Loyola University Chicago

Department of History

Graduate Program Handbook

We are updating our handbook.  It will be available in October 2021.

Graduate Handbook

 

NameTitleOfficeEmailPhone
Dr. D. Bradford Hunt Professor and Chair

Crown Center, Room 515 dhunt1@luc.edu 773-508-2221
Dr. Patricia Mooney-Melvin Associate Professor and 
Graduate Program Director
Crown Center, Room 523 pmooney@luc.edu 773-508-2228
Dr. Tanya Stabler Miller Associate Professor and 
Undergraduate Program Director
Crown Center, Room 506 tstabler@luc.edu 773-508-2288
David Hays Administrative Assistant Crown Center, Room 539 dhays1@luc.edu 773-508-2221
Tim Libaris Graduate Program Assistant Crown Center, Room 501 tlibari@luc.edu 773-508-2182

 

 

 

NameTitleArea of AssistanceE-mail
Dr. Emily Barnum Dean and Vice Provost of Graduate Education  

ebarman@luc.edu

Dr. Susan Grossman Associate Dean Academic Policy

sgrossm@luc.edu

Dr. Leanne Cribbs Associate Dean of Graduate Education, Stritch School of Medicine    
Heather Sevener Assistant Dean, Student Services Student Services, Graduation Policies, Probation and Commencement hsevene@luc.edu
Tamika Toler Awards and Budget Coordinator Awards and Reimbursements ttoler@luc.edu
Emily Forestieri Communications and Records Coordinator Graduate School Announcements,
GSPS and LOCUS Questions
eforestieri@luc.edu
Jennifer Chung GPEM (Graduate and Professional Enrollment Management) Enrollment Advisor Prospective Student Inquirires

jchung5@luc.edu

Danielle Richards Graduate Assistant for Formatting  Dissertation and Thesis Formatting and Submission formathelp@luc.edu
    Prospective Students gradinfo@luc.edu
Stephanie Jean-Baptiste Graduate Assistant  

gradresearch@luc.edu

Aleks Galus Sapp Adminstrative Assistant  

agalus1@luc.edu

 

Loyola adheres to all applicable federal and state civil rights laws and regulations prohibiting discrimination in private institutions of higher education. Loyola does not discriminate against any employee, applicant for employment, student, or applicant for admission on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national or ethnic origin, ancestry, disability, marital status, parental status, military/veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by applicable law.*

 

This Nondiscrimination Policy prohibits discrimination in employment and in providing access to educational opportunities. Therefore, any member of the Loyola community who acts to deny, deprive, or limit the educational or employment benefits or opportunities of any student, employee, guest, or visitor on the basis of their actual or perceived membership in the protected classes listed above is in violation of the Nondiscrimination Policy.

 

This Nondiscrimination Policy also includes protections for those opposing discrimination or participating in any University resolution process or within the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or other human rights agencies.

 

If you have questions about this Nondiscrimination Policy, Title IX, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (“Title VI”), Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (“Title VII”), the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (“ADA”), or Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (“Section 504”), or if you believe you have been discriminated against based on your membership in a protected class, please contact Tim Love, Executive Director for Equity & Compliance, or another member of the Office for Equity & Compliance, at (773) 508-7766 or equity@luc.edu, and/or submit a report online at www.luc.edu/equity.

 

 

*It should be noted that while the Faculty Handbook uses a slightly different phrasing to describe the University’s nondiscrimination policy, the substance of these policies is consistent.

The Department of History supports graduate study in Public History and US and European Social and Cultural History with specialties in Urban history, Digital history, Women’s and Gender history, and Transnational history. We offer master's programs in history and public history; a master's program in public history and library information science (jointly with Dominican University); and a doctoral program in history and public history. History master’s and doctoral students work closely with faculty in and out of the classroom as they train to become academic historians, public historians, teachers, archivists, museum professionals, and researchers as well as possess sufficient preparation to pursue other career pathways.

 

BA/MA 5-Year Program

The combined BA and MA degree program in History integrates Loyola University Chicago’s (LUC) current History degree programs at the undergraduate and master levels. The program provides specially selected History majors with the opportunity to more efficiently move through two degrees and thereby jump-start their professional development by completing two degrees in five rather than six years. Graduates of this program are well prepared to pursue a PhD in History, to apply to a professional school, or to seek a teaching position at the post-secondary level. The combined degree will be available for only the MA degree in History (not the program for the MA in Public History).

 

MA in History

Upon completion of the MA in History, graduates will be able to:

  • Use the historical method to solve historical and historiographical problems while applying the perspectives of class, race, gender, etc. to historical events and trends;
  • Identify and criticize interpretive paradigms and methodologies relevant to historical scholarship and the historical profession;
  • Perform historical research in archives and libraries and evaluate the provenance, context, validity, and biases of these sources from the past;
  • Apply the necessary research skills to produce original scholarship on a chosen historical topic using primary sources while evaluating the validity, context, and biases of secondary source literature produced by other scholars;
  • Demonstrate the ability to deploy multiple forms of communication (written, oral, and new media) to discuss their own historical scholarship and graduate-level knowledge of their chosen fields.

 

MA in Public History

Upon completion of the MA in Public History, graduates will be able to:

  • Use public history methods and theories to share historical interpretation with a broad range of public audiences;
  • Apply new media digital tools to the preservation and presentation of archival material;
  • Utilize the best professional practices to preserve, catalog, and present historical artifacts and records;
  • Understand and employ local, state, and federal preservation rules to establish the significance of historic properties;
  • Demonstrate the ability to work with public history institutions to make the past relevant to diverse communities;
  • Perform historical research in archives and libraries and evaluate the provenance, context, validity, and biases of these sources from the past;
  • Apply the necessary research skills to produce original scholarship on a chosen historical topic using primary sources while evaluating the validity, context, and biases of secondary source literature produced by other scholars;
  • Demonstrate the ability to deploy multiple forms of communication (written, oral, and new media) to discuss their own historical scholarship and graduate-level knowledge of their chosen fields.

 

MA in Public History/MLIS Dual Degree Program with Dominican University

Upon completion of the MA in Public History and MLIS in Library and Information Science at Dominican University, graduates will be able to:

  • Use public history methods and theories to share historical interpretation with a broad range of public audiences;
  • Apply new media digital tools to the preservation and presentation of archival material;
  • Utilize the best professional practices to preserve, catalog, and present historical artifacts and records;
  • Understand and employ local, state, and federal preservation rules to establish the significance of historic properties;
  • Demonstrate the ability to work with public history institutions to make the past relevant to diverse communities;
  • Perform historical research in archives and libraries and evaluate the provenance, context, validity, and biases of these sources from the past;
  • Apply the necessary research skills to produce original scholarship on a chosen historical topic using primary sources while evaluating the validity, context, and biases of secondary source literature produced by other scholars;
  • Demonstrate the ability to deploy multiple forms of communication (written, oral, and new media) to discuss their own historical scholarship and graduate-level knowledge of their chosen fields;
  • Demonstrate expertise in archival management;
  • Employ strategies and best practices for preservation planning and management of preservation programs and resources;
  • Assume professional responsibilities in the library and information field.

 

PhD in History

Upon completion of the PhD in History, graduates will be able to:

  • Use the historical method to solve historical and historiographical problems while applying the perspectives of class, race, gender, etc. to historical events and trends;
  • Identify and criticize interpretive paradigms and methodologies relevant to historical scholarship and the historical profession;
  • Perform historical research in archives and libraries and evaluate the provenance, context, validity, and biases of these sources from the past;
  • Apply the necessary research skills to produce original scholarship on a chosen historical topic using primary sources while evaluating the validity, context, and biases of secondary source literature produced by other scholars;
  • Demonstrate the ability to deploy multiple forms of communication (written, oral, and new media) to discuss their own historical scholarship and graduate-level knowledge of their chosen fields;
  • Advance the knowledge of the discipline;
  • Conduct cutting edge research;
  • Engage respectfully in debates about the nature of the past in order to enrich historical understanding and generate new questions and investigatory avenues.

 

Joint PhD Program in American History/Public History

Upon completion of the Joint Program in Public and American History, graduates will be able to:

  • Use the historical method to solve historical and historiographical problems while applying the perspectives of class, race, gender, etc. to historical events and trends;
  • Identify and criticize interpretive paradigms and methodologies relevant to historical scholarship and the historical profession;
  • Perform historical research in archives and libraries and evaluate the provenance, context, validity, and biases of these sources from the past;
  • Apply the necessary research skills to produce original scholarship on a chosen historical topic using primary sources while evaluating the validity, context, and biases of secondary source literature produced by other scholars;
  • Demonstrate the ability to deploy multiple forms of communication (written, oral, and new media) to discuss their own historical scholarship and graduate-level knowledge of their chosen fields;
  • Advance the knowledge of the discipline;
  • Conduct cutting edge research;
  • Engage respectfully in debates about the nature of the past in order to enrich historical understanding and generate new questions and investigatory avenues;
  • Use public history methods and theories to share historical interpretation with a broad range of public audiences;
  • Apply new media digital tools to the preservation and presentation of archival material;
  • Utilize the best professional practices to preserve, catalog, and present historical artifacts and records;
  • Understand and employ local, state, and federal preservation rules to establish the significance of historic properties;
  • Demonstrate the ability to work with public history institutions to make the past relevant to diverse communities.

Each student will receive a Campus Identification Card, commonly referred to as an LUC ID, from the Campus Card Office at the lake Shore Campus.

Please visit their website for updated information regarding the process for obtaining and ID, office hours, hours for ID pick up, office location, and contact information.

Your LUC e-mail account is the primary way the History Department, the Graduate School, and LUC will communicate with you.  Please ensure that you check this account frequently.

If you prefer to primarily use a non-LUC e-mail account please see directions below for ensuring e-mails sent to your LUC account are properly forwarded to another account of your choosing.

Students using Loyola's Outlook Web Access (OWA) site (http://outlook.luc.edu) can activate its forwarding service for sending University email to other accounts.

 

Instructions

1. Sign in to Loyola OWA at http://outlook.luc.edu using your username and password

2. Click the Gear icon sitting in the upper right hand corner.

3. In the Settings Menu, click on 'Mail' found towards the bottom.

4. Click the triangle symbol next to 'Accounts,' then click 'Forwarding.'

5. Click the 'Start forwarding' radio button and then fill in the destination address of your forwarded Loyola email.

6. Sign out of Loyola OWA.

 

Note: The forwarding service will begin within an hour of making the change. The same time frame applies to a request for stopping mail forwarding.

The Graduate School maintains a calendar of key dates and deadlines relevant to enrolled students.  That calendar can be accessed here:

https://www.luc.edu/gradschool/key_dates.shtml.  Please check this calendar regularly for updates.

GSPS is the Graduate Student Progress System. It is a database for everything related to graduate student progress and allows us to monitor students, provide administrative oversight, and document student milestones. While user profiles are initiated using the same login information and ID as other systems on campus, GSPS does not communicate with LOCUS. This means that in order to keep accurate record of our students as they receive merit awards, participate in conferences and publish their work, form committees and complete their programs, we are frequently maintaining information in GSPS that is also entered into LOCUS for student transcripts. This also means that (for now), the degree requirement review process for conferral requires that you and our office review each student’s transcript and enter the information back into GSPS.

 

GSPS can be accessed here: https://gsps.luc.edu/Secure/Login.aspx

 

The Student Accessibility Center's mission is to support, service, and empower Loyola University Chicago students with disabilities. SAC is committed to providing support for students with disabilities through innovative services, programs, and partnerships. SAC leads the campus community in its commitments to recognize disability as a valued aspect of diversity, to embrace access as a matter of social justice, and to design more welcoming and inclusive environments. If individuals encounter academic, physical, technology, or other barriers on campus, SAC staff is available to help implement reasonable accommodations or partner to find good solutions.

 

More information can be found on their website: https://www.luc.edu/sac

 

Grades

Incompletes

The History Department sponsors an annual award for the best research paper by a graduate student. 

 

More information can be found here: https://www.luc.edu/history/mccluggageawardcompetition/.

text

Requirement form – MA Students

 

Requirement Form – Public History MA Students

 

Requirement Form – Public History MA/MLIS Students

 

Requirement Form – PhD History

 

Requirement Form – PhD Join American/Public History

Introduction

Major and Minor field Examinations in U.S. History

Major and Minor Field Examinations in non-U.S. History Fields

Examination Format

          MA Major Field

          PhD Minor Field

          PhD Comprehensive Major Field

          Public History Oral Examination (MA and PhD)

Field Examination committee and Reading Lists

           Setting up the Examination Committee

            Creating the Examination Reading List

                       Suggested Reading Lists

            Meeting with Committee Members

Scheduling and Taking the Examination

Grading the Examination