Loyola University Chicago

Mathematics and Statistics

FAQ Mirror

The next few questions represent Math 100 content, to be mirrored on other pages.

Chapter 1: Functions and Algebraic Structure
   1.1  What Is A Function?
   1.2  Functions and Expressions
   1.3  Functions and Equations
   1.4  Functions and Change
   1.5  Functions, Modeling, and Proportionality

Chapter 2: Linear Functions
   2.1  Introduction to Linear Functions
   2.2  Linear Expressions
   2.3  Linear Equations
   2.4  Equations for Lines in The Plane
   2.5  Modeling with Linear Functions
   2.6  Systems of Linear Equations

Chapter 3: Quadratic Functions
   3.1  Introduction to Quadratic Functions
   3.2  Quadratic Expressions
   3.3  Converting to Factored and Vertex Form
   3.4  Quadratic Equations
   3.5  Factoring Hidden Quadratics

Chapter 4: Power Functions
   4.1  Power Functions: Positive Exponents
   4.2  Power Functions: Negative Exponents
   4.3  Power Functions and Expressions
   4.4  Power Functions and Equations
   4.5  Modeling with Power Functions

Chapter 5: More on Functions
   5.1  Domain and Range
   5.2  Composing and Decomposing Functions
   5.3  Shifting and Scaling
   5.4  Inverse Functions

McCallum, Connally, Hughes-Hallett et al. Algebra: Form and Function. 2nd edition. (with WileyPlus ebook)

Instructions for students to obtain the e-book and to use WileyPlus: Use your Loyola email address to create a WileyPlus account. Your professor will include details on WileyPlus in the syllabus.

The next few questions represent Math 108 content, to be mirrored on other pages.

Part I - Management Science

Chapter 1: Urban Services [0.5 Weeks] 
Euler Circuits, Finding Euler Circuits, Circuits with Reused Edges

Chapter 2: Business Efficiency [1 Week] 
Hamiltonian Circuits, Fundamental Principle of Counting, Traveling Salesman Problem, Strategies for Solution, Nearest-Neighbor Algorithm, Sorted-Edges Algorithm, Minimum-Cost Spanning Trees, Kruskal's Algorithm

Chapter 3: Planning and Scheduling [1 Week] 
Scheduling Tasks, Assumptions and Goals, List-Processing Algorithm, When is a Schedule Optimal?, Strange Happenings, Critical-Path Schedules, Independent Tasks, Decreasing-Time Lists

Chapter 4: Linear Programming [1 Week] 
Mixture Problems, Mixture Problems Having One Resource, One Product and One Resource: Making Skateboards, Common Features of Mixture Problems, Two Products and One Resource: Skateboards and Dolls, Mixture Charts, Resource Constraints, Graphing the Constraints to Form the Feasible Region, Finding the Optimal Production Policy, General Shape of Feasible Regions, The Role of the Profit Formula: Skateboards and Dolls, Setting Minimum Quantities for Products: Skateboards and Dolls, Drawing a Feasible Region When There are Nonzero Minimum Constraints, Finding Corner Points of a Feasible Region Having Nonzero Minimums, Evaluating the Profit Formula at the Corners of a Feasible Region with Nonzero Minimums, Summary of the Pictorial Method, Mixture Problems Having Two Resources, Two Products and Two Resources: Skateboards and Dolls, The Corner Point Principle, Linear Programming: The Wider Picture, Characteristics of Linear Programming Algorithms, The Simplex Method, An Alternative to the Simplex Method

 

Part III - Voting and Social Choice

Chapter 9: Social Choice: The Impossible Dream [1.5 Weeks] 
Elections with Only Two Alternatives, Elections with Three or More Alternatives: Procedures and Problems, Plurality Voting and the Condorcet Winner Criterion, The Borda Count and Independence of Irrelevant Alternatives, Sequential Pairwise Voting and the Pareto Condition, the Hare System and Monotonicity, Insurmountable Difficulties: From Paradox to Impossibility, The Voting Paradox of Condorcet, Impossibility, A Better Approach? Approval Voting

Chapter 11: Weighted Voting Systems [2 Weeks] 
How Weighted Voting Works, Notation for Weighted Voting, The Banzhaf Power Index, How to Count Combinations, Equivalent Voting Systems, The Shapley-Shubik Power Index, How to Compute the Shapley-Shubik Power Index, Comparing the Banzhaf and Shapley-Shubik Models

 

Part IV - Fairness and Game Theory

Chapter 13: Fair Division [1.5 Weeks] 
The Adjusted Winner Procedure, The Knaster Inheritance Procedure, Divide-and-Choose, Cake-Division Procedures: Proportionality, Cake-Division Procedures: The Problem of Envy

Chapter 14: Apportionment [1.5 Weeks] 
The Apportionment Problem, The Hamilton Method, Paradoxes of the Hamilton Method, Divisor Methods, The Jefferson Method, Critical Divisors, The Webster Method, The Hill-Huntington Method, Which Divisor Method is the Best?

Chapter 15: Game Theory: The Mathematics of Competition [as time permits] 
Two-Person Total-Conflict Games: Pure Strategies, Two-Person Total-Conflict Games: Mixed Strategies, A Flawed Approach, A Better Idea, Partial-Conflict Games, Larger Games, Using Game Theory, Solving Games, Practical Applications

Part V - The Digital Revolution

Chapter 16: Identification Numbers [1 Week] 
Check digits, the Zip Code, Bar Codes, Encoding Personal Data

Chapter 17: Transmitting Information [1.5 Weeks] 
Binary Codes, Encoding with Parity-Check Sums, Data Compression, Cryptography

 

Note: Instructors may vary the topics covered, and length of time devoted to each.

Consortium for Mathematics and Its Applications (COMAP), S. Garfunkel, ed., For All Practical Purposes: Mathematical Literacy in Today's World, 9th edition. W. H. Freeman (2011). ISBN-13: 978-1429-25482-3.

MATH 108 Core Problems

The next few questions represent Math 117 content, to be mirrored on other pages.

Chapter 1: Linear Functions and Change 

   1.1 Functions and Function Notation 
   1.2 Rates of Change 
   1.3 Linear Functions 
   1.4 Formulas for Linear Functions 
   1.5 Modeling with Linear Functions 
   1.6 Fitting linear functions to data 

Chapter 2: Functions 

   2.1 Input and Output 
   2.2 Domain and Range 
   2.3 Piecewise-defined functions 
   2.4 Preview of Transformations: Shifts 
   2.5 Preview of Composite and Inverse Functions 
   2.6 Concavity 

Chapter 3: Quadratic Functions 

   3.1 Introduction to the Family of Quadratic Functions 
   3.2 The vertex of a Parabola 

Chapter 6: Transformations and their graphs 

   6.1 Shifts, reflections, and symmetry 
   6.2 Vertical stretches and compressions 
   6.3 Horizontal stretches and combinations of transformations 

Chapter 11: Polynomial and Rational Functions 

   11.1 Power functions and proportionality 
   11.2 Polynomial functions 
   11.3 The short-run behavior of polynomials 
   11.4 Rational functions 
   11.5 The short-run behavior of rational functions 

Functions Modeling Change: A Preparation for Calculus, 6th Edition, Eric Connally, Deborah Hughes-Hallett, Andrew M. Gleason packaged with WileyPlus.

The next few questions represent Math 118 content, to be mirrored on other pages.

 

Common Syllabus for MATH 118

Textbook:  Functions Modeling Change(5th ed.) by Connally, Hughes-Hallett, Gleason, et al.   

Chapter 4: Exponential functions 

4.1 Introduction to the family of exponential function

4.2 Comparing exponential and linear functions

4.3 Graphs of exponential functions

4.4 Applications to compound interest

4.5 The number e

Chapter 5: Logarithmic functions 

5.1 Logarithms and their properties

5.2 Logarithms and exponential models

5.3 The logarithmic function and its applications

5.4 Logarithmic scales 

Chapter 11: Polynomial and rational functions 

11.6 Comparing power, exponential, and log functions

11.7 Fitting exponentials and polynomials to data 

Chapter 7: Trigonometry and periodic functions 

7.1 Introduction to periodic functions

7.2 The sine and cosine functions

7.3 Radians and arc length

7.4 Graphs of  the sine and cosine

7.5 Sinusoidal functions

7.6 The tangent function

7.7 Trigonometric functions and identities

7.8 Inverse trigonometric functions

Chapter 8: Triangle trigonometry and polar coordinates 

8.1 Trig functions and right triangles

8.2 Non-right triangles 

8.3 Polar coordinates

Chapter 9: Trigonometric identities, models, and complex numbers 

9.1 Trigonometric equations

9.2 Identities, expressions, and equations

9.3 Sum and difference formulas for sine and cosine

9.6 Complex numbers and De Moivre’s theorem 

 

Chapter 10: Compositions, inverses, and combinations of functions 

10.1 Composition of functions

10.2 Invertibility and properties of inverse functions

10.3 Combinations of functions

 

The next few questions represent Math 131 content, to be mirrored on other pages.

Chapter 1: Foundations For Calculus: Functions and Limits
    1.1    Functions and Change
    1.2    Exponential Functions
    1.3    New Functions from Old
    1.4    Logarithmic Functions
    1.5    Trigonometric Functions
    1.6    Powers, Polynomials, and Rational Functions
    1.7    Introduction to Continuity
    1.8    Limits
Chapter 2: Key Concept: The Derivative
    2.1    How Do We Measure Speed?
    2.2    The Derivative at a Point
    2.3    The Derivative Function
    2.4    Interpretations of the Derivative
    2.5    The Second Derivative
Chapter 3: Short-Cuts to Differentiation
    3.1    Powers and Polynomials
    3.2    The Exponential Function
    3.3    The Product and Quotient Rules
    3.4    The Chain Rule
    3.5    The Trigonometric Functions
    3.6    The Chain Rule and Inverse Functions
Chapter 4: Using the Derivative
    4.1    Using First and Second Derivatives
    4.2    Optimization
    4.3    Optimization and Modeling
    4.4    Families of Functions and Modeling
    4.5    Applications to Marginality
    4.7    L’Hopital’s Rule, Growth, and Dominance
Chapter 5: Key Concept: The Definite Integral
    5.1    How Do We Measure Distance Traveled?
    5.2    The Definite Integral
    5.3    The Fundamental Theorem and Interpretations
    5.4    Theorems about Definite Integrals
Chapter 6: Constructing Antiderivatives
    6.1    Antiderivatives Graphically and Numerically
    6.2    Constructing Antiderivatives Analytically
    6.3    [Optional] Differential Equations and Motion

Below are “core problems” that we expect students to be able to solve to ensure understanding of the material in the course syllabus. The problems are taken from Applied & Single Variable Calculus for Loyola University Chicago (packaged with WebAssign), 4th ed., Hughes-Hallett, Deborah, et al.

Chapter 1. A Library of Functions
1.1 1, 8, 13, 16, 23, 27, 31, 33, 53, 55, 70(No WP*)
1.2 2, 5, 6, 8, 10, 16, 17, 31, 38, 39
1.3 9, 13, 14, 28, 32, 43, 45, 50, 51, 52, 56, 61, 68, 19, 71
1.4 2, 4, 6, 7, 12, 16, 19, 24, 26, 30, 36, 45, 47, 48
1.5 6, 10, 12, 18, 20, 30, 31, 33, 62, 63, 68
1.6 3, 6, 8, 9 , 12, 15, 17, 19, 47 (No WP), 50, 52, 54
1.7 2, 3, 12 (No WP), 14 (No WP), 24( No WP), 26(No WP), 28 (No WP), 31 (No WP), 39 (No WP), 43 (No WP), 49 (No WP)
1.8 4, 6, 31, 33, 38, 45, 52 (No WP)
Chapter 2. Key Concept: The Derivative
2.1 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15, 16, 17, 21, 22, 29, 31, 33
2.2 1, 3, 4, 8, 10, 19, 22, 23(No WP), 32, 37, 47, 56, 60, 63
2.3 1, 2, 5, 13, 20, 22, 33, 49, 50, 52
2.4 2, 3, 9, 12(No WP), 17, 19, 24 (No WP), 27, 33, 38, 51, 54 (No WP)
2.5 2, 3, 8, 9, 12, 14, 15, 25, 37, 38, 41
Chapter 3. Short-Cuts to Differentiation
3.1 6, 10, 11, 14, 18, 23, 25, 28, 30, 32, 35, 38, 48, 58, 70, 75, 99
3.2 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 13, 17, 24, 42, 44, 46, 49, 58
3.3 4, 6, 7, 10, 12, 16, 19, 20, 24, 28, 31, 43, 47, 52, 90
3.4 2, 4, 7, 11, 17, 18, 28, 33, 43, 45, 48, 58, 60, 61, 67, 70, 73, 77, 86
3.5 4, 8, 10, 12, 16, 19, 22, 24, 26, 30, 36, 38, 45, 61
3.6 1, 9, 12, 13, 17, 22, 25, 26, 28, 30, 32, 35, 38, 39, 41, 50
Chapter 4. Using the Derivative
4.1 1, 5, 18, 25, 32, 34, 35, 36, 37, 40, 52, 53, 59
4.2 4, 6, 7, 8, 10, 13, 18, 19, 30, 37, 39, 40, 43
4.3 5, 6, 7, 9, 11, 14, 18, 22, 25, 27, 38, 39, 45
4.4 3, 4, 16, 25, 26, 47, 49, 50, 51, 57, 63
4.5 1, 4, 7, 12, 13, 15, 16, 18
4.7 6, 11, 35, 41, 42, 48, 53, 58, 59, 65, 67, 76, 87
Chapter 5. Using the Derivative
5.1 1, 2, 4, 8, 14 ,15, 23, 25, 28

5.2 4, 8, 12, 24, 29, 30, 32, 36

5.3 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 22, 30

5.4 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 11, 14, 16, 19, 25, 26, 28, 30, 33
Chapter 6. Constructing Antiderivatives
6.1 3, 6, 13, 15, 20, 25, 33

6.2 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 15, 18, 20, 21, 26, 28, 30, 31, 35, 41, 44, 50, 55, 56, 57, 58, 60, 65

* No WP means the problem is not in WileyPlus and should be completed from the textbook.

The next few questions represent Math 108 content, to be mirrored on other pages.

Review of Chapters 5 and 6

Chapter 7: Integration
    7.1    Integration by Substitution
    7.2    Integration by Parts
    7.6    Improper Integrals
Chapter 8: Using the Definite Integral
    8.6  Optional: Applications to Economics
    8.7  Distribution Functions
    8.8  Probability, Mean, and Median
Chapter 9: Functions of Several Variables 
    9.1  Understanding Functions of Two Variables
    9.2  Contour Diagrams
    9.3  Partial Derivatives
    9.4  Computing Partial Derivatives Algebraically
    9.5  Critical Points and Optimization
    9.6  Constrained Optimization
Chapter 10: Differential Equations
    10.1    What is a Differential Equation?
    10.2    Slope Fields
    10.3    Euler’s Method
    10.4    Separation of Variables
    10.5    Growth and Decay
    10.6    Applications and Modeling
    10.7    The Logistic Model
    10.8    Systems of Differential Equations
    10.9    Analyzing the Phase Plane

Below are “core problems” that we expect students to be able to solve to ensure understanding of the material in the course syllabus. The problems are taken from Applied & Single Variable Calculus for Loyola University Chicago (packaged with WebAssign), 4th ed., Hughes-Hallett, Deborah, et al.

Chapter 5 Review
5.1 1, 25, 37
5.2 5, 7, 34, 37
5.3 2, 6, 34
5.4 14, 32, 57
Chapter 6 Review
6.1 3, 15, 31, 33, 34
6.2 26, 46, 49, 51, 55, 65, 76, 92, 116
Chapter 7. Integration
7.1 2, 4, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, 16, 17, 19, 20, 26, 29, 31, 32, 33 (No WP*), 37, 44, 61, 64, 70, 79 (No WP) , 118, 132
7.2 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 13, 19, 32, 44, 47, 55, 57, 60, 74, 77, 78
7.6 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15 (No WP) 17, 24 (No WP) , 27, 35, 48 (No WP)
Chapter 8. Using the Definite Integral
8A.6 (Optional) 1, 4, 8, 9, 10, 21, 30, 31, 33, 36
8A.7 1, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, 17, 21
8A.8 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 23
8B.1 1, 8, 13, 15, 20
8B.2 4, 5, 18, 21, 27, 32, 39, 40
8B.3 7, 9, 11, 12, 14, 16, 20, 25, 34, 39
8B.4 1, 5, 7, 10, 15, 25, 31, 33, 34, 44
8B.5 2, 16, 17, 22, 23, 31, 32
8B.6 1, 3, 7, 8, 12, 14, 27
Chapter 11. Differential Equations
11.1 1, 8, 10, 11, 15, 18, 20, 22, 25, 28, 29, 30, 31
11.2 4(a)(c)(e) 6, 8, 12(a)(b), 19, 21, 23, 24
11.3 7, 8, 10, 11, 18
11.4 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 13, 15, 16, 24, 25, 27, 28, 29, 30, 32, 49, 51, 53
11.5 1, 2, 9, 11, 20 WP (30 in text), 24, 26, 34, 39, 43
11.6 1, 2, 6, 8, 14, 15, 18, 22, 24, 28 (No WP), Chapter 11- Rev Ex 45a (Only in WP)
11.7 8 (No WP), 9, 11, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 31, 33, 37
11.8 1, 2, 3, 4, 20, 22, 25, 27, 28, 31, 32
11.9 1, 2, 5, 12 (12a,12b in WP), 16**, 20, 21 (No WP)

* No WP means the problem is not in WileyPlus and should be completed from the textbook.

**For problem 16 in Section 11.9 use software to generate the phase plane. Here is an example website https://www.bluffton.edu/homepages/facstaff/nesterd/java/slopefields.html

 

The next few questions represent Math 161 content, to be mirrored on other pages.

Chapter 1: Functions
1.1 Functions and Their Graphs
1.2 Library of Functions
1.3 Implicit Functions and Conic Sections
1.4 Polar Functions
1.5 Parametric Functions

 

Chapter 2: Limits
2.1 Limits in Calculus
2.2 Limits: Numerical & Graphical Approaches
2.3 Calculating Limits Using Limit Laws
2.4 Limits at Infinity & Horizontal Asymptotes
2.5 Continuity & the Intermediate Value Theorem
2.6 Formal Definition of Limit

 

Chapter 3: The Derivative
3.1 Tangents, Velocities, Other Rates of Change
3.2 Derivatives
3.3 Rules for Differentiation
3.4 Product and Quotient Rules
3.5 Trigonometric Fn’s and Their Derivatives
3.6 Chain Rule
3.7 Tangents to Parametric and Polar Curves
3.8 Implicit Differentiation
3.9 Inverse Functions and Their Derivatives
3.10 Logarithmic Functions & Their Derivatives

 

Chapter 4: Applications of the Derivative
4.1 Maximum and Minimum Values
4.2 The Mean Value Theorem
4.3 Derivatives and Graphs
4.4 Optimization
4.5 Applications to Rates of Change
4.6 Indeterminate Limits and L’Hopital’s Rule
4.7 Polynomial Approximations
4.8 Tangent Line Approximations: Differentials and Newton’s Method

 

Chapter 5: The Integral
5.1 Antiderivatives and Indefinite Integrals
5.2 Area Under a Curve and Total Change
5.3 The Definite Integral
5.4 The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
5.5 Integration by Substitution

Textbook for MATH 162 and MATH 162: Dwyer and Gruenward. Calculus Resequenced for Students in STEM, preliminary edition. Wiley. ISBN: 978-1119321590.

 

Note: MATH 162A uses a different textbook. Namely, James Stewart. Calculus, Early Transcendentals (WebAssign eBook) 8th ed. Cengage Learning. Be sure you are reading the correct information.

MATH 161 Core Problems

The next few questions represent Math 162 content, to be mirrored on other pages.

Review of prerequisite Material from MATH 161

Chapter 6. Techniques of Integration
6.1 Advanced Substitution Techniques
6.2 Integration by Parts
6.3 Trigonometric Substitution
6.4 Integrating Rational Functions
6.5 Improper Integrals
6.6 Approximating Definite Integrals
 
Chapter 7. Applications of Integration
7.1 Average Value and Area Between Curves
7.2 Arc Length
7.3 Volumes
7.4 Solids of Revolution: Volumes by Shells and Surface Area
7.5 Work
 
Chapter 8. Vectors and Matrices
8.1 Vectors
8.2 Dot Product
8.3 Matrices
8.4 Determinants and Inverse Matrices
8.5 Cross Product
8.6 Lines and Planes in Space
 
Chapter 9. Functions of Several Variables 
9.1 Introduction to F’ns of Several Variables
9.2 Limits and Continuity
9.3 Partial Derivatives
9.4 Chain Rule
9.5 Directional Derivatives and Gradients
9.6 Tangent Planes and Linear Approximations
9.7 Extrema and the Second Partials Test
9.8 Lagrange Multipliers
 
Chapter 10. Double Integrals
10.1 Double Integrals Over Rectangles
10.2 Double Integrals Over Regions
10.3 Double Integrals in Polar Coordinates
10.4 Applications of Double Integrals
 
Chapter 11. Differential Equations
11.1 Introduction to Differential Equations
11.2 Separable Differential Equations
11.2 Optional: Graphical, Numerical Solutions to Differential Equations
11.3 Optional: Linear First-Order Differential Equations

MATH 162 Core Problems

WebAssign is an online, interactive environment for teaching and learning.  Using WebAssign students will complete Core Homework Problems common to all sections; individual instructors may also assign additional homework.  WebAssign also provides access to the text as an e-book.  By department policy, homework will count at least 5% towards students' final course grade.  The ground rules provided by your instructor will have further details.

You may begin using WebAssign on the first day of class. In order to access WebAssign after the 14-day grace period, you must purchase an access code as detailed below. If you purchased an access code in MATH 161 or Math 162 for the Stewart text in a previous semester, do not purchase a new code as the code you previously purchased remains valid.

Instructions for students to obtain the e-book and to use WebAssign: Once your instructor has uploaded the class roster to WebAssign, your personal class page will be activated. You will access it with your Loyola ID and password as detailed below. (Note to returning students: there is a change from previous semesters... you no longer need a class key to use WebAssign.)

  1. Go to www.webassign.net/luc/login.html (Note the change in URL from previous semesters.)
  2. Use the LOG IN @ LOYOLA UNIVERSITY CHICAGO button in the center of the page. The LOG IN button in the upper right-hand corner should NOT be used.
  3. Selecting the Loyola login button will bring you to a standard Loyola login page, where you will enter your Loyola ID and password.
  4. Successful login should bring you to a WebAssign home screen from which you can access any of your courses having a WebAssign component.
  5. Select the desired course. If you have not already registered an access code for the course, a notice will be displayed with three choices:
    • Enter an access code (purchased at the Loyola Bookstore or from the Acadiem website),
    • Purchase an access code (online from WebAssign), or
    • Continue the free trial.
    Select the appropriate choice to access the e-book and homework assignments.
  6. If you purchased an access code for the Stewart text in a previous semester, you do not need to purchase another code. 
  7. If at any time you run into technical difficulty using WebAssign, you can contact WebAssign directly by email or phone.  Visit https://webassign.com/support/student-support/ to get started.

Software requirements for WebAssign: You must have the most recent versions of Flash Player (version 10 or later) and Java loaded on your computer for WebAssign to work properly.  The most recent version of Flash can be downloaded from www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer and the most recent version of Java can be downloaded from http://java.com.  The following browsers are supported by WebAssign:

  • For Windows users:
    • Mozilla Firefox (version 38 or later)
    • Internet Explorer/Microsoft Edge (version 11 or later)
    • Google Chrome (version 44 or later)
  • For Mac users:
    • Mozilla Firefox (version 38 or later)
    • Google Chrome (version 44 or later)
    • Apple Safari (version 8 or later)
  • For iPad users (iOS 8 or later):
  • Apple Safari (version 8 or later)

As you work WebAssign problems, WebAssign will warn you if you need additional plug-ins.  If you run into issues with system requirements, go to http://www.webassign.net/manual/instructor_guide/c_a_system_requirements.htm or contact WebAssign technical support at https://webassign.com/support/student-support/.

The next few questions represent Math 263 content, to be mirrored on other pages.

Chapter 12: Infinite Series

    12.1    Sequences
    12.2    Series
    12.3    Integral Test
    12.4    Comparison Tests
    12.5    Alternating Series
    12.6    Ratio and Root Tests    
    12.7    Power Series
    12.8    Power Series Representations of Functions
    12.9    Taylor Series

Chapter 13: Vector-Valued Functions

    13.1    Review of Vectors
    13.2    Vector-Valued Functions
    13.3    Differentiation & Integration of Vector-Valued Functions
    13.4    Arc Length and Curvature   
    13.5    Motion in Space
    13.6    Tangent, Normal, and Binormal Vectors

Chapter 14: Surfaces, Solids, and Multiple Integrals 

    14.1    Cylinders and Quadric Surfaces        
    14.2    Review of Double Integrals
    14.3    Surface Area
    14.4    Integrals Over Solids: Triple Integrals
    14.5    Cylindrical and Spherical Coordinates
    14.6    Triple Integrals in Cylindrical and Spherical Coordinates
    14.7    Change of Variables: The Jacobian

Chapter 15: Vector Analysis

    15.1    Vector Fields
    15.2    Line Integrals
    15.3    Double Integrals in Polar Coordinates
    15.4    Green’s Theorem
    15.5    Parametric Surfaces
    15.6    Surface Integrals
    15.7    Divergence Theorem
    15.8    Stokes’ Theorem

MATH 263 Core Problems

Dwyer and Gruenward. Calculus Resequenced for Students in STEM, preliminary edition. Wiley. ISBN: 978-1119321590.

WebAssign is an online, interactive environment for teaching and learning.  Using WebAssign students will complete Core Homework Problems common to all sections; individual instructors may also assign additional homework.  WebAssign also provides access to the text as an e-book.  By department policy, homework will count at least 5% towards students' final course grade.  The ground rules provided by your instructor will have further details.

You may begin using WebAssign on the first day of class. In order to access WebAssign after the 14-day grace period, you must purchase an access code as detailed below. If you purchased an access code in MATH 161 or MATH 162 or MATH 263 for the Stewart text in a previous semester, do not purchase a new code as the code you previously purchased remains valid.

Instructions for students to obtain the e-book and to use WebAssign: Once your instructor has uploaded the class roster to WebAssign, your personal class page will be activated. You will access it with your Loyola ID and password as detailed below. (Note to returning students: there is a change from previous semesters... you no longer need a class key to use WebAssign.)

  1. Go to www.webassign.net/luc/login.html (Note the change in URL from previous semesters.)
  2. Use the LOG IN @ LOYOLA UNIVERSITY CHICAGO button in the center of the page. The LOG IN button in the upper right-hand corner should NOT be used.
  3. Selecting the Loyola login button will bring you to a standard Loyola login page, where you will enter your Loyola ID and password.
  4. Successful login should bring you to a WebAssign home screen from which you can access any of your courses having a WebAssign component.
  5. Select the desired course. If you have not already registered an access code for the course, a notice will be displayed with three choices:
    • Enter an access code (purchased at the Loyola Bookstore or from the Acadiem website),
    • Purchase an access code (online from WebAssign), or
    • Continue the free trial.
    Select the appropriate choice to access the e-book and homework assignments.
  6. If you purchased an access code for the Stewart text in a previous semester, you do not need to purchase another code. 
  7. If at any time you run into technical difficulty using WebAssign, you can contact WebAssign directly by email or phone.  Visit https://webassign.com/support/student-support/ to get started.

Software requirements for WebAssign: You must have the most recent versions of Flash Player (version 10 or later) and Java loaded on your computer for WebAssign to work properly.  The most recent version of Flash can be downloaded from www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer and the most recent version of Java can be downloaded from http://java.com.  The following browsers are supported by WebAssign:

  • For Windows users:
    • Mozilla Firefox (version 38 or later)
    • Internet Explorer/Microsoft Edge (version 11 or later)
    • Google Chrome (version 44 or later)
  • For Mac users:
    • Mozilla Firefox (version 38 or later)
    • Google Chrome (version 44 or later)
    • Apple Safari (version 8 or later)
  • For iPad users (iOS 8 or later):
  • Apple Safari (version 8 or later)

As you work WebAssign problems, WebAssign will warn you if you need additional plug-ins.  If you run into issues with system requirements, go to http://www.webassign.net/manual/instructor_guide/c_a_system_requirements.htm or contact WebAssign technical support at https://webassign.com/support/student-support/.

The next few questions represent STAT 103 content, to be mirrored on other pages.

Chapter 1: Getting Started
   1.1    What Is Statistics?
   1.2    Random Samples
   1.3    Introduction to Experimental Design
Chapter 2: Organizing Data
   2.1    Frequency, Distributions, Histograms, and Related Topics
   2.2    Bar Graphs, Circle Graphs, and Time-Series Graphs
Chapter 3: Averages and Variation
   3.1    Measures of Central Tendency: Mode, Median, and Mean 
   3.2    Measures of Variation
   3.3    Percentiles and Box-and-Whisker Plots
Chapter 4: Correlation and Regression
   4.1    Scatter Diagrams and Linear Correlation
   4.2    Linear Regression and the Coefficient of Determination
Chapter 5: Elementary Probability Theory
   5.1    What is Probability?
   5.2    Some Probability Rules-Compound Events
Chapter 6: The Binomial Probability Distribution and Related Topics
   6.1    Introduction to Random Variables and Probability Distributions
   6.2    Binomial Probabilities
   6.3    Additional Properties of the Binomial Distribution
Chapter 7: Normal Curves and Sampling Distributions
   7.1    Graphs of Normal Probability Distributions
   7.2    Standard Units and Areas Under the Standard Normal Distribution
   7.3    Areas Under Any Normal Curve
   7.4    Sampling Distributions
   7.5    The Central Limit Theorem
   7.6    Normal Approximation to Binomial Distribution and to p-hat
Chapter 8: Estimation
   8.1    Estimating μ When σ is Known
   8.2    Estimating μ When σ is Unknown
   8.3    Estimating p in the Binomial Distribution
Chapter 9: Hypothesis Testing
   9.1    Introduction to Statistical Tests
   9.2    Testing the Mean μ
   9.3    Testing a Proportion p
Chapter 10: Inferences About Differences
   10.1    Tests Involving Paired Differences (Dependent Samples)
   10.2    Inferences about the Difference of Two Means μ12
   10.3    Inferences about the Difference of Two Proportions p1-p2
Chapter 11: Optional: Additional Topics Using Inference
   11.1    Optional: Chi-Square: Tests of Independence and a Homogeneity
   11.2    Optional: Chi-Square: Goodness-of-Fit

C.H. Brase and C.P. Brase. Understanding Basic Statistics, 7th ed (WebAssign eBook). Cengage.

Instructions for students to obtain the e-book and to use WebAssign:Once your instructor has uploaded the class roster to WebAssign, your personal class page will be activated. You will access it with your Loyola ID and password as detailed below. 

 

1.    Go to www.webassign.net/luc/login.html(Note the change in URL from previous semesters.)

2.    Use the LOG IN @ LOYOLA UNIVERSITY CHICAGObutton in the center of the page. The LOG IN button in the upper right-hand corner should NOTbe used.

3.    Selecting the Loyola login button will bring you to a standard Loyola login page, where you will enter your Loyola ID and password.

4.    Successful login should bring you to a WebAssign home screen from which you can access any of your courses having a WebAssign component.

5.    Select the desired course. If you have not already registered an access code for the course, a notice will be displayed with three choices:

o    Enter an access code (purchased at the Loyola Bookstore or from the Acadiem website),

o    Purchase an access code (online from WebAssign), or

o    Continue the free trial.

Select the appropriate choice to access the e-book and homework assignments.

6.    If you purchased an access code for the Larson text in a previous semester, you do not need to purchase another code.

7.    If at any time you run into technical difficulty using WebAssign, you can contact WebAssign directly by email or phone. Visit https://webassign.com/support/student-support/to get started.

Below are “core problems” that we expect students to be able to solve to ensure understanding of the material in the course syllabus. The WebAssign core homework problems are taken from Understanding Basic Statistics (7th ed.) by C.H. Brase and C.P. Brase (with the exception of three problems that written in italics in the table below). 

Chapter 1. Getting Started
1.1 1, 3, 4, 8
1.2 2, 3, 8, 20
1.3 1, 7, 9, Review.7, Review 11
Chapter 2. Organizing Data
2.1 9, 10, 20, OpenStax2.79, 19
2.2 4, 5, 10, Review.5, Review.6, Q.LineGraph
Chapter 3. Averages and Variation
3.1 2, 16, 17, 18
3.2 1, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, Q.Decision , Review.2, Review.3
3.3 1, 4, 11, Review.8
Chapter 4. Correlation and Regression
4.1 2, 3, 4, 5, 14, 16
4.2 1, 3, 5, 7
Chapter 5. Elementary Probability Theory
5.1 3, 4, 13, 17, 20, 23
5.2 1, 2, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17, 21, 23, 30
Chapter 6. The Binomial Probability Distribution and Related Topics
6.1 1, 3, 10, 14, 16 
6.2 2, 3, 7, 8, 15, 16, 19
6.3 1, 11, 17, 18
Chapter 7. Normal Curve and Sampling Distributions
7.1 2, 3, 4, 8, 9
7.2 9, 33, 34, 35, 37, 39, 42, 43, 47
7.3 6, 8, 12, 14, 15, 17, 19, 23, 25, 29
7.4 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9
7.5 2, 4, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 14, 15, 18
7.6 1, 6, 11
Chapter 8. Estimation
8.1 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 15, 19
8.2 13, 15, 17, 19, 22
8.3 18, 19, 25
Chapter 9. Hypothesis Testing
9.1 1, 3, 4, 16, 20
9.2 15, 16, 18, 23, 26
9.3 1, 10, 11, 17
Chapter 10. Inferences About Differences
10.1 2, 10, 12
10.2 16, 20
10.3 8, 19, 21, 22

Center for Tutoring and Academic Excellence

The Center for Tutoring & Academic Excellence offers free collaborative learning opportunities that include small group tutoring and tutor-led study halls to Loyola students. To learn more or request tutoring services, visit the Center for Tutoring & Academic Excellence online at http://www.luc.edu/tutoring.

Loyola Math Club Tutoring

The Loyola Math Club offers free tutoring to students in 100-level MATH courses (and others). 

Click here to see when it is offered this semester.

Should you choose Math 161/162 or Math 131/132?

Any questions about placement in calculus or other 100-level courses that remain after reading that section should be directed to John Houlihan, Mathematics Placement Director. Please e-mail him to set up an appointment.

Math 161/162 (Calculus I, Calculus II) is a traditional calculus sequence covering all the basic topics of one-variable calculus. This sequence is a prerequisite for Multivariable Calculus (Math 263) as well as for almost all higher-level math courses. It is required for all students majoring in Chemistry, Engineering Science, Mathematics, Physics and Statistics. It is highly recommended, although not required, for students majoring in Biology, Computer Science and Economics.

Math 131/132 (Applied Calculus I, Applied Calculus II) is more of a survey sequence covering many of the basic topics in one-variable calculus as well as some topics in multivariable calculus and differential equations. It is a terminal sequence in that it does not satisfy the prerequisites of upper-level mathematics and statistics courses. Students who enjoyed mathematics in high school and earned ACT math scores of 28 and higher or SAT math scores of 660 and higher are encouraged to choose the Math 161/162 sequence.

Installing Mathematica (free!)

Mathematica is a powerful computing environment that is designed for use in engineering, mathematics, finance, physics, chemistry, biology, and a wide range of other fields. Loyola students and faculty can download and install the latest copy of Mathematica for free. You must be logged on to Loyola VPN, and then visit the following ITS webpage, https://digitalmedia.luc.edu/News/NewsItem/View/4/mathematica-version-9-downloads-available.

 

Wolfram Demonstrations Project

From the Wolfram Demonstrations Project.  ". . . the Wolfram Demonstrations Project is an open-code resource that uses dynamic computation to illuminate concepts in science, technology, mathematics, art, finance, and a remarkable range of other fields.

Its daily growing collection of interactive illustrations is created by Mathematica users from around the world who participate by contributing innovative Demonstrations."

Click on the link to go to the home page of the Wolfram Demonstrations Project.