Loyola University Chicago

Student Accessibility Center

Student Academic Services

Documentation Guidelines

Students should be able to discuss their disability, how their disability impacts academics, and any accommodations that have been successful in the past. Student input is a valuable source of information in determining reasonable accommodations. However, students must also submit documentation of their disability in order to register with SAC. 

Documentation that SAC will accept:

Documentation should: 

  • be completed by an appropriate licensed professional
  • be on letterhead 
  • contain a diagnosis
  • adequately verify the nature and extent of the disability's impact on academic functioning
  • substantiate the need for the student's specific accommodation requests

There are multiple sources and types of documentation that can be useful. Examples of documentation include:

  1. Educational records or letters from educators (IEP/504 Plans, etc.)
  2. Diagnostic reports, including: psychological evaluations, letters from healthcare providers, records of past accommodation from testing agencies
  3. Letters of accommodation from employers
  4. Letters or records from Federal, state, and local agencies (including SSDI determinations, DRS, and Veteran’s Affairs)

Documentation that SAC will not accept:

  • handwritten letters 
  • handwritten patient records or notes from patients charts
  • documentation provided by a family member
  • diagnoses on prescription pads

If you are unsure if your documentation is appropriate or if you have questions about documentation, please contact SAC. 

Please note:

  • Eligibility for services and accommodations is determined on an individual basis. SAC reserves the right to require further documentation based on the student’s need if the information provided is not sufficient.
  • Accommodations are not retroactive and begin only after final approval from SAC
  • Pending the receipt of appropriate documentation, Loyola University Chicago reserves the right to deny services or accommodations. Reasonable accommodations depend upon the nature and degree of severity of the documented disability. While the Americans with Disabilities Act requires that priority consideration be given to the specific methods requested by the student, it does not imply that a particular accommodation must be granted if it is deemed not reasonable and other suitable techniques are available.