn Ward, Rodney Gomez, Diana Khoi Nguyen, and Jane Addams, among others.  Course requirements include 2 midterm exams and 1 final exam, 2 critical essays, and active class participation, and may include attending a live Chicago Ghost Tour. 

Section: 021 #5256 
Instructor: J. Chamberlin 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 9:4511:00 AM  LSC 

Form and Transformation: What Makes Us Human? 

What makes us human? And what makes someone—or something—inhuman? In this course, students will investigate these questions through compelling works of literature. Drawing from a diverse body of writers from across time periods, this class will explore three genres of literature: poetry, drama, and fiction. We will read fantastical transformation stories about werewolves, vampires, and humans mysteriously turning into animals, as well as stories about other types of bodily and emotional transformations we experience throughout our lifetimes.  

This class will also explore the ways in which our understanding of humanity is complicated by race, gender, disability, and animality. We will ask questions such as: What does language and our identities as readers, writers, and speakers have to do with being human? How does transformation complicate what we understand to be the human form? Students will complete three major assessments—a midterm, a final, and an analytical essay—in addition to short assignments such as reading responses and quizzes. 

Section: 022 #5257 
Instructor: P. Randolph 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 9:4511:00 ALSC 

 

Section: 023 #5258 
Instructor: K. Wisel 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 5:306:45 PLSC 

This foundational course in literary studies will require students to read closely and analyze carefully a representative variety of prose, poetry, and drama, master key literary and critical terms, and explore a variety of core critical approaches to conceptual questions about literature and its study. What is literature? Why does it matter? How has it been conceived in different times and places? How do we envision the relationships among author, text, and reader or audience? What is the difference between reading a literary work in its historical context and in the light of our own contemporary time? Where does meaning come from in literature? What is literary interpretation and what role does it have in the production of literary meaning? How are literary works related to culture and society and how do they reflect—and reflect on—questions of value and the diversity of human experience? Exploring these questions will help students develop the skills of analysis and interpretation needed to approach literature in a sophisticated manner.  

Section: 024 #5259 
Instructor: I. Cornelius 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 1:152:30 PM  Online/LSC 

An introduction to literary studies. We read poetry, drama, and prose fiction from a wide range of social and historical contexts, and we develop skills, concepts, and strategies for responding to and interpreting these literary works. Themes include the nature of doubt, certainty, and belief; loss, disappointment, and the imagination; the experiences of discovering, wanting, or opposing something; and relations between self and community. Texts may include Homer’s Odyssey, Sophocles’ Oedipus the KingBeowulf, Dante’s Inferno, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Cervantes’s Don Quixote, and Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Assessment is by midterm and final exams, class presentation, class participation, and short writing assignments. 

Section: 025 #5260 
Instructor: M. Forajter 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 1:152:30 PM  LSC 

The foundational course in literary studies will require students to read closely and analyze a representative variety of prose, poetry, and drama, and explore a variety of core critical approaches. Using the theme of outsiders (in all shapes & forms), this course will also explore important conceptual questions about literature and its study. What is literature? Why does it matter? How do we envision the relationships among author, text, reader, culture? What is the difference between reading a literary work in its historical context and in the light of our own time? How are literary works related to culture and society and how do they reflect – and reflect on – questions of value and the diversity of human experience? Exploring these questions will help students develop the skills of analysis and interpretation needed to approach literature as a necessary and accessible art form. 

Section: 026 #5261 
Instructor: J. Chamberlin 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 3:004:15PM  LSC 

Form and Transformation: What Makes Us Human? 

What makes us human? And what makes someone—or something—inhuman? In this course, students will investigate these questions through compelling works of literature. Drawing from a diverse body of writers from across time periods, this class will explore three genres of literature: poetry, drama, and fiction. We will read fantastical transformation stories about werewolves, vampires, and humans mysteriously turning into animals, as well as stories about other types of bodily and emotional transformations we experience throughout our lifetimes.  

This class will also explore the ways in which our understanding of humanity is complicated by race, gender, disability, and animality. We will ask questions such as: What does language and our identities as readers, writers, and speakers have to do with being human? How does transformation complicate what we understand to be the human form? Students will complete three major assessments—a midterm, a final, and an analytical essay—in addition to short assignments such as reading responses and quizzes. 

Section: 027 #5262 
Instructor: TBA 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 3:004:15 PM  Online/LSC 

ENGL 210   Business Writing 

Section: 20W #1699 
Instructor: E. Sharrett 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR3:004:15 PM  WTC 

This Business Writing seminar requires students to study and practice implementing effective communication strategies. The course provides students opportunities to explore alone and in groups various aspects of professional writing, including specific genres (e.g., memos, letters, proposals), stylistic concerns, rhetorical principles, and multimodal engagement. Assigned projects will require students to think critically while researching, drafting, reviewing work submitted by peers, and discussing course content during session meetings.   

ENGL 210-20W is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 60W #2219 
Instructor: M. Meinhardt 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
T5:308:00 PM  WTC 

Business Writing is a seminar designed to build and improve effective communication practices for use in the business community. The ideas of “personal professionalism” and “priority of purposes” guide an exploration of business writing genres ranging from correspondence to memos, and from employment documents to executive summaries. Collaboration, peer interaction, and individual economy direct the creation of a series of writing projects that use revision and research as a necessary step in the writing process. 

ENGL 210-60W is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 61W #2595 
Instructor: J. Chamberlin 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
R5:308:00PM  Online/WTC 

Business Writing will train you to approach any professional writing task by first assessing the rhetorical situation. You will learn to analyze genres and styles of writing commonly used in business (such as job ads, memos, letters, flyers, proposals, and recommendation reports) and compose your own documents based on your assessment of audience and persuasive goals. Collaboration and working effectively in groups are skills essential to mastering professional communication; assignments and class activities therefore will test your ability to respond constructively to your peers’ work and ideas.   

ENGL 210-61W is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 62W #2939 
Instructor: J. Janangelo 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
R 5:30–8:00 PM  WTC 

Our course covers the rhetorical principles of effective writing, focusing on particular types of discourse practiced in business and professional settings. You will gain experience reading and writing texts pertinent to business communication including memos, proposals, letters, and resumes. There will be individual and collaborative projects; you will also give a group presentation.  

Our course is writing intensive. We will use a process approach to writing, emphasizing problem-solving, prewriting strategies, and editing and revision skills. Our class is a workshop. As such, much of our time will be devoted to small group discussions and exercises. You will plan and share some of your writing with your peers and with me in draft conferences. That gives you a chance to exchange ideas, get assistance, participate in peer editing, and receive feedback on your work.  

ENGL 210-62W is a writing intensive class. 

 

ENGL 211   Writing for Pre-Law Students 

Section: 63W #2767 
Instructor: D. Gorski 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
M 5:30–8:00 PM  WTC 

In this course, students will learn to develop the writing skills used by law school students and attorneys to prepare case briefs, office memoranda, and pre-trial motions. Students will also learn how to answer essay examination questions of the type given in law school and on a state bar examination. In class, students will develop the verbal abilities necessary to take a legal position and defend it with statements of fact and conclusions of law. Realistic hypothetical fact patterns will be analyzed using the IRAC method: issue, rule, application, and conclusion. Learning how to cite to legal authorities is a central part of the course. Readings include judicial opinions, state and federal statutes, and law review articles. The course is taught by a practicing attorney, and assumes no prior legal studies by the students.
ENGL 211-63W is a writing intensive class.

 

ENGL 220   Theory/Practice Tutoring 

Section: 1WE #1986 
Instructor: A. Kessel 
3.0 credit hours Seminar 
TR 3:00–4:15 PM  LSC 

English 220 is a seminar designed to prepare students to serve as tutors in the Loyola University Chicago Writing Center. This course is open to students from all majors who have a passion for clear written communication. We will explore the theory and practice of peer tutoring through reading and discussion of research as well as through practical experience. In this course you will learn how to help others become better writers while improving your own writing and critical thinking skills. You will become part of a community of fellow peer tutors and gain experience that will benefit you in a variety of careers. The service-learning component consists of approximately 20-25 hours of observation and tutoring in the Writing Center. The writing intensive component includes several short essays and a group research paper. Students who wish to be enrolled in this course must obtain a short recommendation from a faculty member who can speak to the student’s writing ability and interpersonal skills. Recommendations should be emailed to Amy Kessel (akessel@luc.edu). Those who excel in the course will be eligible to work as paid writing tutors. ENGL 220-1WE is a service learning, writing intensive class. This class satisfies the Engaged Learning requirement in the Service Learning category. 

This class satisfies the Engaged Learning requirement in the Service Learning category. 

ENGL 220-1WE is a service learning writing intensive class. 

 

ENGL 271   Exploring Poetry 

Section: 001 #5892 
Instructor: B. Mornar 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 11:30 AM12:25 PM  LSC 

Poetry is the oldest and most mischievous of literary genres, eternally reinventing itself, challenging conventions, bucking traditions.  In this second-tier literature course, we will explore formally innovative and experimental lyric poetries in English, from the Romantics to the present.  Nineteenth-century American poet Walt Whitman remarked that he considered his Leaves of Grass to be “only a language experiment,” and likewise, we will learn that poetry can help us reimagine what language can do in the world.  With the idea of experiment in mind, we will proceed with the broadest possible conception of what a poem can be—a thing made with words. Such experimental lyric poetry will require open-mindedness, patience, and imagination.  “Meaning” in such poetry may seem elusive, but in the end, meaning is made by us, the readers.  I will provide you with a vocabulary of key poetic terms so that you can describe what you see, hear, and feel happening in these language experiments.  By the end of this course, you will be able to interpret a variety of unlikely poetries and convey these interpretations in writing.  Among the poets we will spend time with are: William Blake, John Clare, Percy Shelley, Emily Dickinson, Sarah Morgan Bryan Piatt, Mina Loy, Marianne Moore, Langston Hughes, Lorine Niedecker, Robert Duncan, Gwendolyn Brooks, Richard Hugo, Lisa Jarnot, Terrance Hayes, MTC Cronin, Erica Hunt, Daniel Borzutzky, and Joss Charles.  The work for this course will include weekly annotations and reading responses, quizzes, a self-constructed exam, a close reading essay, and an exploratory essay project.     

ENGL 271-001 is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 01W #3914 
Instructor: P. Sorenson 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 2:50–3:40 PM  LSC 

This course will act as an introduction to poetry in English, from the Romantic to the contemporary period. We will discuss the conventions and patterns poets often follow, and I will provide you with the standard terminology used to describe these conventions, such as line, stanza, measure, rhythm, lyric, etc. Perhaps more importantly, you will learn how to critically approach these texts. We will discuss how these poems work, what they might be arguing, what they suggest about the historical moment in which they were written, and how they relate to or comment on other texts. We will also examine the critical literature that surrounds these poems. Finally, our course’s theme is “Inside and Out.” These insides and outsides may relate to a poem’s content: dreamscapes, underworlds, and far-out spaces. Our theme will also feature in discussions of the interplay between the content and the form. In other words, we will investigate the relationships between a text’s surface expressions, its outer form,and its subterranean content, its inner meanings. These investigations will help us to better understand how poems contain, mask, or even occasionally abandon “meaning” altogether. Ultimately, we will excavate these poems’ contents; we will pull the inside out. 

ENGL 271-01W is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 02W #3915 
Instructor: V. Bell 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
T 5:308:00 PM  LSC 

Taking inspiration from Donald Revell’s definition of poetry as “the art of attention,” this course is reader-response driven, is about exploring what details in a poem call out for your attention, and then how to write persuasively about your reactions.  To be able to discuss and write about poetry, you will read critical essays and learn basic terms that describe the formal properties of poetry as well as aspects of poetic content.  We will begin with a discussion of the emergence of American poetry, and then explore debates surrounding confessional, post-confessional, free verse, formal verse, documentary/historiographic, persona, and speculative/Sci-Fi poetry. Authors may include William Shakespeare, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Fatimah Asghar, A.E. Stallings, Cornelius Eady, Cathy Park Hong, Sarah Carson, and more.  

The course is discussion-based and everyone is expected to participate by sharing reactions, raising questions, and working in groups.  The course is also writing-intensive; requirements include midterm and final exams (short answer), short papers, peer workshops, multi-modal writing, one researched-argument paper, and attending a live poetry reading (virtual or in-person). 

ENGL 271-02W is a writing intensive class.

Section: 03W #3917 
Instructor: J. Stayer 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 3:004:15 PM  LSC 

This writing-intensive, second-tier course builds on the interpretive moves learned in UCLR 100. Entirely devoted to the glorious genre of poetry, we will look at the tortured, agonized sonnets of John Donne, the sexually explicit poetry of Shakespeare, the fevered odes of Keats and Anna Barbauld, the love sonnets of Elizabeth Browning, the haunting work of T. S. Eliot, the high oratory of Dylan Thomas, the understated snark of Philip Larkin, and the charming felicity of W. H. Auden. 

Instead of granting poems a special status beyond language or normal human communication, we will look at poems as instances of a rhetorical occasion: who is speaking, to whom, and to what purpose? Once we see how poems act like ordinary speech genres (curse, blessing, invitation, warning, cry, lament), we no longer need to fear poetry as an arcane game of hide-and-seek with meaning. How could you not sign up for this course? 

ENGL 271-03W is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 21W #5215 
Instructor: N. Hoks 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 1:002:15 PM  LSC 

Exploring Poetry introduces students to fundamental approaches to analyzing and appreciating poetry. The course’s emphasis will be on lyric poems, especially their development in the 20th and 21st centuries, though we’ll start with some canonical work of the 19th century. Many of the poems will challenge received notions of what a poem is and/or how it might operate, forcing us to develop innovative responses as readers. Following Paul Valéry’s assertion that “a poem is… a kind of machine for producing the poetic state of mind by means of words,” we’ll approach our readings with open-mindedness, ready to plug in to each unique machine to see what happens. 

 

ENGL 272   Exploring Drama 

Section: 04W #3926 
Instructor: A. Welch 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 12:101:00 PM  LSC 

 

ENGL 273   Exploring Fiction 

Section: 001 #6364 
Instructor: L. Le-Khac 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 9:4511:10 AM  Online/LSC   

Asian American Fiction: Routes, Horizons, and Places of Belonging 

Where do Asian Americans belong? This question is urgent in today’s era of resurgent anti-Asian racism, but it has long been a problem for Asian Americans. The disparate routes Asian migrants took to the U.S. tie their stories “here” to a “there” overseas. Meanwhile, their places in the U.S. have been contradictory: embraced as model minorities but also excluded as racial others, foreigners, and threats. Out of this history comes fiction that wrestles with the problem of place and setting. This course will introduce us to the range of Asian American fiction and to the diversity of Asian American identities and histories. We’ll explore how Asian Americans have imagined their routes, horizons, and places of belonging when their places in the nation and the world are unclear. And we’ll stretch our ideas of what Asian American identity can be and where it can travel.  

ENGL 273-001 is a multicultural class. 

Section: 002 #5220 
Instructor: TBA 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 1:30–2:20 PM  LSC 

Section: 06W #4608 
Instructor: J. Fiorelli 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 9:30–10:20 AM  LSC 

Speculative Fiction 

Broadly, this course focuses on the understanding, appreciation, and criticism of prose fiction. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of fiction as a means of exploring human experience and to use the technical vocabulary necessary to effectively analyze works of fiction.  More specifically, this class will take as its subject matter speculative fiction, with an emphasis on American speculative fiction by authors of color.  Speculative fiction may be considered a broad term that encompasses several genres, including science fiction, utopian and dystopian fiction, and apocalyptic fiction.  It stages a break with the author’s time and/or place, establishing a vantage point from which to better understand and critique contemporaneous society.  In doing so, speculative fiction can work in the interests of social justice both by pointing out the limitations of existent society and by pointing toward what could be.  

This class is Writing Intensive; therefore, in conjunction with our study of this literature, we will give significant attention to the writing process.  Course requirements will include active reading, written homework and quizzes, class participation and writing practice, and literary analysis essays.   

Section: 07W #3508 
Instructor: J. Glover 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 11:30 AM–12:45 PM  LSC 

Why do people enjoy reading stories about made-up characters? This course will offer students an introduction to prose fiction as a mode of literary representation. It will aim to acquaint students with the historical development of fictional characters, as well as the many techniques authors use to make fictional worlds, including the creation of perspectives, the description of setting, and the rules of genre. Most of our energy will be devoted to reading and discussing short stories and novels, but we will range across genres from realism to science fiction. 

ENGL 273-07W is a writing intensive class. 

 

ENGL 274    Exploring Shakespeare 

Section: 08W #2478 
Instructor: B. May 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 3:004:15 PM  LSC 

In this class we will be looking at the plays of Shakespeare through a number of different lenses. We will look at the psychology inherent in Shakespeare’s characters, the historical context that led to the plays’ developments, and the philosophy that are fundamental to his plots. By looking at Shakespeare through a multitude of different angles, this class aims to draw connections between our lives and contemporary culture and the plays themselves. 

ENGL 274-08W is a writing intensive class. 

 

ENGL 282C    African-American Literature 

Section: 001 #4609 
Instructor: S. Zabic 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 1:302:20PM  LSC 

This course will glance back at the last century of African American literature, and it will place a selection of authors not only on the map of literary movements, but also in their historical contexts. We will tackle the contentious arenas of both divisions and solidarity among races, genders, economic classes, immigrants and natives, etc. It won’t be a neat chronological trip: African American authors cultivate conversations with the past, clarity about the present, and visions of the future, often all at the same time. We will discuss poetry, fiction, plays, and screenplays by authors such as Lorraine Hansberry, James Baldwin, Barry Jenkins, Harryette Mullen, and Eve L. Ewing.  

ENGL 282C-001 fulfills the multicultural course requirement. 

Section: 09W #4942 
Instructor: D. Davoudi 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 10:5011:40 AM  LSC 

ENGL 282C-09W is a writing intensive and multicultural class. 

 

ENGL 283    Women in Literature 

Section: 001 #3928 
Instructor: S. Bost 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 1:152:30 PM  LSC 

Haunted Houses 

For as long as women have been associated with homes and housework, misogyny, colonialism, racism, ableism, and homophobia have made the home a potentially unsafe or unhappy place.  What do we mean when we say “the home,” and what do the boundaries of “the home” try to exclude?  Where does the idea of “haunted houses” come from?  In our readings and our discussions we will explore the various historical memories that haunt the homes depicted in literature written by women.  What does the literary fascination with haunted houses have to do with gender, sexuality, race, and class?  How do different cultural traditions value homes and haunting?  We will read novels and short stories like Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre, Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s “The Yellow Wallpaper,” Carolyn Keene’s Nancy Drew books, Maxine Hong Kingston’s “Shaman,” Sandra Cisneros’s The House on Mango Street, Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Nancy Mairs’s Remembering the Bone House, Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home, and Carmen María Machado’s “Real Women Have Bodies.”  Assignments will include brief writings that engage the readings in creative ways as well as two exams focused on synthesis and reflection 

Section: 10W #5222 
Instructor: TBA 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 9:3010:20 AM  Online/LSC 

ENGL 283-10W is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 19W #5410 
Instructor: E. Datskou 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 5:306:45 PM  LSC 

Monsters, Madwomen, and Mistresses 

Throughout history, women have commonly been depicted as monsters, madwomen, and mistresses. In this course, we will look at how these three representations of women have been produced in literature, culture, and media from the nineteenth century through today and why these representations remain so prevalent. Within these discussions, we will explore a variety of theoretical and critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of gender, sexuality, and literature. 

Cross-listed with WSGS, English 283 is designed to meet the "literary knowledge and experience" requirements of the Loyola Core. By examining these three depictions of women in literature, students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the representations of gender, women, and sexuality in various periods of literary history and diverse cultural contexts.  

Readings may include Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla, Stephen King’s Carrie, Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, and Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl. Media may include contemporary film, television, music videos, and marketing ads. Course requirements may include formal and informal writing assignments and activities, discussion posts, reading quizzes, in-class discussion, peer review workshops, and a final project.  

ENGL 283-19W is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 20W #5221 
Instructor: C. English 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 3:004:15 PM  Online/WTC 

Building off of the famous trope of the madwomen in the attic, this course will examine the gendering of mental health afflictions that led to the oppression and confinement of women for transgressive behavior through a variety of genres (fiction, poetry, short story) from the late eighteenth-century (1790s) to the present day. We will study texts written by women as well as texts representing women by male authors. Situating these texts within their historical frame, we will consider the medical discourses that labeled women insane and posited that women were afflicted with “wandering wombs” in order to interrogate patriarchal cultures and institutions. Students will examine these representations of women’s mental health issues in a global context in order to better understand how different cultural and political contexts influenced these depictions.  

This writing-intensive course is designed to focus on writing skills that will help students to write about gender construction and difference; to analyze literary texts and formulate arguments about them; and to situate these texts in their historical contexts, with close attention paid to medical and political discourses.  

Possible authors include: Toni Morrison, Mary Wollstonecraft, Arundhati Roy, and Sylvia Plath. 

ENGL 283-20 W  is a writing intensive class.  

 

ENGL 288    Nature in Literature 

Section: 11W #3178 
Instructor: E. Bayley 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 12:10–1:00 PM  LSC 

This is a writing intensive course. In this course we will use a number of different Ecocritical approaches, with a particular focus on Ecofeminism to explore and interpret pieces of fiction. Literature provides a vast account of how the natural world is represented, treated, understood, and further, misused or abused. In response to this, we will explore the question: is there is a direct correlation between the treatment of nature and the treatment of humans, and in particular, women and children? Therefore, this course will focus heavily on the connections between the treatment and abuse of women, children, and nature. Assignments in the semester will include writing papers, reading reflections, peer review, quizzes, and participation. 

ENGL 288-11W is a writing intensive class. 

 

ENGL 290    Human Values in Literature 

Section: 001 #3561 
Instructor: H. Mann 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 11:30 AM–12:45 PM  LSC 

Adopting a global and cross-disciplinary perspective, this section of English 290 will examine the portrayal of human values in modern and contemporary works by selected writers from Africa, the West Indies, South Asia, and North America. Our main aim will be to examine the extent to which the societies under study (and the individuals who constitute them) share universal values and the extent to which these societies and their values are predicated upon culture specific norms and expectations. To this end, we will consider the role of nation(alism), tradition, religion, race, ethnicity, gender/sexuality, and class/caste in the conception and practice of such values. In addition, we will analyze the cultural bases of contributing literary techniques, including structure, language, narrative focus, and characterization among others, to arrive at comparative assessments of the portrayal of human values in modern and contemporary global literatures in English.  

This course satisfies 3 credits of the Core Curriculum Tier-II requirement in Literary Knowledge & Experience. For English majors, the course counts as a 200-level elective for both the major and minor and also meets the 3-credit multicultural requirement. 

Section: 12W #4611 
Instructor: R. Peters 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 1:152:30PM  LSC 

ENGL 290 explores “human values” through the lens of literature. This course will study how a selection of contemporary novels, short stories, and films depict dystopian worlds and apocalyptic events. The dystopian genre has exploded into mass popularity and critical recognition in the past two decades, so much so that it may be the most popular genre of storytelling--from video games to film to prize-winning novels--across our culture today. This course will likely include texts from Octavia Butler, Kazuo Ishiguro, Cormac McCarthy, and others. 

ENGL 290-12W is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 13W #5038 
Instructor:  S. Sleevi 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 3:00–4:15 PM  Online/LSC 

As human beings, who we are and what we value differs radically based on our distinct positionalities. How do factors of time, place, and identity affect our outlooks on the world around us? How do our individual experiences of being human lead us to have differing—and even conflicting—perspectives and judgements regarding the “same” situations and events? In this section of Human Values in Literature, we will explore these questions within a variety of narrative texts that range from the nineteenth century to the present, looking closely at both their thematic content and formal features. In order to achieve the Writing Intensive aspect of the course, we will also dedicate time and attention to the writing process itself and write regularly as a means of thinking through course material. Authors likely to appear on the syllabus are William Faulkner, Jhumpa Lahiri, and George Saunders, and assignments for the course will include reading quizzes, regular short writing assignments (such as discussion forums), three response papers, and a final paper. 

ENGL 290-13W is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 600 #5224 
Instructor: J. Janangelo 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
T 5:30–8:00 PM  WTC 

Our course focuses on ideas and representations of "wealth” as it concerns human happiness, equity, and inclusion. Through our readings, discussions, and analysis, we will pay particular attention to concepts and intersections of gender, race, social class, and sexuality.  

Throughout the semester, we will draw on the scholarship of Audre Lorde, Susan Sontag, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, and Karl Marx, among others. We will study ways that that term “wealth” has evolved across time and maturing media.  

Our course texts include "A Tale of Two Mothers," "The Necklace," and The Postman Always Rings Twice. We will write two essays, a reading journal, a presentation, and two exams.   

 

ENGL 293    Advanced Composition 

Section: 14W #5225 
Instructor: E. Hopwood 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
T 5:30–8:00 PM  LSC 

The focus of this Advanced Composition class will be Writing with/in New Media. We will practice writing in and across modalities and technologies that are both “old” and “new,” familiar and unfamiliar. We will consider how communication is mediated and remediated in the digital age, and we will draw connections between historical moments of print culture with that of contemporary technological advancement, considering, for instance, the many ways that technology has shaped the way we read and interpret (and, indeed, are ourselves read and interpreted). Some topics we will explore include the history of writing and writing technologies, as well as emerging digital genres (websites, podcasts, memes), digital storytelling, multimodal discourse, and visual rhetoric.   

ENGL 293-14W is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 15W #5226 
Instructor: E. Weeks Stogner 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
W 5:30–8:00 PM  LSC 

Making Great Academic Writing Happen 

As many professors will tell you (from personal experience!), great academic writing doesn’t just happen. It must be practiced, studied, learned, and taught. Therefore, this advanced writing course will focus on the academic writing process - how a writer progresses from the blank page to a “finished” product. We will explore how this process works, what scholars have discovered and theorized about it, and how you can master it yourself! Course content will center around, first, students’ reconsiderations of their own writing processes and additions to their repertoire of strategies and, second, active reading and discussion of composition theory about the writing process. Course requirements will include (1) reading and annotating all assigned materials; (2) actively participating in class; (3) completing two extensive essay writing processes and two reflective essays; and (4) giving a multimodal presentation about a theoretical text. 

ENGL 293-15W is a writing intensive class. 

 

ENGL 312    Studies in World Literature 

Section: 001 #5227 
Instructor: TBA 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MWF 2:50–3:40 PM  LSC 

 

ENGL 317    The Writing of Poetry 

Section: 001 #1581 
Instructor: A. Baker 
3.0 credit hours Seminar 
M 5:30–8:00 PM  Online/LSC 

This course offers practice and instruction in the techniques and analysis of poetry through reading, writing, discussing, and revising poems. We will give particular attention to the unique challenges and opportunities facing  beginning poets as we first seek to channel our ideas and life experiences into poetry, to find and then develop our own voices in relation to not only our own impulses but to "the tradition" and the aesthetically diverse and fascinating world of contemporary poetry. The poems you write will be carefully read and critiqued by both your classmates and the instructor. The culmination of the course will be to compile a portfolio of the work you have written over the term. 

Section: 002 #2404 
Instructor: L. Goldstein 
3.0 credit hours Seminar 
W 5:30–8:00 PM  LSC 

This course approaches the writing of poetry as both a study and craft that requires reading, exploration, practice, and sharing. We read a unique work of contemporary poetry each week as a framework for discussion, but the core of the course is student writing. The workshop element of the course is focused on experimentation with language to foster each student’s own creativity and delight in creating work both as a group and on their own. Our work includes in-class collective and collaborative writing experiments, prompts for writing in between sessions, and presentations of student poetry for review by the group. Students produce a final collection of poetry in a self-published chapbook and give a reading of their work for the final. The reading list for this course is focused on POC and queer writers. 

Section: 003 #3929 
Instructor: P. Sorenson 
3.0 credit hours Seminar 
F 5:30–8:00 PM  LSC 

This course aligns poetry writing with the reading of poetry and the exploration of poetic practices both old and new. Through outside reading, students will question their relationships to contemporary modes and cultures. Thus, students will further develop their own voices, styles, and methods of production, and they will begin to situate their craft in the larger poetic world. Weekly class meetings will center on discussions and presentations of outside materials, in-class writing and writing experiments, discussions of student-generated poetry, and collaborative writing.  In addition to regular writing assignments and in-class presentations, students will develop a twenty-page chapbook by semester’s end.  

 

ENGL 318    The Writing of Fiction 

Section: 001 #2113 
Instructor: V. Popa 
3.0 credit hours Seminar 
M 5:30–8:00 PM  LSC 

This course explores the art and techniques of writing fiction; how and why it succeeds in capturing the imagination of readers, and how those skills can be channeled successfully to craft new and original work. This course will include a combination of craft lessons and workshop critique. We will investigate the output of a diverse cast of authors, from Francois Rabelais and Laurence Sterne to Denis Johnson and Danyial Mueenuddin. From these works, we will then distill valuable lessons about the writing of fiction, such as character development, dialogue, plot, and tension, which students will then apply to their own compositions. Assignments include two original works of short fiction (either short stories or novel excerpts) and a final portfolio (which will include revisions of workshopped assignments). 

Section: 002 #3931 
Instructor: M. Meinhardt 
3.0 credit hours Seminar 
5:30–8:00 PM  LSC 

This advanced writing workshop for fiction will explore traditional and contemporary flash fiction, short story, and novel (chapter) forms. Vocabulary, criticism, genre, and rhetoric will fuel a keen attention to the dynamics of both reading and writing fiction for personal and perhaps even artistic purposes. Character engagement, tone, and structural awareness will guide the development of each writer’s ‘voice’ through the development of creative writing designed to both explore and perform on the page. All students will write flash fiction and short story forms, but the novel start (or chapter) is optional. Old and new classics start the class off, but we shift very quickly to student writing and finish with attention to publication awareness and preparation. This workshop develops both new and experienced writers of fiction and satisfies the core expressive arts requirement! 

Section: 003 #4613 
Instructor: H. Axelrod 
3.0 credit hours Seminar 
F 5:30–8:00 PM  Online/LSC 

This is a workshop class in fiction.  Students will learn to become better readers and writers of fiction by learning how to attend to structure, character, imagery, dialogue and other craft elements as we analyze how writers such as Jamaica Kincaid, Denis Johnson, Jhumpa Lahiri, and others create stories that resonate with the stories of our own lives.  What makes a character stay with us?  What makes a metaphor work?  What makes dialogue sound believable?  What is the difference between suspense and surprise? 

Students will write three original short stories, and will learn how to critique each other’s stories in class as part of a supportive workshop environment.  Class participation is emphasized. Fulfills a Core Expressive Arts Requirement. 

Section: 601 #3930 
Instructor: M. Hawkins 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
W 5:30–8:00 PM  LSC 

In this fiction writing workshop students will read, write, revise and critique short fiction with the aim of becoming better writers and readers.  Workshops will be rigorous and respectful, with the understanding that analysis of other writers’ craft teaches us to hone our own.   

Every week we will read and discuss short stories by master writers; most weeks students will read and discuss each others’ stories, too. Every week students will write. In addition to three completed stories assigned as homework, students will do in-class writing exercises designed to create momentum, generate ideas and explore technique. Class discussions will focus on craft as well as concept, with particular attention paid to structure, character development, dialog, voice, tone and imagery.  Again and again, we will ask of each other and ourselves: What works, what doesn’t, why, and how can it be made better?   

 

ENGL 319    Writing Creative Nonfiction 

Section: 001 #2664 
Instructor: N. Kenney Johnstone 
3.0 credit hours Seminar 
W 5:30–8:00 PM LSC 

The Importance of the Personal Essay 

Personal essays allow writers to share unique experiences while communicating universal truths. They also have the power to spark important conversations and foster awareness. In this class, students will study and write four different forms of the personal essay. By reading and analyzing contemporary published models, students will deepen their learning of traditional and innovative creative nonfiction methods. Students will then write creative nonfiction pieces and participate in workshops of their classmates' writing. 

Section: 002 #4614 
Instructor: H. Axelrod 
3.0 credit hours Seminar 
R 5:30–8:00 PM  LSC 

This is a workshop course in creative nonfiction, the fastest growing genre in publishing.  It’s thriving in personal essay columns in magazines and newspapers, in memoirs, and in new hybrid forms. We’ll focus on personal essay and memoir, learning how to write about moments, activities, and relationships in your lives that have given you pause, stayed with you, and left you with questions. Among other craft elements, you’ll learn the distinction between I-narrator and I-character, between exposition and scene, and how to move from the situation—the facts of what happened—to finding insight and meaning through story. 

In class, we’ll read, analyze, and discuss the works of creative nonfiction writers as models for your own writing. This is a workshop, so you’ll hear from each other what’s working on the page in your own writing and what isn’t—which will help develop your ear as you read and your instincts as you write. You’ll also learn to offer thoughtful commentary on the work of your classmates.  The goal is for you to become a better reader and writer of creative nonfiction.    

 

ENGL 325    British Literature: The Renaissance 

Section: 001 #1582 
Instructor: TBA 
3.0 credit hours  Seminar 
MWF 10:5011:40AM  LSC 

 

ENGL 326    Studies in Shakespeare 

Section: 001 #1583 
Instructor: J. Knapp 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 1:152:30 PM  LSC 

Plays of Shakespeare 

This course will focus on a selection of Shakespeare’s plays in all the major genres (comedy, history, tragedy, and romance).  We will read the plays through a variety of critical approaches, taking into account the historical context in which they were produced.  Throughout the course of the semester we will focus on the development of drama in England, the material history of the Elizabethan and Jacobean stage, and the political and cultural place of the theater in Shakespeare’s England.  Plays may include: Much Ado About Nothing, Measure for Measure, Richard II, Henry V, Hamlet, King Lear, and The Tempest and The Winter’s Tale. The primary text will be David Bevington’s edition of the Complete Works of Shakespeare. There will be papers, a midterm and a final. 

ENGL 335    British Literature: The Romantic Period 

Section: 001 #4615 
Instructor: J. Cragwall 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR11:30 AM12:45 PM  LSC 

Romanticism and the Age of Revolutions 

In the last decade of the eighteenth century, the most powerful earthly king was beheaded, the institution of monarchy annihilated, and a God who had been heretofore supposed “Almighty” overthrown.  “The French Revolution is,” conceded even Edmund Burke, its greatest British opponent, “all circumstances taken together … the most astonishing thing that has hitherto happened in the world.”  We’ll study this time of exuberance, dispute, and outburst, in which every inherited piety and orthodoxy seemed debatable. We’ll read poets and novelists, of course—but we’ll also read lunatics and prophets, opium addicts and slave traders, “blue-stocking” feminists and the “mad, bad, and dangerous to know” Lord Byron. In William Wordsworth, we’ll find the first poetry created out of a “language really used by men”; in Mary Wollstonecraft, a fiery annunciation that “it is time to affect a revolution in female manners”; in John Keats, we’ll delight in verse dismissed as “mental masturbation.”  We’ll follow the rise of Napoleon, the fall of the Slave Trade, and the foundation of Australia—in newspapers and magazine articles, political pamphlets and diaries, as well as the parlors of Jane Austen.  Fulfills post-1700, pre-1900 requirement. Papers, exams, the unutterable joy of an in-person classroom. 

 

ENGL 345    British Literature since 1900 

Section: 001 #5228 
Instructor: J. Stayer 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR1:152:30 PM  LSC 

By the end of the nineteenth century, the small islands of Great Britain had extended their rule over a quarter of the globe: self-assured Victorians used to brag that the sun never set on the British Empire. But with the advent of the Great War, British influence began to crumble, and modern uncertainty replaced Victorian earnestness. As a complex of artistic movements (e.g., futurism, vorticism, primitivism, Imagism, neo-classicism, cubism, expressionism, surrealism, Symbolism), “modernism” is the umbrella term given to the anxieties and exuberances that produced the arts of the early twentieth century. This course in British modernism is the study of how these social, political, cultural, religious, gender, and sexual issues played out in literature.  

Using the rough timeframe of the first half of the twentieth century, we will look at many authors whose birthplace or ethnic identities fall outside English borders but whose influence mattered within the British Isles. Critics have noted the irony that British modernism was led mainly by the non-English: Ezra Pound (American); T. S. Eliot (American); James Joyce (Irish), Dylan Thomas (Welsh), W. B. Yeats (Irish), David Jones (Welsh heritage); Hugh MacDiarmid (Scottish); Katherine Mansfield (New Zealander); Joseph Conrad (Polish); Wyndham Lewis (Canadian born). Of course, a number of modernist authors were English: E. M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, D. H. Lawrence, W. H. Auden, Mina Loy, Edith Sitwell. Some of the course material peeks through the end of modernism, to those literatures now commonly grouped as “Anglophone” to distinguish the previously subjugated colonies from their newly independent identities. In addition to Claude McKay (Jamaican), we’ll read Chinua Achebe (Nigerian), Louise Bennett (Jamaican), Kamau Brathwaite (Barbadian), and Derek Walcott (Saint Lucian). 

 

ENGL 354    Contemporary Critical Theory 

Section: 001 #2405 
Instructor: J. Kerkering 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
MW 7:15–8:30 PM  LSC 

In this course students will become familiar with the wide range of theoretical questions that arise when literary critics adjudicate among competing approaches to defining and interpreting literature.  Students will study the philosophical and historical background of prominent theoretical controversies, they will learn to recognize the terms of these debates animating the literary criticism they read, and they will compose literary analyses informed by and attentive to these theoretical questions and concerns.   

 

ENGL 375    American Literature to 1865 

Section: 001 #5229 
Instructor: J. Glover 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
TR 9:4511:00 AM  LSC 

This course is a survey of American literature from the colonial period through the Civil War. It begins with Native American creation stories and stretches to the fiction and poetry of the early national period. We will consider a wide range of American writings, from the journals of Puritan settlers to the autobiographies of the formerly enslaved. Our texts will also represent numerous genres, including diaries, lyric poetry, novels, and political tracts. We will also consider other forms of media including sermons, songs, performances, and popular ballads. As we will see, the American literary tradition does not simply exist in the past but continues to shape the present we share. 

 

ENGL 384B   Studies in African-American Literature 

Section: 001 #5230 
Instructor: F. Staidum 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
R 5:308:00 PM  LSC 

On Repeat: Racial Progress and White Backlash in Postbellum Black Lit., 1865-1917 

In recent years, activists and intellectuals have used terms like “the New Jim Crow” and “Third Reconstruction” to characterize the twenty-fist-century fight against systemic racism.  However, the original “Reconstruction” (1865-1877) was a period of progressive politics immediately following the US Civil War, during which newly freed Blacks, in collaboration with white allies and a protective federal government, attempted to build a more democratic society.  Violent white resistance in the South and shrinking support in the North undermined this project and ushered in “Jim Crow” (1877-1968), the system of laws and customs that maintained segregation and discrimination in all aspects of public and private life.  By attaching “New” and “Third” to these historical terms (as in “the New Jim Crow”), contemporary activists make legible the repetitive persistence of anti-Black racism and the sporadic rhythm of Black freedom—freedom that is repeatedly interrupted, reversed, and delayed. 

In this course, we will examine selected works of African American literature written during the “first” Reconstruction and the rise of the “old” Jim Crow, roughly 1865 to 1917, in order to decipher how African Americans comprehended this disjointed movement from enslaved chattel to free citizen to segregated and discriminated half-subject.  By closely analyzing the formal and aesthetic elements of the literature (e.g., plot, setting, figurative language, etc.) alongside academic theories of race, citizenship, freedom, and time, we will interpret how each text (1) envisions the meaning of post-slavery Black freedom—its possibilities and limitations; (2) diagnoses the causes and conditions of white backlash; and (3) imagines alternative and speculative futures out of this conundrum.  We will, for example, probe the complexities of “performing” citizenship in Pauline Hopkins’s musical comedy Peculiar Sam, or, The Underground Railroad (1879); the inherently antidemocratic constitution of whiteness in Charles W. Chesnutt’s historical novel The Marrow of Tradition (1901); and the vision of Black self-determination beyond the confines of racial capitalism in W. E. B. Du Bois’s Bildungsroman novel The Quest for the Silver Fleece (1911), amongst other works.  In the end, students will develop the critical thinking skills necessary for identifying and interpreting the tension between progress and backlash, then and now. 

 

ENGL 390   Advanced Seminar 

Section: 16W #3072 
Instructor: L. Le-Khac 
3.0 credit hours Seminar 
TR 5:30–6:45 PM 

Imagining Multi-Racial Coalitions 

How can we grasp the charged and shifting landscape of contemporary U.S. race relations? We seem, as a nation, to be hungry for a language, image, metaphor, or story that could make sense of our multi-racial world, grasp the ways minority groups are linked in it, and imagine multi-racial coalitions to transform it. This course asks how the imaginative arts of literature and film might contribute to this effort. After all, bringing racial groups together across entrenched divides requires an act of political imagination. Minority novelists, poets, filmmakers, and playwrights have developed cultural forms, images, and narratives that help us to see and feel related experiences, entangled struggles, and shared fates, the groundwork for multi-racial coalitions. Their visions revise the enduring black/white binary of race in America to register the increasing numbers of Latinxs and Asian Americans and the occluded presence of Indigenous Americans. We’ll set their creations alongside groundbreaking scholarship in history, sociology, political science, and critical race studies in order to understand the racial imaginaries that shape how diverse Americans perceive their interrelations and divisions. Authors/directors may include Gloria Anzaldúa, Cristina García, Gish Jen, Spike Lee, Toni Morrison, Simon Ortiz, Anna Deavere Smith, Elizabeth Wong, and Karen Tei Yamashita.  

ENGL 390-16W is a writing intensive and multicultural class. 

Section: 17W #4618 
Instructor: I. Cornelius 
3.0 credit hours Lecture 
W 5:308:00 PM  LSC 

English Poetry from Manuscript to Print

One consequence of the current digital revolution is an up-swell of curiosity about earlier technologies of communication, entertainment, and learning. What was the printed book like in the early days, when that technology was still new, and how were works of literature published, circulated, and read before print? In this seminar we study poems written on either side of the European print revolution -- works by Geoffrey Chaucer, William Shakespeare, and their contemporaries -- and we inquire how these poems circulated in their own time and afterwards and why medium matters. Students will learn to read one of the styles of handwriting used by medieval scribes and they will learn to read "Middle English," the form of the English language used by Chaucer. Themes include the production of manuscript books, the origins and development of print technology, diversity and standardization in the English language, and the emergence of a self-aware tradition of poetry in English. For students in the Departmental Honors Program, this course will fulfill the pre 1700 requirement.

 

ENGL 393   Teaching English to Adults 

Section: 01E #1585 
Instructor: J. Heckman 
1.0-3.0 credit hours Field Studies 
MTWR 5:30–8:00 PM  LSC 

Engage with Jesuit values and meet our adult neighbors who come from many cultures.  This course offers an excellent opportunity for service learning and practical experience in tutoring adults in written and spoken English with the Loyola Community Literacy Center.  We were located in Loyola Hall, 1110 W. Loyola Avenue, but we have been fully online since Fall 2020. 

While the Literacy Center offers community adults an opportunity to improve their skills, it also gives student-tutors the chance to serve their community and to engage with their Jesuit education.  One student tutor said, “The Literacy Center has taught me the true value of giving, and this is perhaps the most valuable lesson I’ve learned at Loyola.”   

No previous tutoring experience is necessary.  When taken for 3 credit hours, this course satisfies the Core Engaged Learning-Service Learning Internship requirement.  The course is open to second-semester freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Incoming freshmen are always welcome to tutor as volunteers and take the course at a later date. 

Students tutor adult learners, most of whom are immigrants, refugees, or international visitors whose skills in their native language range from their being highly educated professionals to being perhaps illiterate, even in their own language, and who may know some English or no English.  Students also tutor some native English speakers preparing for the GED or improving their literacy skills.   

The Center is open online for tutoring M-Th evenings during the fall and spring semesters from 7-9:30 pm when the university is in session.  1 credit hour students tutor one evening per week; 2 and 3 credit hour students tutor two evenings a week.  In addition, there are 5 class meetings scheduled at 5:45 pm, just before tutoring hours; 3 credit/Core students meet for a 6th session.  

If students have never tutored at the Center, they must attend one evening of an online orientation.  Students keep a weekly journal to reflect on their experiences and respond to assigned readings; examine a textbook and journal articles concerned with literacy, language, and adult education; submit ten of their journals and five short papers throughout the semester; prepare a final paper or project; and, for 3 credit hour students, read and report on one additional text of their choice related to the work of the Center, to adult literacy, to the culture of their learners, or to any topic suggested by their tutoring experience.   

Students who have taken this course have found it to be a challenging and exciting experience, even life changing as they help neighborhood adults improve their skills.  Another student-tutor wrote,  

"Tutoring at the Loyola University Community Literacy Center was easily one of the best experiences I have ever been granted at Loyola University. That is coming from a student who has studied abroad three times, has volunteered elsewhere, and has had a number of internships. Never have I felt so connected t my own values. Tutoring at the center reminded me of my passions and allowed me to help others and make friends in the process… I am truly privileged to have learned about my learners’ cultures and personal experiences. They’ve taught me to not judge cultures from an American standpoint and to instead take every culture at face value." 

More information can be found at www.luc.edu/literacy.  Follow the links to "tutoring" and then "course credit tutoring" for a complete description of English 393/Honors 290.   

 

ENGL 394   Internship 

Section: 01E #1586 
Instructor: J. Cragwall 
3.0 credit hours Field Studies 
TBA  Online/LSC 

English 394 provides practical, on-the-job experience for English majors in adapting their writing and analytical skills to the needs of such fields as publishing, editing, and public relations. Students must have completed six courses in English and must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher before applying for an internship. Qualified second semester juniors and seniors may apply to the program. Interested students must arrange to meet with the Internship Director during the pre-registration period and must bring with them a copy of their Loyola transcripts, a detailed resume (which includes the names and phone numbers of at least two references), and at least three writing samples. Students may be required to conduct part of their job search on-line and to go out on job interviews before the semester begins. Course requirements include: completion of a minimum of 120 hours of work; periodic meetings with the Internship Director; a written evaluation of job performance by the site supervisor; a term paper, including samples of writing produced on the job. 

Please contact Jasper Cragwall, Undergraduate Programs Director for permission (773) 508-2259. 

This class satisfies the Engaged Learning requirement in the Internship category. 

 

ENGL 397   Advanced Writing: Poetry 

Section: 18W #1657 
Instructor: A. Baker 
3.0 credit hours Seminar 
T 5:30–8:00 PM  Online/LSC 

In this advanced poetry workshop, we will seek to deepen our engagement with poetry as an art form—both as readers and writers. Through reading, writing, and workshopping, we will grow more familiar with the anatomy and texture of poetry: image, word, voice, syntactical configurations, rhetorical devices— stanza, line, punctuation, and page. Your work will be given a great deal of individual attention in our workshops, and you will be offered the opportunity to work very closely with the instructor as you write and revise your final project for the course—a portfolio of your best work. 

ENGL 397-18W is a writing intensive class. 

 

ENGL 399   Special Studies in Literature 

Section: 001 #1587 
Instructor: J. Cragwall 
3.0 credit hours Supervision 
TBA 

 

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