Loyola University Chicago

The Graduate School

home_news

International Graduate Student Orientations

2018 International Student Orientations

The Graduate School is sponsoring ongoing orientation sessions to focus attention on the unique challenges faced by new international students and provide them with resources throughout the Fall semester. Each session will provide some time to socialize with other international students. Snacks will be provided. Please RSVP here.

Session 1: Welcome and Introduction, Sept 6, 3pm (Damen MPR South) –  This session will cover visa and legal requirements and an introduction to the Graduate School.

Session 2: Writing and Employment, October 2, 3pm (Cuneo 104) – This session will cover writing strategies and on-campus employment opportunities.

Session 3: Personal and Professional Support, October 23, 4pm (IES 123)– This session will cover resources for your health and wellbeing while in graduate school.

Session 4: Celebrate the Holidays, TBD – This session will provide a social time to celebrate the holidays with other international students.

Fall 2018 Professional and Academic Development Workshops

Fall 2018 Workshops

All workshops and brown bags will be held at Lake Shore Campus unless otherwise noted. You may register for all sessions here.

Can't make it to one of our workshops? Go to our Professional Development Resources for archived materials and videos from workshops.


Thesis/Dissertation Formatting Information Session

Thursday, September 6  |  5-6pm

OR

Wednesday, September 12  |  3-4pm

(Both sessions will be held in Granada 420)

The Graduate School, in partnership with the library, is offering a formatting session which will include general formatting guidelines, online submission procedures, and details about copyright issues for theses and dissertations.  Space is limited so if you are interested in attending this session, please RSVP to formathelp@luc.edu to reserve a spot. Please indicate in the email which session you would like to attend.

Visit the Graduate School’s formatting page for more information about submitting your thesis/dissertation, including formatting guidelines.


Graduate Writing Series pt 1 - Introduction to Graduate Writing

Tuesday, September 25  |  4-5:30pm  (Cuneo Hall rm 217)

The first of three in the Graduate School’s series on graduate writing this year, this first workshop introduces students to three elemental areas of sound scholarly writing: organizing around a complex and worthwhile purpose, framing paragraph structure, and reassessing the source relationships. All of us, regardless of our degrees and status, can benefit from someone who has made it his career to guide people to the next level of their writing ability. This 90-minute interactive writing workshop is specifically geared to graduate students who are struggling with graduate-level papers in their courses and individual research. This workshop is open to Master's and Doctoral students from all disciplines in The Graduate School. Conducted by Michael Meinhardt, English Instructor. Click here to RSVP.


Diversity Issues in the Classroom: Advice for Graduate Student Lecturers, Teaching & Research Assistants

Thursday, September 27  |  5-7pm  (Institute of Environmental Sustainability rm 123/124)

In light of challenging politics and transforming attitudes about what is deemed acceptable to say in the classroom, Loyola graduate students have come together to put on a program designed for handling and negotiating issues of diversity and inclusion. The event is tailored for graduate students, teaching assistants, as well as research assistants. Joseph Butler (Research Assistant for Academic Diversity) and Dr. Christopher Manning (Associate Professor of History and Assistant Provost on Academic Diversity) will facilitate the program. Pizza will be provided at 5pm (first come, first served).

Please register by 48 hours before the session. Click here to RSVP.


Working With the Institutional Review Board (IRB)

Tuesday, October 16  |  4:30-5:30pm  (Granada rm 420)

Graduate students planning to conduct “Human Subject Research” should attend this information filled workshop. You will receive pointers for preparing your proposal and submitting it to the Loyola University IRB.

 

Topics covered include:

  • The types of research required to submit to the IRB consent and training requirements
  • Determining the risk level
  • Determining the type of review required
  • Submission procedures
  • Checking submissions and CITI training status
  • Minimizing risk to subjects
  • Tips and suggestions for preparing proposals: Examples of good and bad ideas

 

Andrew Ellis, Assistant Director for Research Compliance, will conduct the workshop. Space is limited. Graduate students enrolled in Graduate School programs will have priority on a first come, first served basis. Click here to RSVP.


(RESCHEDULED) Graduate Writing Series pt 2 - Organization and Critical Methods for Graduate Writing

Thursday, November 29  |  4-5:30pm  |  Cuneo Hall 217 (NEW DATE AND LOCATION)

The second of three in the Graduate School’s series on graduate writing this year, this second workshop is a true workshop designed around the writing projects that graduate students bring with them. This workshop will emphasize both organizational and critical methods, and the new graduate mindset and methodology with which to apply them. Attention will be very focused and participants will utilize writing practices, instructor feedback and peer workshop skills; this workshop is designed to both pay particular attention to a project of the graduate student's selection, but also how to practice skills for ongoing application following the workshop. Attendees are expected to bring a writing project of value for development, even if it is in an early stage of articulation. Conducted by Michael Meinhardt, English Instructor. Click here to RSVP.

Keep an eye out for the final workshop in our series on graduate writing in the Spring!  This final workshop will focus on Writing as Professional development and will cover writing, editing, and reviewing for journals and general publication.

Spring 2018 Professional Development Workshops and Brown Bags

Spring 2018 Workshops

All workshops and brown bags will be held at Lake Shore Campus unless otherwise noted. You may register for all sessions here.

Can't make it to one of our workshops? Go to our Professional Development Resources here for archived materials and videos from workshops.


Diversity Issues in the Classroom: Advice for Graduate Student Lecturers, Teaching & Research Assistants

Monday, January 22  |  6-7:30pm  (Information Commons 4th Floor)

In light of challenging politics and transforming attitudes about what is deemed acceptable to say in the classroom, Loyola graduate students have come together to put on a program designed for handling and negotiating issues of diversity and inclusion. The event, which takes place early in the Spring semester, is tailored for graduate students, teaching assistants, as well as research assistants. Dr. Christopher manning from the History Department will be one of the facilitators of the program.  Pizza will be provided at 6pm (first come, first served).

Please register by 48 hours before the session. Click here to RSVP.

Co-sponsored by: EDGE (Enhancing Diversity in Graduate Education), Historians for a Just Society, and the Loyola University Chicago Graduate School.


Thesis/Dissertation Formatting Information Session

Tuesday, January 30  |  3-4pm

OR

Wednesday, February 7  |  4-4pm

(Both sessions will be held in Granada 420)

The Graduate School, in partnership with the library, is offering a formatting session which will include general formatting guidelines, online submission procedures, and details about copyright issues for theses and dissertations.  Space is limited so if you are interested in attending this session, please RSVP to formathelp@luc.edu to reserve a spot. Please indicate in the email which session you would like to attend.

Visit the Graduate School’s formatting page for more information about submitting your thesis/dissertation, including formatting guidelines.


Graduation Information Session

Thursday, February 8  |  4-5pm  (Granada 291)

This session will provide important information for all students planning to graduate this spring or summer and will answer the most common questions students have. Please register by 48 hours before the session. Click here to RSVP.


Identifying and Communicating Roles and Skills Outside the Academy (Career Planning Series, pt 1)

Wednesday, February 28  |  4-5pm  (IC 215)

Inside academia one’s discipline is often seen as the work, while the underlying skills and capabilities that make one successful are unspoken.  In this first part of a two part series on career development and planning, staff from the Career Development Center will explore the skills you are most interested in utilizing, connect them to roles or functions of the working world, and discuss strategies and language to best communicate those skills in a resume or CV outside of academia. This session is appropriate for any Masters or PhD student considering a career outside academia. Please register by 48 hours before the session. Click here to RSVP.


Diversity Awareness Workshop and Mixer

Friday, March 2  |  3-4pm  (McCormick Lounge)

This workshop will discuss some of the impacts that the variety of identities we carry with us have on our lives. We will end the workshop with a more relaxed social time for the participants to get to know each other better.  Please register by 48 hours before the session. Click here to RSVP.

Co-sponsored by: EDGE (Enhancing Diversity in Graduate Education) and the Loyola University Chicago Graduate School.


Developing Career Identity and Effective Networking (Career Planning Series, pt 2)

Tuesday, March 20  |  4-5pm  (IC 112)

In a wide range of careers, holding a specific degree does not by itself articulate your interests, goals, and strengths. In this second of a two-part series on career planning and development, staff from the Career Development Center will discuss parameters for constructing and communicating your own personal “career identity” and explore ways to communicate that identity through networking, informational interviews, etc. This session is appropriate for any Masters or PhD student considering a career outside academia. Please register by 48 hours before the session. Click here to RSVP.

The Graduate School announces new Associate Dean

Penckofer Announcement

Sue Penckofer, PhD, Faculty Scholar and Distinguished University Research Professor in the School of Nursing, will become the Associate Dean of the Graduate School, effective July 10, 2017.

Penckofer joined Loyola's School of Nursing (SON) in 1984—where she taught undergraduates and subsequently progressed to teaching graduate students.  She served as the Associate Dean for Research in the SON from 1998 to 2006.  During that time she was also appointed as the Director of the SON Doctoral program from 2003-2006. After 2006, she focused her efforts on teaching and research and was awarded numerous local, regional, and national grants including those from the National Institutes of Health. Prior to joining Loyola, Penckofer served as faculty at Rush University of Chicago’s College of Nursing and at the University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Nursing, and Department of Medical-Surgical Nursing.

 In addition to her teaching and administrative work, she has written and co-authored numerous journal articles, book chapters, abstracts, and other publications on nursing, cardiovascular nursing, and related topics. In 2013, Penckofer was honored with the distinction of Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and in 2015, she was recognized for her research and service for the SON, and was appointed as a Distinguished University Research Professor.   She has also been recognized as Graduate Faculty Member of the Year and for excellence in teaching, mentoring, and advising from the Graduate School. 

2017 Samuel A. Attoh Diversity and Inclusion Awards

Attoh Award

Samuel A. Attoh, Dean of the Graduate School from 2005-2015, believed that increasing the recruitment of underrepresented students and faculty, advocating for and supporting the interests of all students, including but not limited to historically underrepresented students, LGBTQ students, veterans, and students with disabilities, and working with graduate programs to develop and sustain diverse and inclusive academic and social environments created a strong graduate community. In so doing, it was his belief that our students would be equipped to help address social problems and respond creatively and compassionately to the challenges facing our local, state, national, and global communities.

The Graduate School at Loyola University Chicago continues this vision, believing that our students are best served when the university population reflects the larger society.  Accordingly, the Graduate School encourages the programs under its jurisdiction to embrace diversity and strive for inclusion. In harmony with the Jesuit principles of cura personalis (care of the whole person) and homonis pro aliis (people caring for others), inclusion affirms the dignity of all members of the Graduate School community and commits our graduates to put their knowledge, skills, and talents in the service of others.

In honor of Loyola’s Jesuit values and the legacy of the late Dean Attoh, the Graduate School is pleased to announce the recipients of the inaugural Samuel A. Attoh Diversity and Inclusion Awards.

Individual Winner: Cameron Williams

Cameron Williams is currently completing his 5th year in the Sociology doctoral program. Cam researches how public housing residents resist and react to the rapidly spreading practice of depopulating public housing, a topic that he first became passionate about through his volunteer work at his church. Tami Love, an organizer for the Logan Square Housing Organization, notes that Cam first became involved with their project to preserve Lathrop Homes (a public housing community on the North Side) in the summer of 2013. In the years since then, Ms. Love describes Cam as having become “one of the most involved students I have worked with in my almost 25 years of community organizing.” Dr. Kelly Moore, Graduate Director of Sociology, notes that Cam “engenders a sense of family from those with whom he serves” in both his teaching and his community service.

Dr. Moore also says that “Cam draws on a deep well of faith to carry out these many ways of being a person for others. He doesn’t talk much about it, and he doesn’t brag or tell many people about what he is doing for others: he just does it.” It is this quality that truly embodies the legacy of Dean Samuel Attoh in Cam’s work. From volunteering for acts of civil disobedience on behalf of vulnerable populations to mentoring undergraduate students (Cameron was also awarded Graduate Student Teacher of the Year this year) his career at Loyola is filled with extraordinary passion coupled with a vision of justice for others. We can’t wait to see what Cameron does next.

Group Winner: Committee on Diversity Affairs from the Department of Psychology

A diverse academic community is characterized by new perspectives and fresh methodological approaches to scientific, humanistic, and social science fields of study.  It enhances the pursuit of knowledge and its contribution to our understanding of the world around us.  Inclusion values open dialogue, mutual respect, and cultural competence. The Committee on Diversity Affairs (CODA) from the Loyola Department of Psychology exemplifies these values. In their mission statement, the members of CODA proudly state that they aim “To promote and foster an academic community that celebrates and supports diversity in multiple areas of departmental life. To provide support, networking opportunities, and mentoring to students of diverse backgrounds. To increase and support culturally competent research on diversity topics. To promote the inclusion of diversity throughout our curriculum. To give students experiential learning opportunities that address diversity issues.”

While many diversity groups might talk a similar talk, CODA absolutely walks the walk as well. Dr. Robyn Mallett notes that CODA works with students of diverse backgrounds to help them learn “how to persist in research that can be emotionally draining, especially if one has a personal stake in the research question.” Dr. Perla Gámez says that CODA was one of the first organizations she joined when she was hired as a junior faculty member and watched the group transform from one that was primarily composed of faculty members to its current composition, which is about equally composed of faculty and graduate students. This transformation has allowed CODA to make their graduate student mentoring truly relevant. Dr. Gámez notes that “as a Latina and the first in my family to attend college and graduate school, I know firsthand the significant role that a sense of community can have in the college experience of underrepresented students, in particular, contributing to their academic and life success. Given that CODA provides a formal space for faculty and students to put their knowledge and talents in the service of individuals from diverse backgrounds, it also serves to build community for underrepresented students and thus, encourages their academic and social success.”