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ACCT 201: Introductory Accounting I Session: A Instructor: Kolos ONLINE
The major emphasis is on the development and reporting of accounting information for use by investors, creditors, and others. The student is required to develop skills in the preparation and use of accounting information and must demonstrate an understanding of the accounting process, and be able to evaluate the impact of estimates, alternative accounting principles, and the limitations of the accounting model on accounting information. Topics include preparation and use of financial statements; the accounting process; and the measurement and reporting of income, assets, liabilities, and owners’ equity. The student will be able to understand the underlying principles, design, concepts, limitations, and the necessity of accounting systems. The student will gain an appreciation of the uses of financial data and financial statements and their impact on business decisions.
Introductory Accounting I, ACCT 201, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Accounting and Business Law, Kolos, Summer Session A, ONLINE
ACCT 201: Introductory Accounting I Session: B Instructor: Gillespie ONLINE
The major emphasis is on the development and reporting of accounting information for use by investors, creditors, and others. The student is required to develop skills in the preparation and use of accounting information and must demonstrate an understanding of the accounting process, and be able to evaluate the impact of estimates, alternative accounting principles, and the limitations of the accounting model on accounting information. Topics include preparation and use of financial statements; the accounting process; and the measurement and reporting of income, assets, liabilities, and owners’ equity. The student will be able to understand the underlying principles, design, concepts, limitations, and the necessity of accounting systems. The student will gain an appreciation of the uses of financial data and financial statements and their impact on business decisions.
Introductory Accounting I, ACCT 201, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Accounting, Gillespie, Summer Session B, ONLINE
ACCT 202: Introductory Accounting II Session: A Instructor: Lee ONLINE
This course highlights the differences between financial accounting and managerial accounting. The course begins by completing the study of transactions and events affecting financial statements. The cash flow statement is then explored in some detail. Finally, financial statement analysis as traditionally practiced, is considered a capstone for financial accounting. The course then focuses on the use of accounting data by management. Product costing in a manufacturing setting, assigning of costs to objects, learning how costs behave, and the use of accounting data by management in planning operations, controlling operations, and in short term decision making are all investigated. Students will be able to understand the differences between cash and accrual accounting, the use of ratio analysis in investing and managing decisions, the value and importance of identifying and allocating costs, and the methods involved in the budgeting process.
Introductory Accounting II, ACCT 202, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Accounting and Business Law, Lee, Summer Session A, ONLINE
ACCT 202 : Introductory Accounting II Session: B Instructor: Dingrando ONLINE
This course highlights the differences between financial accounting and managerial accounting. The course begins by completing the study of transactions and events affecting financial statements. The cash flow statement is then explored in some detail. Finally, financial statement analysis as traditionally practiced, is considered a capstone for financial accounting. The course then focuses on the use of accounting data by management. Product costing in a manufacturing setting, assigning of costs to objects, learning how costs behave, and the use of accounting data by management in planning operations, controlling operations, and in short term decision making are all investigated. Students will be able to understand the differences between cash and accrual accounting, the use of ratio analysis in investing and managing decisions, the value and importance of identifying and allocating costs, and the methods involved in the budgeting process.
Introductory Accounting II, ACCT 202 , Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Dingrando, Summer Session B, ONLINE
ACCT 307: Advanced Accounting: Not-For-Profit Entities & Advanced Financial Accounting Topics Session: B Instructor: Jordan ONLINE
Topics include accounting concepts as applied to state and local government, along with financial reporting for other not-for-profit entities including hospitals, universities, and voluntary health and welfare organizations. Class may be taken prior to ACC 306.Students will gain a comprehensive knowledge of the reporting requirements of not-for-profit entities.
Advanced Accounting: Not-For-Profit Entities & Advanced Financial Accounting Topics, ACCT 307, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Business, Accounting, Jordan, Summer Session B, ONLINE
ANTH 100: Globalization & Local Cultures Session: A Instructor: Gomberg-Munoz ONLINE
This course is a study of cultural diversity on a global scale, and provides a comparative perspective on the investigation of humans as cultural and social beings. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the historic and contemporary relationships between cultures and societies, and to understand how cultures change over time.
Globalization & Local Cultures, ANTH 100, TBA, cas, Anthropology, Gomberg-Munoz, Summer Session A, ONLINE
ANTH 100: Globalization & Local Cultures Session: B Instructor: Butler ONLINE
This course is a study of cultural diversity on a global scale, and provides a comparative perspective on the investigation of humans as cultural and social beings. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the historic and contemporary relationships between cultures and societies, and to understand how cultures change over time.
Globalization & Local Cultures, ANTH 100, TBA, cas, Anthropology, Butler, Summer Session B, ONLINE
ANTH 100: Globalization & Local Cultures Session: A Instructor: Nichols ONLINE
This course is a study of cultural diversity on a global scale, and provides a comparative perspective on the investigation of humans as cultural and social beings. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the historic and contemporary relationships between cultures and societies, and to understand how cultures change over time.
Globalization & Local Cultures, ANTH 100, TBA, cas, Anthropology, Nichols, Summer Session A, ONLINE
ANTH 101: Human Origins Session: A Instructor: Tomczak ONLINE
This course explores the study of the biological history of the human species from its inception to the establishments of food producing societies. Students will demonstrate understanding of basic biological principles (heredity, physiology, evolutionary mechanisms, ecology) in the context of their application to the human condition, as well as the role of cultural behavior in defining the distinctiveness of that condition.
Human Origins, ANTH 101, TBA, cas, Anthropology, Tomczak, Summer Session A, ONLINE
ANTH 396: Internship in Anthropology Session: A, B Instructor: TBA ONLINE
This course is designed to enhance student engagement by facilitating internship experiences within the department or in museums, service-oriented organizations, businesses, and non-profit organizations. Experiential learning is combined with rigorous academic work. This course may serve, if appropriate, as a capstone experience. Students will produce a research paper, project, proposal, or assessed piece that reflects the application and integration of anthropological theory, methods, or techniques, to the internship experience.
Internship in Anthropology, ANTH 396, TBA, cas, Anthropology, TBA, Summer Session A, B, ONLINE
ANTH 397: Directed Readings in Anthropology Session: A, B Instructor: TBA ONLINE
Individualized readings in varied topics within anthropology. Students will gain detailed knowledge of the specific topic of their directed readings subject.
Directed Readings in Anthropology, ANTH 397, TBA, cas, Anthropology, TBA, Summer Session A, B, ONLINE
ANTH 398: Independent Study in Anthropology Session: A, B Instructor: TBA ONLINE
Individualized program of independent study of anthropological problems and/or issues. Students will gain detailed knowledge of the specific study program they undertake.
Independent Study in Anthropology, ANTH 398, TBA, cas, Anthropology, TBA, Summer Session A, B, ONLINE
ANTH 399: Fieldwork in Anthropology Session: A, B Instructor: TBA
Application of anthropological concepts and methods to a specific field situation under the supervision of a faculty member. Students will learn field techniques and data recovery and analysis techniques pertinent to the specific nature of their field experience.
Fieldwork in Anthropology, ANTH 399, TBA, cas, Anthropology, TBA, Summer Session A, B
BIOL 101: General Biology I Session: A Instructor: Diggs ONLINE
Fundamental principles of biology including basic chemistry, cell structure and function, energy transformations, evolutionary theory, cellular reproduction and principles of genetics.
General Biology I, BIOL 101, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Diggs, Summer Session A, ONLINE
BIOL 102: General Biology II Session: B Instructor: Grace ONLINE
Fundamental principles of biology including diversity of life, environmental and biological diversity, population and community ecology, study of plant structure and function, reproduction and controlling plant growth and development, comparative animal organ systems and mechanism of cell communication.
General Biology II, BIOL 102, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Grace, Summer Session B, ONLINE
BIOL 111: General Biology I Lab Session: A Instructor: Franks LSC
Complements the lecture material through observation, experimentation, and when appropriate, dissection of representative organisms. Observations will include physical and chemical phenomena as well as the anatomy and physiology of selected organisms. The organisms to be studied will be selected from the kingdoms monera, protista, fungi, plantae and animalia.
General Biology I Lab, BIOL 111, Tue, Thurs, cas, Biology, Franks, Summer Session A, LSC
BIOL 112: General Biology Lab II Session: B Instructor: Franks LSC
Complements the lecture material through observation, experimentation, and when appropriate, dissection of representative organisms. Observations will include physical and chemical phenomena as well as the anatomy and physiology of selected organisms. The organisms to be studied will be selected from the kingdoms monera, protista, fungi, plantae and animalia.
General Biology Lab II, BIOL 112, Tue, Thurs, cas, Biology, Franks, Summer Session B, LSC
BIOL 242 (lab required): Human Structure & Function I Session: A Instructor: Hayes LSC
This class includes lecture, laboratory, and demonstrations and focuses on organization of the human body from the cellular to the organismal level. Anatomy of body systems and their physiology related to support and movement (integumentary, skeletal and muscular systems), and integration and control (nervous and endocrine systems). Dissection of representative organs is required. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of human anatomy at the microscopic and gross levels. They will be able to correlate structure and function and will have a firm understanding of the organizing principle of human physiology, homeostasis, and explain the role of the nervous and endocrine systems in its maintenance.
Human Structure & Function I, BIOL 242 (lab required), Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Hayes, Summer Session A, LSC
BIOL 242 Lab: Human Structure & Function I Lab Session: A Instructor: Hu LSC
This class includes lecture, laboratory, and demonstrations and focuses on organization of the human body from the cellular to the organismal level. Anatomy of body systems and their physiology related to support and movement (integumentary, skeletal and muscular systems), and integration and control (nervous and endocrine systems). Dissection of representative organs is required. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of human anatomy at the microscopic and gross levels. They will be able to correlate structure and function and will have a firm understanding of the organizing principle of human physiology, homeostasis, and explain the role of the nervous and endocrine systems in its maintenance.
Human Structure & Function I Lab, BIOL 242 Lab, Tue, Thurs, cas, Biology, Hu, Summer Session A, LSC
BIOL 243: Human Structure & Function II Session: B Instructor: Staley LSC
This class includes lecture, laboratory ,and demonstrations. A continuation of BIOL 242. Anatomy of body systems and their physiology related to regulation and maintenance (cardiovascular, lymphatic respiratory, digestive and urinary systems), and reproduction and development (male and female reproductive systems.) Dissection of representative organs is required. Students will be able to demonstrate a comprehensive integrated knowledge and understanding of human anatomy and physiology at all levels.
Human Structure & Function II, BIOL 243, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Staley, Summer Session B, LSC
BIOL 243 Lab: Human Structure & Function II Lab Session: B Instructor: Hu LSC
This class includes lecture, laboratory ,and demonstrations. A continuation of BIOL 242. Anatomy of body systems and their physiology related to regulation and maintenance (cardiovascular, lymphatic respiratory, digestive and urinary systems), and reproduction and development (male and female reproductive systems.) Dissection of representative organs is required. Students will be able to demonstrate a comprehensive integrated knowledge and understanding of human anatomy and physiology at all levels.
Human Structure & Function II Lab, BIOL 243 Lab, Tue, Thurs, cas, Biology, Hu, Summer Session B, LSC
BIOL251: Cell Biology Session: A Instructor: Kanzok LSC
Basic molecular and cellular studies of living organisms, emphasizing the relationships between subcellular structures and biochemical and physiological functions of cells.
Cell Biology, BIOL251, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Biology, Kanzok, Summer Session A, LSC
BIOL 251: Cell Biology Session: B Instructor: Dale ONLINE
Basic molecular and cellular studies of living organisms, emphasizing the relationships between subcellular structures and biochemical and physiological functions of cells.
Cell Biology, BIOL 251, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Biology, Dale, Summer Session B, ONLINE
BIOL 265: Ecology Session: A Instructor: Sines ONLINE
Relationships of organisms to their environment and to each other at the organismal, population and community levels.
Ecology, BIOL 265, TBA, cas, Biology, Sines, Summer Session A, ONLINE
BIOL 265: Ecology Session: B Instructor: Krentzel LSC
Relationships of organisms to their environment and to each other at the organismal, population and community levels.
Ecology, BIOL 265, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Biology, Krentzel, Summer Session B, LSC
BIOL 282: Genetics Session: A Instructor: Buldak LSC
This course surveys principles and processes of genetic inheritance, gene expression, molecular biology, developmental, quantitative, population, and evolutionary genetics. Students will develop knowledge and awareness of the genetic bases of modern biology. They will understand Mendelian principles of inheritance, chromosome and DNA structure and replication, gene expression, molecular biology, genetic bases of development, and other biological processes, and quantitative, population and evolutionary genetics.
Genetics, BIOL 282, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Buldak, Summer Session A, LSC
BIOL 282: Genetics Session: B Instructor: Osenkowski ONLINE
This course surveys principles and processes of genetic inheritance, gene expression, molecular biology, developmental, quantitative, population, and evolutionary genetics. Students will develop knowledge and awareness of the genetic bases of modern biology. They will understand Mendelian principles of inheritance, chromosome and DNA structure and replication, gene expression, molecular biology, genetic bases of development, and other biological processes, and quantitative, population and evolutionary genetics.
Genetics, BIOL 282, TBA, cas, Biology, Osenkowski, Summer Session B, ONLINE
BIOL 283: Genetics Laboratory Session: A Instructor: Buldak LSC
Experiments and demonstrations to illustrate chromosomal structures and transmission, molecular biology, gene linkage, gene frequencies and variation. Students will develop technical skills and ability to interpret data from a variety of types of genetics experiments.
Genetics Laboratory, BIOL 283, Tue, Thurs, cas, Biology, Buldak, Summer Session A, LSC
BIOL 302: General Microbiology Lab Session: A Instructor: Ritzert LSC
In a lecture/laboratory combination, this course covers the fundamental concepts of microbial life, physiology, and metabolism. Students will learn the differences between the three domains of life and will comprehend the biochemistry, morphology, growth characteristics, structure, and ecology of microbes.
General Microbiology Lab, BIOL 302, Tue, Thurs, cas, Biology, Ritzert, Summer Session A, LSC
BIOL 302: General Microbiology Lecture Session: A Instructor: Ritzert LSC
In a lecture/laboratory combination, this course covers the fundamental concepts of microbial life, physiology, and metabolism. Students will learn the differences between the three domains of life and will comprehend the biochemistry, morphology, growth characteristics, structure, and ecology of microbes.
General Microbiology Lecture, BIOL 302, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Ritzert, Summer Session A, LSC
BIOL 304: Intro to Developmental Biology Session: A Instructor: Dale ONLINE
The analysis of developmental processes such as; fertilization, embryonic cleavage, cell determination and cell differentiation in selected species. Emphasis will be on experiments that reveal how these processes are controlled at the molecular and cellular levels. Outcome: Students will become familiar with a wide range of developmental biology principles and experimental approaches that led to important discoveries, gain an appreciation of the scientific method, and learn about the goals of modern developmental biology research.
Intro to Developmental Biology, BIOL 304, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Biology, Dale, Summer Session A, ONLINE
BIOL 362 : Neurobiology Session: B Instructor: Hayes LSC
The purpose of this course is to introduce major principles and concepts of modern neurobiology. An emphasis is placed upon an understanding of the electrophysiology of the neuron and the manner in which groups of neurons are organized into functional nervous systems subserving sensory, motor or integrative functions. Student will gain a solid foundation in nervous system structure and function.
Neurobiology, BIOL 362 , Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Neurobiology , Hayes, Summer Session B, LSC
BIOL 366: Cell Physiol & Biochem Session: A Instructor: May LSC
An introduction to biochemical principles as they relate to major biological themes such as the relationship between cellular structure and function, metabolism, thermodynamics, regulation, information pathways, and evolution. BIOL 366 is cross-listed with CHEM 361.
Cell Physiol & Biochem , BIOL 366, Mon, Wed, Fri, Biology, May, Summer Session A, LSC
BIOL 373: Laboratory in Neuroscience I Session: Early Instructor: Ye LSC
Students will be trained in various anatomical, physiological, behavioral, and neurobiological modeling techniques used to study the nervous system and the brain in the laboratory. This course is cross-listed as NEUR 301 & PSYC 388.
Laboratory in Neuroscience I, BIOL 373, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Ye, Summer Session Early, LSC
BIOL 395: Special Topics in Biology (Global Biological Risks) Session: Early Instructor: Burns ONLINE
In this course, we will focus on the present and emerging threats to global civilization- specifically those that relate to biological science. These include bioterrorism, naturally emerging viral and microbial pathogens, antimicrobial-resistant organism, genetically modified organisms (including humans), and human-driven impacts on the ecosystem. Each of these topics will be covered in detail along with the specific challenges they pose and the current solutions to each that are being developed.
Special Topics in Biology (Global Biological Risks), BIOL 395, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Burns, Summer Session Early, ONLINE
BIOL 395L: Special Topics Laboratory (Advanced Genetics Lab) Session: A Instructor: Beatty LSC
In this research-based course, students will contribute to a multi-institutional initiative characterizing Drosophila mutants with defects in DNA repair using a variety of lab techniques. Students will write a short paper detailing their findings and present these findings to the class and our collaborators.
Special Topics Laboratory (Advanced Genetics Lab), BIOL 395L, Mon, Wed, cas, Biology, Beatty, Summer Session A, LSC
BIOL 395L: Special Topics Laboratory (Evolution Lab) Session: B Instructor: Stuart LSC
Students will be collaborating with researchers at the Field Museum of Natural History in original research to describe new species and to investigate the origin of allometric differences among sexes and species. This is open-ended research with potential for novel discovery.
Special Topics Laboratory (Evolution Lab), BIOL 395L, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Stuart, Summer Session B, LSC
BSAD 220: Career Preparation Session: Early Instructor: Gramata ONLINE
Internship and Career Preparation introduce students to the critical skills required for successful career development and job search navigation. Students will learn about career development; develop job/internship search skills; establish a job/internship search action plan and begin to become oriented to employer research. Topics addressed will include resume/job search correspondence; interviewing skills; network building; career & employer research and career development resource building.
Career Preparation, BSAD 220, Mon, Tue, Wed, quinlan, Business Administration, Gramata, Summer Session Early, ONLINE
BSAD 300: Business Internship Session: A, B Instructor: Rubango ONLINE
Business Internship for elective credit is for SBA students, and non-SBA students pursing a minor in the School of Business, who wish to earn academic, elective credit while pursuing an internship opportunity. The course is variable credit from 1-3 hours and may be repeated for credit for a total of 3 earned hours. BSAD 300 is not a course for credit in any SBA major or minor
Business Internship, BSAD 300, TBA, quinlan, Business Administration, Rubango, Summer Session A, B, ONLINE
BSAD 343: Business Analytics Session: A Instructor: Guder ONLINE
Business Internship connects academic learning with the internship experience. Students will be challenged to analyze the theory and practices from the world of work that impact the ethics of leading, interpersonal and organizational dynamics, and competent work place contributions required for success in the modern business world. Concepts associated with internship/experiential learning as related to career development will be addressed. Students must be working in an internship during the term of enrollment into BSAD 351.
Business Analytics, BSAD 343, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Business Administration, Guder, Summer Session A, ONLINE
BSAD 343: Business Analytics Session: B Instructor: Hoffmann ONLINE
Business Internship connects academic learning with the internship experience. Students will be challenged to analyze the theory and practices from the world of work that impact the ethics of leading, interpersonal and organizational dynamics, and competent work place contributions required for success in the modern business world. Concepts associated with internship/experiential learning as related to career development will be addressed. Students must be working in an internship during the term of enrollment into BSAD 351.
Business Analytics, BSAD 343, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Business Administration, Hoffmann, Summer Session B, ONLINE
BSAD 351: Business Internship - Engaged Learning Session: A, B Instructor: Lithgow ONLINE
Business Internship connects academic learning with the internship experience. Students will be challenged to analyze the theory and practices from the world of work that impact the ethics of leading, interpersonal and organizational dynamics, and competent work place contributions required for success in the modern business world. Concepts associated with internship/experiential learning as related to career development will be addressed. Students must be working in an internship during the term of enrollment into BSAD 351.
Business Internship - Engaged Learning, BSAD 351, TBA, quinlan, Business Administration, Lithgow, Summer Session A, B, ONLINE
CHEM 101: General Chemistry A Session: A Instructor: Daubenmire ONLINE
This lecture and discussion deals with the development of basic chemical principles. Topics include atomic and molecular structures, states of matter, energetics and stoichiometry of reactions. (For non-chemistry majors and students in the B.A. chemistry program.)
General Chemistry A, CHEM 101, Mon, Wed, cas, Chemistry, Daubenmire, Summer Session A, ONLINE
CHEM 101: General Chemistry A Session: A Instructor: Greene-Johnson LSC
This lecture and discussion deals with the development of basic chemical principles. Topics include atomic and molecular structures, states of matter, energetics and stoichiometry of reactions. (For non-chemistry majors and students in the B.A. chemistry program.)
General Chemistry A, CHEM 101, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Greene-Johnson, Summer Session A, LSC
CHEM 102: General Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: Daubenmire ONLINE
This lecture and discussion is a continuation of General Chemistry A. Topics include equilibrium systems, periodic properties and descriptive chemistry.
General Chemistry B, CHEM 102, Mon, Wed, cas, Chemistry, Daubenmire, Summer Session B, ONLINE
CHEM 102: General Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: Mahaffey ONLINE
This lecture and discussion is a continuation of General Chemistry A. Topics include equilibrium systems, periodic properties and descriptive chemistry.
General Chemistry B, CHEM 102, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Mahaffey, Summer Session B, ONLINE
CHEM 102: General Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: Kahveci LSC
This lecture and discussion is a continuation of General Chemistry A. Topics include equilibrium systems, periodic properties and descriptive chemistry.
General Chemistry B , CHEM 102, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Kahveci, Summer Session B, LSC
CHEM 102: General Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: Lugosan LSC
This lecture and discussion is a continuation of General Chemistry A. Topics include equilibrium systems, periodic properties and descriptive chemistry.
General Chemistry B, CHEM 102, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Lugosan, Summer Session B, LSC
CHEM 102: General Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: Lugosan LSC
This lecture and discussion is a continuation of General Chemistry A. Topics include equilibrium systems, periodic properties and descriptive chemistry.
General Chemistry B, CHEM 102, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Lugosan, Summer Session B, LSC
CHEM 111: General Chemistry Lab A Session: A Instructor: Binaku LSC
This laboratory course experimentally illustrates the topics covered in the General Chemistry A.
General Chemistry Lab A, CHEM 111, Tue, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Binaku, Summer Session A, LSC
CHEM 111: General Chemistry Lab A Session: A Instructor: Basner LSC
This laboratory course experimentally illustrates the topics covered in the General Chemistry A.
General Chemistry Lab A, CHEM 111, Tue, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Basner, Summer Session A, LSC
CHEM 112: General Chemistry Lab B Session: B Instructor: Pecak LSC
This laboratory course experimentally illustrates the topics covered in the General Chemistry B lecture.
General Chemistry Lab B, CHEM 112, Tue, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Pecak, Summer Session B, LSC
CHEM 112: General Chemistry Lab B Session: B Instructor: Pecak LSC
This laboratory course experimentally illustrates the topics covered in the General Chemistry B lecture.
General Chemistry Lab B, CHEM 112, Tue, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Pecak, Summer Session B, LSC
CHEM 112: General Chemistry Lab B Session: B Instructor: Kahveci LSC
This laboratory course experimentally illustrates the topics covered in the General Chemistry B lecture.
General Chemistry Lab B, CHEM 112, Mon, Wed, cas, Chemistry, Kahveci, Summer Session B, LSC
CHEM 160: Chemical Structures & Properties Session: A Instructor: Helquist LSC
Lecture and discussion course designed to create foundational knowledge and proficiency in essential chemistry concepts and skills. Topics include atomic structure, periodic properties, bonding and properties of molecules, solid states, interactions and connections of light and matter, quantum and molecular mechanics models of atoms and molecules.
Chemical Structures & Properties, CHEM 160, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Helquist, Summer Session A, LSC
CHEM 161: Chemical Structures & Properties Lab Session: A Instructor: Basner LSC
Laboratory course designed to create foundational knowledge and proficiency in essential chemistry lab skills including developing the knowledge and use of PPE, MSDS, and Chemical labels, basic statistical analysis and graphing, proper usage of common laboratory equipment and instrumentation, and keeping a laboratory notebook and writing reports.
Chemical Structures & Properties Lab, CHEM 161, Tue, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Basner, Summer Session A, LSC
CHEM 180: Chemical Reactivity I Session: A Instructor: Helquist LSC
Lecture and discussion course designed to create foundational knowledge and proficiency in essential chemistry concepts and skills. Topics include acids and bases, buffers, chemical equilibrium, molecular thermodynamics and kinetics, nucleophilic substitutions, elimination reactions, carbonyl compounds and reactions with applications to biochemical pathways.
Chemical Reactivity I, CHEM 180, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Helquist, Summer Session A, LSC
CHEM 181: Chemical Reactivity Lab Session: A Instructor: Thomas LSC
Laboratory course designed to utilize experiments to illustrate the relationships between the structures of compounds and their resulting properties Topics include identification of compounds using chromatography, mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, and NMR, separation methods. Additional skills in analytical reasoning and information literacy will also be developed.
Chemical Reactivity Lab, CHEM 181, Tue, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Thomas, Summer Session A, LSC
CHEM 212: Quantitative Analysis Lecture Session: A Instructor: Naleway LSC
This lecture course provides an introduction to modern analytical quantitative chemistry. Topics include chemical equilibrium, statistical analysis of data as well as modern and classical methods of chemical analysis.
Quantitative Analysis Lecture, CHEM 212, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Naleway, Summer Session A, LSC
CHEM 214: Quantitative Analysis Lab Session: A Instructor: Binaku LSC
This laboratory course introduces students to classical and modern methods of chemical analysis and teaches wet chemical laboratory techniques.
Quantitative Analysis Lab, CHEM 214, Tue, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Binaku, Summer Session A, LSC
CHEM 223: Organic Chemistry A Session: A Instructor: May LSC
Lecture and discussion. First semester of a two semester sequence for non-chemistry majors. A survey of topics including stereochemistry, spectroscopy and fundamental concepts of organic chemistry. Nomenclature, properties and syntheses of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers.
Organic Chemistry A, CHEM 223, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, May, Summer Session A, LSC
CHEM 223: Organic Chemistry A Session: A Instructor: Osner ONLINE
Lecture and discussion. First semester of a two semester sequence for non-chemistry majors. A survey of topics including stereochemistry, spectroscopy and fundamental concepts of organic chemistry. Nomenclature, properties and syntheses of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers.
Organic Chemistry A, CHEM 223, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Osner, Summer Session A, ONLINE
CHEM 223: Organic Chemistry A Session: A Instructor: Osner ONLINE
Lecture and discussion. First semester of a two semester sequence for non-chemistry majors. A survey of topics including stereochemistry, spectroscopy and fundamental concepts of organic chemistry. Nomenclature, properties and syntheses of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers.
Organic Chemistry A, CHEM 223, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Osner, Summer Session A, ONLINE
CHEM 223: Organic Chemistry A Session: A Instructor: Basner ONLINE
Lecture and discussion. First semester of a two semester sequence for non-chemistry majors. A survey of topics including stereochemistry, spectroscopy and fundamental concepts of organic chemistry. Nomenclature, properties and syntheses of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers.
Organic Chemistry A, CHEM 223, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Basner, Summer Session A, ONLINE
CHEM 224: Organic Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: Szpunar LSC
Continuation of Organic Chemistry A. Organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. For non-chemistry majors.
Organic Chemistry B, CHEM 224, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Szpunar, Summer Session B, LSC
CHEM 224: Organic Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: Szpunar LSC
Continuation of Organic Chemistry A. Organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. For non-chemistry majors.
Organic Chemistry B, CHEM 224, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Szpunar, Summer Session B, LSC
CHEM 224: Organic Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: Pine ONLINE
Continuation of Organic Chemistry A. Organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. For non-chemistry majors.
Organic Chemistry B, CHEM 224, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Pine, Summer Session B, ONLINE
CHEM 224: Organic Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: Pine ONLINE
Continuation of Organic Chemistry A. Organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. For non-chemistry majors.
Organic Chemistry B, CHEM 224, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Pine, Summer Session B, ONLINE
CHEM 224: Organic Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: Balija ONLINE
Continuation of Organic Chemistry A. Organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. For non-chemistry majors.
Organic Chemistry B, CHEM 224, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Balija, Summer Session B, ONLINE
CHEM 225: Organic Chemistry Lab A Session: A Instructor: Thomas LSC
A laboratory course designed to illustrate, through experiments, the topics correspondingly covered in Organic Chemistry A. The experiments acquaint students with the laboratory practices and techniques of organic chemistry, with several involving preparation of known organic compounds. For non-chemistry majors.
Organic Chemistry Lab A, CHEM 225, Tue, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Thomas, Summer Session A, LSC
CHEM 225: Organic Chemistry Lab A Session: A Instructor: Thomas LSC
A laboratory course designed to illustrate, through experiments, the topics correspondingly covered in Organic Chemistry A. The experiments acquaint students with the laboratory practices and techniques of organic chemistry, with several involving preparation of known organic compounds. For non-chemistry majors.
Organic Chemistry Lab A, CHEM 225, Tue, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Thomas, Summer Session A, LSC
CHEM 226: Organic Chemistry Lab B Session: B Instructor: Eisenberg LSC
A laboratory course to illustrate, through experiments, certain topics covered in Organic Chemistry B. The major portion of the laboratory work involves the identification of several relatively simple organic compounds. For non- chemistry majors.
Organic Chemistry Lab B, CHEM 226, Tue, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Eisenberg, Summer Session B, LSC
CHEM 226: Organic Chemistry Lab B Session: B Instructor: Eisenberg LSC
A laboratory course to illustrate, through experiments, certain topics covered in Organic Chemistry B. The major portion of the laboratory work involves the identification of several relatively simple organic compounds. For non- chemistry majors.
Organic Chemistry Lab B, CHEM 226, Tue, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Eisenberg, Summer Session B, LSC
CHEM 300 : Undergraduate Resarch Session: A, B LSC, ONLINE
This course gives undergraduate students an opportunity to participate in research in a selected area. This class satisfies the Engaged Learning requirement in the Undergraduate Research category. Students will accomplish the research task defined in the contractual arrangement between the student and the instructor.
Undergraduate Resarch, CHEM 300 , TBA, cas, Chemistry , Summer Session A, B, LSC, ONLINE
CHEM 361: Principles of Biochemistry Session: A Instructor: May LSC
This lecture-based class focuses on the structural-functional relationships of proteins, nucleic acids and cell membranes, and metabolic pathways.
Principles of Biochemistry, CHEM 361, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, May, Summer Session A, LSC
CJC 201: Theories of Criminal Behavior Session: A Instructor: Vecchio ONLINE
This course will provide a detailed examination of past and present theories of criminal behavior, placing them in a socio-historical context and exploring their policy and practical implications. Outcomes: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of how the specific theories of criminal behavior can be compared and evaluated, how the theories evolved over time, and how they can be applied to criminal justice policy and practice
Theories of Criminal Behavior, CJC 201, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Criminal Justice and Criminology , Vecchio, Summer Session A, ONLINE
CJC 203: Policing Session: A Instructor: Donner ONLINE
This course examines the nature and purpose of policing in American society. Topical areas include the urban police function, contemporary U.S. police systems, principles of police organization and administration, basic operational methodology, and efforts to professionalize police agencies. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of changing role of police in modern society and articulate the role and challenges faced by police as it relates to the overall operation and goals of the criminal justice system.
Policing, CJC 203, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Donner, Summer Session A, ONLINE
CJC 312: Popular Culture and the Criminal Justice System Session: A Instructor: Kurti ONLINE
This course will examine the interrelationship among crime, the media, the criminal justice system, and other forms of popular culture. Topics include media representations of crime and criminal justice, social media, and the social construction of myths about crime and the criminal justice system.
Popular Culture and the Criminal Justice System, CJC 312, TBA, cas, Criminal Justice and Criminology, Kurti, Summer Session A, ONLINE
CJC 370 : Women in the Criminal Justice System Session: A Instructor: Martensen ONLINE
This course examines four areas relative to women in the criminal justice system: the historical view of female criminality; women as defendants in criminal cases and women in prison; women as victims of domestic violence and sexual assault; and women as professionals in the criminal justice system. Students will be able to describe the extent, nature and theories of female criminality and victimization and how this is consistent with and different from male criminality and victimization.
Women in the Criminal Justice System, CJC 370 , TBA, cas, Criminal Justice and Criminology , Martensen, Summer Session A, ONLINE
CJC 390: Capstone Experience Internship Session: A, B Instructor: Watkins ONLINE
The purpose of this course is to enhance the student's development and learning through observational and participatory experience in criminal justice agencies. Students will be able to contribute in a meaningful way to the operation of a specific criminal justice agency and be able to identify and describe the link between their field experience and prior courses.
Capstone Experience Internship, CJC 390, TBA, cas, Criminal Justice and Criminology , Watkins, Summer Session A, B, ONLINE
CLST 271: Classical Mythology Session: B Instructor: Livermore LSC
This course focuses on Greek and Roman literature involving myth and how ancient and modern peoples use traditional narratives, characters, images and conceptions to explore, explain, and experiment with ideas about themselves and their surroundings in their historical, social, cultural and intellectual contexts. Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the fundamental myths of the ancient Greek and Roman world, their language and possible meanings, and how myth reflected important collective and individual concerns, values, beliefs, and practices then, even as modern myth does now.
Classical Mythology, CLST 271, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Classical Studies, Livermore, Summer Session B, LSC
CLST 272: Heroes & Classical Epics (WI) Session: B Instructor: Shellko ONLINE
This course centers upon the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey and Vergil’s Aeneid and endeavors to place these epic poems into their historical, social, and cultural contexts. Students will learn the definition of epic as a literary genre and discover how this genre evolved to reflect audiences and times. You will learn the components of epic language, in particular, literary devices and structural features (e.g., formulas, nested stories, epic similes). Students will be able to describe the plots of the three epics and know the main- and mid-level human characters, gods, and goddesses. In addition, students will be able to define and better understand the meanings of “hero” and “heroism.” Learning how the epics are variously interpreted as well as basic methods of literary criticism (e.g., analysis of language, content, structure, etc.), students will employ these as ways to understand and interpret the poems.
Heroes & Classical Epics (WI), CLST 272, Mon, Wed, cas, Classical Studies, Shellko, Summer Session B, ONLINE
CLST 273 WI: Classical Tragedy - (WI) Session: A Instructor: Shellko ONLINE
This course introduces students to extant Greek tragic drama, especially through the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of plot, characters and themes in Greek drama; understanding of the historical, social and cultural conditions implicated with each work; comprehension of concerns and values contained in them, such as justice, and how these are mirrored in modern literature and drama.
Classical Tragedy - (WI), CLST 273 WI, Tue, Thurs, cas, Classical Studies, Shellko, Summer Session A, ONLINE
COMM 101: Public Speaking / Critical-Thinking Session: A Instructor: Romanelli ONLINE
This introductory course is designed to supply students with the skills of public address, a fundamental understanding of critical thinking practices, foundational tenets of communication theory, a grasp of the relationship between context and communication, and a sense of the social responsibility that comes with the capacity for communication.
Public Speaking / Critical-Thinking, COMM 101, TBA, communication, Communication, Romanelli, Summer Session A, ONLINE
COMM 101: Public Speaking and Critical Thinking Session: B Instructor: O'Connor ONLINE
This introductory course is designed to supply students with the skills of public address, a fundamental understanding of critical thinking practices, foundational tenets of communication theory, a grasp of the relationship between context and communication, and a sense of the social responsibility that comes with the capacity for communication.
Public Speaking and Critical Thinking, COMM 101, Sat, communication, scps, Communication, O'Connor, Summer Session B, ONLINE
COMM 103: Business & Professional Speaking Session: B Instructor: Lamberti ONLINE
This course emphasizes communication in organizational settings, and examines the theory and practice of catering oral presentations for specific audiences.
Business & Professional Speaking, COMM 103, TBA, communication, Communication, Lamberti, Summer Session B, ONLINE
COMM 175: Introduction to Communication Session: B Instructor: TBA ONLINE
This course gives a general historical and theoretical overview of communication. By looking at communication through a critical, historical and theoretical lens, students will acquire an intellectual framework for further study and practice in communication.
Introduction to Communication, COMM 175, TBA, communication, TBA, Summer Session B, ONLINE
COMM 175 : Introduction to Communication Session: A Instructor: Keane ONLINE
This course gives a general historical and theoretical overview of communication. By looking at communication through a critical, historical and theoretical lens, students will acquire an intellectual framework for further study and practice in communication. Students will increase communication literacy.
Introduction to Communication, COMM 175 , Tue, communication, scps, SCPS, Keane, Summer Session A, ONLINE
COMM 200: Communication and New Media Session: A Instructor: Dougherty ONLINE
This course explores the ways technology affects personal, cultural, and mass communication through examining the historical, societal, and ethical implications of newer and interactive forms of media. Students use audio, video, and digital tools to research and produce essays, projects, and presentations that analyze the impact of technology on communication.
Communication and New Media, COMM 200, TBA, communication, Communication, Dougherty, Summer Session A, ONLINE
COMM 205: Reporting Basics I Session: B Instructor: Rogers ONLINE
This course examines current issues in U.S. journalism with strong emphasis on developing skills in news reporting, interviewing, and writing. News Judgment; Writing Concisely and Clearly; Writing on Deadline; AP Style; Interviewing Techniques; Grammar, Spelling & Punctuation; Ethics & Legal Issues; Basic Research Methods.
Reporting Basics I, COMM 205, TBA, communication, Communication, Rogers, Summer Session B, ONLINE
COMM 210: Principles of Public Relations Session: B Instructor: Yim ONLINE
Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the roles and practices of the public relations professional, develop PR plans, and create a portfolio.
Principles of Public Relations, COMM 210, TBA, communication, Communication, Yim, Summer Session B, ONLINE
COMM 211: Principles of Advertising Session: B Instructor: TBA ONLINE
This introduction to advertising provides an overview of the theory and hands-on practice of advertising including planning, strategy, creative development, and media planning. Elements of direct response, promotion, Internet, and public relations are also presented. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles of advertising and practice creative and decision-making skills in developing an advertising campaign.
Principles of Advertising, COMM 211, TBA, communication, Communication, TBA, Summer Session B, ONLINE
COMM 213 : COMM 213 Digital Foundations Session: A Instructor: TBA ONLINE
Students will be introduced to digital media tools, including online content creation, SEO, website management, email marketing, social media engagement, digital advertising, analytics and emerging technologies that are used to create and build integrated digital campaigns for advertising and public relations. Students will have the ability to demonstrate elementary knowledge of digital communication tools. Practical understanding and capabilities for creating content across a wide range of media platforms. Knowledge of digital media platform technical requirements.
COMM 213 Digital Foundations, COMM 213 , TBA, communication, Communication, TBA, Summer Session A, ONLINE
COMM 215: Ethics and Communication Session: A Instructor: Brown ONLINE
This course explores various approaches to ethical decision-making and applies that process to diverse aspects of every day, contemporary life. Students learn to discern a wide variety of ethical issues concerning communication behavior, apply systematic ethical analysis to various communication situations, and explain their analyses clearly.
Ethics and Communication, COMM 215, TBA, communication, Communication, Brown, Summer Session A, ONLINE
COMM 261 : Social Media Session: A Instructor: Kamerer ONLINE
Starting from the foundation of traditional offline business and social communities and communication, this course will show how the real relationships of online business and social communities use content to build personal and business success at the speed and reach of the Internet. Articulate how the Internet and social media has changed the way we produce and consume content and how social media has affected the way we work, shop, and interact online and off.
Social Media, COMM 261 , Tue, communication, scps, SCPS, Kamerer, Summer Session A, ONLINE
COMM 274: Introduction to Cinema Session: A Instructor: TBA ONLINE
This course is an introduction to the study of cinema as a complex medium of communication. Students will be provided with the basic terminology, observational skills, and theoretical background for the study of film aesthetics, language, cultural analysis, history, and the production of cinematic texts. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic approaches to film studies such as formal analysis, critical practices, and narrative studies.
Introduction to Cinema, COMM 274, TBA, communication, Communication, TBA, Summer Session A, ONLINE
COMM 274: Introduction to Cinema Session: B Instructor: Abouelazm ONLINE
This course is an introduction to the study of cinema as a complex medium of communication. Students will be provided with the basic terminology, observational skills, and theoretical background for the study of film aesthetics, language, cultural analysis, history, and the production of cinematic texts. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic approaches to film studies such as formal analysis, critical practices, and narrative studies.
Introduction to Cinema, COMM 274, TBA, communication, Communication, Abouelazm, Summer Session B, ONLINE
COMM 318 : Public Relations Writing Session: C Instructor: Macon ONLINE
This course focuses on strategis public relations, writing for publics including print, broadcast and digital media with understanding of objectives, news values and formats. Students develop competency writing and editing news releases, pitch letters, fact sheets, public service announcements, newsletters, and Web content to develop a portfolio of individual writing samples.
Public Relations Writing, COMM 318 , TBA, communication, scps, SCPS, Macon, Summer Session C, ONLINE
COMM 370: Special Topics: Advertising/Public Relations - Social Media and Issue Mgmt Session: A Instructor: Yim ONLINE
These are advanced courses in specialized AD/PR areas. Titles and content vary and prerequisites are established according to course content. May be repeated with different topics for a total of 9 credit hours, but only 6 may count toward the major.
Special Topics: Advertising/Public Relations - Social Media and Issue Mgmt, COMM 370, TBA, communication, Communication, Yim, Summer Session A, ONLINE
COMM 370: Special Topics Advertising/Public Relations - Advertising in the Metaverse Session: B Instructor: Rheu ONLINE
These are advanced courses in specialized AD/PR areas. Titles and content vary and prerequisites are established according to course content. May be repeated with different topics for a total of 9 credit hours, but only 6 may count toward the major.
Special Topics Advertising/Public Relations - Advertising in the Metaverse, COMM 370, TBA, communication, Rheu, Summer Session B, ONLINE
COMM 378: AD/PR Practicum Session: C Instructor: Slania ONLINE
Students gain advanced practical experience in service experiential learning projects.
AD/PR Practicum, COMM 378, TBA, communication, Communication, Slania, Summer Session C, ONLINE
COMM 381: Communication Practicum Session: C Instructor: Slania ONLINE
Students gain advanced practical experience in service experiential learning projects.
Communication Practicum, COMM 381, TBA, communication, Communication, Slania, Summer Session C, ONLINE
COMM 382: MJRN Practicum Session: C Instructor: Slania ONLINE
Students gain hands-on practical experience in developing multimedia journalism projects.
MJRN Practicum, COMM 382, TBA, communication, Communication, Slania, Summer Session C, ONLINE
COMM 384: FDMD Practicum Session: C Instructor: Slania ONLINE
Students will gain advanced practical experience creating digital cinema projects.
FDMD Practicum, COMM 384, TBA, communication, Communication, Slania, Summer Session C, ONLINE
COMM 391: Advertising /Public Relations Internship Session: C Instructor: Morris ONLINE
This supervised field experience enables students to have hands-on professional learning at a wide range of agency, corporate, and non-profit organizations as the basis for learning and refining professional communication skills.
Advertising /Public Relations Internship, COMM 391, Mon, communication, Communication, Morris, Summer Session C, ONLINE
COMM 392: Internship - Journalism Session: C Instructor: Lamberti ONLINE
This supervised field experience enables students to have hands-on professional learning at a wide range of agency, corporate, and non-profit organizations as the basis for learning and refining professional communication skills. Students gain proficiency in professional conduct and industry skills while systematically reflecting on their experiences.
Internship - Journalism, COMM 392, TBA, communication, Communication, Lamberti, Summer Session C, ONLINE
COMM 393: Internship - Communication Studies Session: C Instructor: McPhilimy ONLINE
This supervised field experience uses experiential learning at a wide variety of corporate, professional, and non-profit organizations as the basis for learning and refining communication skills. Students will be able to demonstrate skill proficiency as required at their sites, professional conduct, and systematic reflection on their experiences.
Internship - Communication Studies, COMM 393, TBA, communication, Communication, McPhilimy, Summer Session C, ONLINE
COMM 394: Internship - Film and Digital Media Session: C Instructor: Abouelazm ONLINE
This supervised field experience enables students to have hands-on professional learning at a wide range of agency, corporate, and non-profit organizations as the basis for learning and refining professional communication skills.
Internship - Film and Digital Media, COMM 394, TBA, communication, Communications, Abouelazm, Summer Session C, ONLINE
COMM 398 : Directed Study Session: C Instructor: Slania ONLINE
Students may sign up for a one to three credit hour course to work independently in the student's area of interest with a supervising faculty member whose expertise is in that area. Projects may include, but are not limited to: a reading course, where the student contracts to read and create an annotated bibliography of research materials, a writing course, where a student has developed a strong paper for a course and wants to refine it for possible conference presentation and/or publication.
Directed Study, COMM 398 , TBA, communication, Slania, Summer Session C, ONLINE
COMP 125: Visual Information Processing Session: C Instructor: Wetzel ONLINE
This course, intended primarily for non-majors, provides an introduction to computer programming using a language well-suited to beginning programmers and practical applications, e.g., Visual Basic.Net. Outcome: Understanding of computer mechanisms for representing and analyzing numerical and logical information and the power of programmability; practical ability to implement useful computing tools.
Visual Information Processing, COMP 125, TBA, cas, Computer Science, Wetzel, Summer Session C, ONLINE
COMP 141: Introduction to Computing Tool and Techniques Session: Full Instructor: Hishon ONLINE
This course introduces students to the Unix shell environment and essential tools for succeeding in computer science degrees. Students who complete this course will develop fluency in the Unix (Linux) environment, which is essential for solving problems in academic, research, and professional computing disciplines.
Introduction to Computing Tool and Techniques, COMP 141, Thurs, cas, Computer Science, Hishon, Summer Session Full, ONLINE
COMP 150: Introduction to Computing Session: A Instructor: O'Sullivan ONLINE
The world overflows with electronic data. This course introduces programming in a simple, powerful language like Python, with selection, repetition, functions, graphical effects, and dynamic interaction with the Internet, plus connections to lower level computer organization and computer implications in the wider world.
Introduction to Computing, COMP 150, Tue, Thurs, cas, Computer Science, O'Sullivan, Summer Session A, ONLINE
COMP 163: Discrete Structures Session: Full Instructor: Viswanathan ONLINE
This course covers the mathematical foundations of computer science, including such topics as complexity of algorithms, modular arithmetic, induction and proof techniques, graph theory, combinatorics, Boolean algebra, logic circuits, and automata.
Discrete Structures, COMP 163, Mon, Wed, cas, Computer Science, Viswanathan, Summer Session Full, ONLINE
COMP 170: Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming Session: Full Instructor: Irakliotis ONLINE
This introductory course to the computer science major covers basic concepts of object-oriented (OO) programming languages. It will address the following questions: What is an algorithm? How does one write, debug, run (execute), and test an effective computer program? How does one convert an algorithm into a computer program? How does one judge a program? What does "object-oriented" mean? Topics include: variables, data types, input/output, loops and repetition, Boolean expressions and logic, arrays, subprograms, classes/objects, OO principles. This course is programming intensive. Lab sessions and assigned work will be take place both during synchronous online class periods and on your own time. For more information see: http://people.cs.luc.edu/whonig/Comp170 .
Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming, COMP 170, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Computer Science, Irakliotis, Summer Session Full, ONLINE
COMP 271: Data Structures I Session: Full Instructor: Honig LSC
This course studies basic data structures including array lists, linked lists, stacks, queues, binary trees, and hash tables. Efficiency of data structure operations, study of recursion, applications of data structures, and simple analysis of algorithms are covered. Outcome: Students will learn to design new data structures as well as learn to use existing data structures in applications.
Data Structures I, COMP 271, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Computer Science, Honig, Summer Session Full, LSC
COMP 301: Introduction to Computer Security Session: Full Instructor: Schmitz ONLINE
This is an introductory course on computer security covering a broad range of topics, including basic security goals, encryption, penetration testing, software exploitation, reverse engineering, packet sniffing, and secure coding. The course teaches both the principles and concepts of computer security as well as some of the tools and technologies.
Introduction to Computer Security, COMP 301, TBA, cas, Computer Science, Schmitz, Summer Session Full, ONLINE
COMP 313: Object-Oriented Design Session: Full Instructor: Yacobellis ONLINE
Object-orientation continues to be a dominant approach to software development. This intermediate programming-intensive course studies the use of classes and objects with an emphasis on collaboration among objects. A thorough understanding of the principles of object-orientation: abstraction, delegation, inheritance, and polymorphism; exposure to basic design patterns; programming experience in mainstream object-oriented languages such as C++ and Java.
Object-Oriented Design, COMP 313, Tue, Thurs, cas, Computer Science, Yacobellis, Summer Session Full, ONLINE
COMP 317: Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Computing Session: A Instructor: Dordal ONLINE
This course covers social, legal, and ethical issues commonly arising in key areas related to computing technologies. Understanding of laws and issues in areas such as privacy, encryption, freedom of speech, copyrights and patents, computer crime, and computer/software reliability and safety; understanding of philosophical perspectives such as utilitarianism versus deontological ethics and basics of the U.S. legal system.
Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Computing, COMP 317, Mon, Wed, cas, Computer Science, Dordal, Summer Session A, ONLINE
COMP 391: Internship in Computer Science Session: A, B, C Instructor: Yacobellis ONLINE
Students work outside the classroom applying and extending their computer science skills, typically for at least 150 hours for 3 credits. A memorandum of understanding is required between a student, his or her employer, and the Undergraduate Program Director, followed by final reports from the student and the employer.
Internship in Computer Science, COMP 391, TBA, cas, Computer Science, Yacobellis, Summer Session A, B, C, ONLINE
COMP 398: Independent Study Session: A, B Instructor: Various ONLINE
The student and a sponsoring faculty member will determine an advanced topic for the student to work on. Outcome: Knowledge of an advanced topic.
Independent Study, COMP 398, TBA, cas, Computer Science, Various, Summer Session A, B, ONLINE
COMP 400A : Object-Oriented Programming Session: Full Instructor: Irakliotis ONLINE
This programming intensive course with its weekly lab component provides an exploration in problem solving for graduate-level courses, using object-oriented programming in a language such as Java. Outcomes: To analyze and decompose problems, specify algorithms, and construct solutions by synthesizing classes, objects and other components of object
Object-Oriented Programming, COMP 400A , Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Computer Science, Irakliotis, Summer Session Full, ONLINE
COMP 417: Social and Ethical Issues in Computing Session: A Instructor: Montes ONLINE
This course covers social, legal, and ethical issues commonly arising in key areas related to computing technologies. Understanding of laws and issues in areas such as privacy, encryption, freedom of speech, copyrights and patents, computer crime, and computer/software reliability and safety; understanding of philosophical perspectives such as utilitarianism versus deontological ethics and basics of the U.S. legal system.
Social and Ethical Issues in Computing, COMP 417, TBA, cas, tgs, Computer Science Graduate , Montes, Summer Session A, ONLINE
CPST 200: Introduction to Degree Completion Session: C Instructor: Teetsov ONLINE
CPST 200 exists to give newly admitted adult students a chance to ease themselves back into the academic environment while highlighting all of the tools and services available through the university. Outcomes: Exposure to/familiarity with LUC resources. Improved academic writing through use of multiple drafts.
Introduction to Degree Completion, CPST 200, Thurs, scps, SCPS, Teetsov, Summer Session C, ONLINE
CPST 201: Civic Identity and Development Session: C Instructor: Teetsov ONLINE
This course engages students in exploration of their self-perception and the ways in which they are perceived by others, especially the workplace. The course continues to consider both the development of personal goals and consistent feedback for positive change. Students will develop the themes of leadership and management in the context of the "five hungers" of Loyola's document of Transformative Education. Students will develop a professional identity profile and define a personal set of goals by managing an online profile of accomplishments and develop a written strategy to support personal goals with measures of progress.
Civic Identity and Development, CPST 201, Thurs, scps, SCPS, Teetsov, Summer Session C, ONLINE
CPST 245: Macroeconomics Session: C Instructor: Lane
Introduces economic analysis that studies system wide phenomena including inflation, economic growth and development and unemployment. Includes a focus on behavioral economics, and provides students with an opportunity to analyze real world economic and public policy decisions that have been influenced by non-economic factors included within its field. Outcomes: 1. Explain the law of supply and demand 2. Describe the nature of macroeconomic issues and problems 3. Articulate the objectives of monetary and fiscal policies and the function of the two principal policy makers 4. Analyze historical macroeconomic crises 5. Discuss basic macroeconomic goals such as GDP, CPI and unemployment 6. Assess public policy decisions from a behavioral economic perspective
Macroeconomics, CPST 245, Tue, scps, SCPS, Lane, Summer Session C
CPST 250: Foundations of Organizations Session: A Instructor: Stocker ONLINE
An introduction to contemporary management with emphasis on organizational culture, decision making, organizational structure and design, planning, communication and information technology. Outcome: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the managerial roles in organizations, the four levels at which behavior is examined in organizations and will develop a framework for basic business operations.
Foundations of Organizations, CPST 250, Mon, scps, SCPS, Stocker, Summer Session A, ONLINE
CPST 310: Accounting Principles & Applications Session: C Instructor: Vulic ONLINE
This course introduces major concepts in the areas of financial and managerial accounting and develops understanding of accounting process and principles. Students will gain a deeper understanding of financial statements, accounting mechanics, accrual accounting, financial planning, variance analysis, internal controls and financial and financial analysis. Outcomes: Students will gain a deeper understanding of financial statements, accounting mechanics, accrual accounting, financial planning, variance analysis, internal controls and financial and financial analysis. The students will complete a final course project that demonstrates their ability to manage the financial data of a fictional organization.
Accounting Principles & Applications, CPST 310, TBA, scps, SCPS, Vulic, Summer Session C, ONLINE
CPST 335: Law and Regulations for Organizational Leaders Session: A Instructor: Depinto ONLINE
The role of the organization (for profit, non-profit and governmental) from the dual perspective of private and public law. Includes foundations of law and judicial process; contracts, torts, and property law; intellectual property rights; legal, securities and employment regulations; ethical considerations and policy issues. Outcomes: -Differentiate ethics and law/private and public law -Discuss Constitutional Law and government¿s role to regulate business -Apply basic legal principles to the private market -Explain legal principles of contracts
Law and Regulations for Organizational Leaders, CPST 335, Wed, scps, SCPS, Depinto, Summer Session A, ONLINE
CPST 341: User Experience Design to Drive Business Session: C Instructor: Ho ONLINE
In this course students will learn how to connect and align business objectives with UX Design goals. Students will learn how to bring high-level planning into concrete actionable steps. Students learn Strategy for continuously Developing Brand and Identity through Design.
User Experience Design to Drive Business, CPST 341, Wed, scps, SCPS, Ho, Summer Session C, ONLINE
CPST 349: Project Management Session: C Instructor: Vonder Heide ONLINE
The art and science of project management as applied to a variety of business, commercial, and public management situations. Covers all phases of the project life-cycle; techniques for planning, scheduling and control of projects; project organizations; and techniques for building effective project teams. Students will gain a working knowledge of the fundamental principles and techniques of effective project management, and how to apply these principles and techniques in the business environment.
Project Management, CPST 349, Tue, scps, SCPS, Vonder Heide, Summer Session C, ONLINE
CPST 370: Leadership Theory & Application Session: B Instructor: Stocker ONLINE
Students will study leadership theory, concepts and the practical application of leadership at all levels. Students will analyze historical approaches to leadership and focus on influential contemporary leadership perspectives such as servant leadership, situational leadership, transformational leadership, and principle-centered leadership. Outcome: Students will complete a leadership development plan and apply leadership theories to workplace situations through reflection, real-life examples, and case studies.
Leadership Theory & Application, CPST 370, TBA, scps, SCPS, Stocker, Summer Session B, ONLINE
DANC 394 : Internship in Dance Session: B Instructor: Kaufmann LSC
Dance students complete a semester long internship providing an opportunity to use their technical, research or organizations skills in a professional setting. Students must complete and reflect upon 50 hours of internship experience per credit hour that is pre-approved by the Department of Fine and Performing Arts. Department permission is required.
Internship in Dance , DANC 394 , TBA, cas, Dance, Kaufmann, Summer Session B, LSC
DANC 395: Independent Study Session: A, B Instructor: Kaufmann LSC
Independent study projects may be of various kinds and in any recognized area of the dance. Such projects should be done under the close supervision of a dance faculty member.
Independent Study , DANC 395, TBA, cas, Dance , Kaufmann, Summer Session A, B, LSC
DANC 397: Fieldwork in Chicago/Dance Session: A, B Instructor: Kaufmann LSC
Variable credit (1-6 hours) given for performances or projects undertaken with professional dance organizations outside the university. Students keep a journal and write evaluative papers, Permission of the Department of Fine and Performing Arts Required. Repeatable for up to 6 credit hours, however no more than 6 credit hours of Internship or Fieldwork can be applied to the major.
Fieldwork in Chicago/Dance, DANC 397, TBA, cas, Dance, Kaufmann, Summer Session A, B, LSC
ECON 201: Principles of Microeconomics Session: A Instructor: Komnenos ONLINE
Requirement: ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of Anthropology, Department of Criminal Justice, Department of Economics, Department of Psychology, Department of Political Science, the Department of Sociology, Human Services or the School of Nursing. This course is an introduction to demand and supply, consumer choice, price analysis in alternative industrial organizations, and the distribution of income. Students will be able to think critically about price formation in different market structures, and how prices, household incomes and income distribution in a diverse society are determined with interpretations based on the concepts of opportunity costs and decision making under uncertainty.
Principles of Microeconomics, ECON 201, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Komnenos, Summer Session A, ONLINE
ECON 201: Principles of Microeconomics Session: B Instructor: Plott ONLINE
Requirement: ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of Anthropology, Department of Criminal Justice, Department of Economics, Department of Psychology, Department of Political Science, the Department of Sociology, Human Services or the School of Nursing. This course is an introduction to demand and supply, consumer choice, price analysis in alternative industrial organizations, and the distribution of income. Students will be able to think critically about price formation in different market structures, and how prices, household incomes and income distribution in a diverse society are determined with interpretations based on the concepts of opportunity costs and decision making under uncertainty.
Principles of Microeconomics, ECON 201, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Economics, Plott, Summer Session B, ONLINE
ECON 202: Principles of Macroeconomics Session: B Instructor: Barnes ONLINE
Requirement: ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of Anthropology, Department of Criminal Justice, Department of Economics, Department of Psychology, Department of Political Science, the Department of Sociology, Human Services or the School of Nursing. This course is an introduction to national product, its components, money and the real sectors and business fluctuations. Students will be able to think critically about the economic environment of the nation and to measure growth, unemployment, inflation, fiscal and monetary policies of the government, to ultimately understand economic stability and the welfare of the individual citizen.
Principles of Macroeconomics, ECON 202, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Economics, Barnes, Summer Session B, ONLINE
ECON 303: Intermediate Microeconomics Session: A Instructor: Trevino ONLINE
This course is a detailed study of consumer and firm behavior, market structures, and the elementary propositions concerning welfare economics. Students will develop analytical skills to understand and predict consumer and firm behavior, understand the underlying pinning of antitrust legislation and dynamic market strategies.
Intermediate Microeconomics, ECON 303, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Economics, Trevino, Summer Session A, ONLINE
ECON 304: Intermediate Macroeconomics Session: B Instructor: Heiney ONLINE
This course develops the framework used by economists in government, business and academia to analyze the key determinants of economic growth, the business cycle, unemployment, inflation, the level of interest and exchange rates, as well as explaining how all these variables are influenced by monetary and fiscal policy.
Intermediate Macroeconomics, ECON 304, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Heiney, Summer Session B, ONLINE
ENGL 210 (WI): Business Writing Session: A Instructor: Meinhardt ONLINE
Business Writing is a seminar designed to build and improve effective communication practices for use in the business community. The ideas of personal professionalism and priority of purposes guide an exploration of business writing genres ranging from correspondence to memos, and from employment documents to executive summaries. Collaboration, peer interaction, and individual economy direct the creation of a series of writing projects that use revision and research as a necessary step in the writing process. ENGL 210-20W is a writing intensive class.
Business Writing, ENGL 210 (WI), Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, English, Meinhardt, Summer Session A, ONLINE
ENGL 271--WI: Exploring Poetry Session: A Instructor: Meinhardt ONLINE
This synchronous online seminar establishes a foundation from which to ground, understand, situate, analyze, and even create contemporary poetry in a vigorous and rewarding way. We will use asynchronous contact for some activities as well, but the synchronous participation is mandatory. We are here to explore principles of poetry structure and writing through a combination of lectures, craft analyses, writing exercises, assigned reading, in-class reading, discussion, and assigned writing projects; but this is a writing course, designed to develop analytical and aesthetic skills, most notably through student critical awareness of the places a writer may inhabit in the greater genre of poetry and how and why this may have value to the student as a student, scholar, writer and world citizen. The course establishes a poetic historical/ontological framework in order to recognize the general arc of the art-form. We will then explore a general critical sensibility of poetry structure, writing, technique, and purpose using established writers¿ poems and perspectives on craft. We will examine genre, structure and style as an avenue of interpretation, classification and creation. The final stage of the course focuses on analysis of value assessment for poetry in a contemporary setting, particularly within a contemporary capitalist framework. The course is designed to cultivate an authentic and lifelong appreciation of the myriad ways that poetry shapes contemporary life and/or could with more and better awareness and exposure; and the course will satisfy a Writing-Intensive requirement.
Exploring Poetry, ENGL 271--WI, Tue, Thurs, cas, English, Meinhardt, Summer Session A, ONLINE
ENGL 272 (WI): Exploring Drama Session: B Instructor: Kessel LSC
n this course we will explore the components of drama by examining the adaptation of several plays into the medium of film. We will read, discuss, and write about plays from different time periods and in different genres, including drama, comedy, and musical. All of these plays represent the relationships and complex emotions of human beings as individuals, as family members, and as members of society. We will begin by reading and discussing each of the original stage plays and then viewing the film into which it was adapted. When possible, we will view videos of the plays performed on stage. Applying theory of adaptation, we will think about how transference from the stage to the screen changes dramatization. How do the director, adaptor, screen actors, and the medium of film itself alter the vision of the original work? Students will be asked to write three short analytical papers and a take-home final. This course fulfills a Writing Intensive requirement.
Exploring Drama, ENGL 272 (WI), Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, English, Kessel, Summer Session B, LSC
ENGL 273 : Exploring Fiction Session: A Instructor: Quirk LSC
The course will focus on Great American Short Novels. We will read a short novel each week and the course will survey the arc of the American novel from the mid-nineteenth to the twenty-first century. Our organizing theme will be the American Dream and related issues of money and success, the individual and community, and gender, race, and identity. Readings may include novels by Herman Melville, Rebecca Harding Davis, Kate Chopin, Abraham Cahan, James Weldon Johnson, Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Nathaniel West, Nella Larsen, Saul Bellow, Gwendolyn Brooks, Julie Otsuka, Sandra Cisneros, and Jay McInerney. The course will be reading-intensive with regular quizzes, short response papers, and a final exam.
Exploring Fiction, ENGL 273 , Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, English, Quirk, Summer Session A, LSC
ENGL 373: Exploring Fiction Session: B Instructor: Mann ONLINE
This is a writing intensive class. A grade of C- or better in UCWR 110 is required to enroll. ENGL 273-01W #1795 is a writing-intensive class and is being taught in person at the LSC. Adopting an international perspective, this section of English 273 will focus on selected novels from Africa, the West Indies, South Asia, UK, and USA. Our main aim will be to examine the portrayal of such issues as nationalism, religion, race, ethnicity, gender/sexuality, and class/caste in the texts under study. In addition, we will analyze the cultural bases of contributing techniques, including structure, language, narrative focus, and characterization among others, to arrive at comparative assessments of the diverse fictional voices of modern and contemporary world writers. This course satisfies 3 credits of the Core Curriculum Tier-II requirement in Literary Knowledge & Experience. For English majors, the course counts as a 200-level elective for both the major and minor and also meets the 3-credit multicultural requirement.
Exploring Fiction, ENGL 373, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, English, Mann, Summer Session B, ONLINE
ENGL 283 : Women in Literature Session: B Instructor: Bradshaw ONLINE
Women in Literature focuses on divas and diva culture. Revered and reviled, imitated and appropriated, divas are the most visible women in our culture. They are also the most misunderstood. On the one hand, the diva represents empowerment¿she is loud, courageous, and often outrageous. But her power comes at a great cost: when she is consumed and absorbed into fans¿ lives, she risks becoming the object of obsession. She also risks losing her identity, even as she serves as a vehicle for shaping others¿. This class uses fiction, drama, biography, autobiography, film, and performance theory to explore the paradoxes and problems of the ¿woman with a voice¿ and her place in contemporary conceptions of femininity.
Women in Literature, ENGL 283 , Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, English, Bradshaw, Summer Session B, ONLINE
ENGL 290 - WI: Human Values in Literature Session: A Instructor: Hopwood ONLINE
Are you tired? Exhausted? Burnt out? It's been a year! More accurately, it's been decades of grinding, fighting, and working. We've come to value labor and production over rest and self-care, even in (especially in) moments of crisis and unrest. What if care and rest were forms of capital? Or were used as a means of resistance? Or could be accessed to tell the stories that have gone untold? This course will revolve around care and rest as a means of liberation, both historically and today. We will interrogate contemporary "grind culture" and look toward self-care, social movements, and resistance to better understand the values we ascribe to work, play, and rest. Literature will explore themes of labor, healing, trauma, capitalism, liberation, justice, and resistance, mindfulness. We will read texts by Sayaka Murata, Jenny Odell, Herman Melville, Ross Gay, Henry David Thoreau, and Octavia Butler.
Human Values in Literature, ENGL 290 - WI, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, English, Hopwood, Summer Session A, ONLINE
ENGL 317 : The Writing of Poetry Session: B Instructor: Rydel ONLINE
Registration is reserved for RN-BSN and SCPS students. Non-SCPS/RN-BSN students can request permission to enroll. For more information go to http://www.luc.edu/adult-education/admission/nonscps-enrollment/ Asynchronous Class Meeting: All instruction for this section will be delivered online asynchronously. This course provides extensive practice in both the reading and the writing of poetry. Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the critical skills necessary for discussing, analyzing and formulating arguments about poetry, and will produce a portfolio of original poems.
The Writing of Poetry , ENGL 317 , TBA, scps, SCPS, Rydel, Summer Session B, ONLINE
ENGL 394: Internship Session: A, B Instructor: Cragwall ONLINE
English 394 provides practical, on-the-job experience for English majors in adapting their writing and analytical skills to the needs of such fields as publishing, editing, and public relations. Students must have completed six courses in English and must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher before applying for an internship. Qualified second semester juniors and seniors may apply to the program. Interested students must arrange to meet with the Internship Director during the pre-registration period and must bring with them a copy of their Loyola transcripts, a detailed resume (which includes the names and phone numbers of at least two references), and at least three writing samples. Students may be required to conduct part of their job search on-line and to go out on job interviews before the semester begins. Course requirements include: completion of a minimum of 120 hours of work; periodic meetings with the Internship Director; a written evaluation of job performance by the site supervisor; a term paper, including samples of writing produced on the job.
Internship, ENGL 394, TBA, cas, English, Cragwall, Summer Session A, B, ONLINE
ENGL 399: Special Studies in Literature Session: A, B Instructor: Cragwall ONLINE
Students arrange for this course on an individual basis by consulting a faculty member who agrees to supervise the independent study. When the student and the faculty member have agreed on the work to be done, the student submits the plan to the director of undergraduate programs for approval and registration. Usually students will work independently and produce a research paper, under the direction of the faculty member.
Special Studies in Literature, ENGL 399, TBA, cas, English, Cragwall, Summer Session A, B, ONLINE
ENVS 101: The Scientific Basis of Environmental Issues Session: B Instructor: Dinsmore ONLINE
The foundational course in science is predicated on the view that understanding environmental issues and their underlying scientific principles will occupy a central role in our students' lives and will be critical in their development as informed and participating members of society. The overarching strategy of the course will be to frame environmental science in terms of a series of interacting systems to allow students to analyze a variety of environmental issues.
The Scientific Basis of Environmental Issues, ENVS 101, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, ses, School of Environmental Sustainability , Dinsmore, Summer Session B, ONLINE
ENVS 101 : The Scientific Basis of Environmental Issues Session: C Instructor: Lee ONLINE
The foundational course in science is predicated on the view that understanding environmental issues and their underlying scientific principles will occupy a central role in our students' lives and will be critical in their development as informed and participating members of society. The overarching strategy of the course will be to frame environmental science in terms of a series of interacting systems to allow students to analyze a variety of environmental issues. At the end of the course, students will exhibit knowledge of the nature of the four Earth systems, draw inferences from evidence, constructing testable and falsifiable hypotheses and analyzing data, understand the role of energy and thermodynamics in ecosystems, and understand and describe important cycles in nature.
The Scientific Basis of Environmental Issues, ENVS 101 , Wed, scps, SCPS, Lee, Summer Session C, ONLINE
ENVS 223: Soil Ecology Session: Early Instructor: Sinche LURECOFF
This course introduces the properties, functions, and conservation of soil. Topics include belowground ecosystem services, soil biodiversity, biogeochemical cycles, and conservation, human impacts to soils, and the socioeconomic implications of soil degradation. Lectures, laboratory/field soil testing, field trips, and presentations by experts in sustainable soil management are employed.
Soil Ecology, ENVS 223, TBA, ses, School of Environmental Sustainability, Sinche, Summer Session Early, LUREC, OFF
ENVS 224 : Climate & Climate Change Session: A Instructor: DiMaio LSC
This course introduces students to basic principles and knowledge to explain climate change. Students will learn about natural and anthropogenic causes of climate change, the interactions between earth-atmosphere-ocean systems, climate feedback mechanisms, and impacts of climate change on the natural physical environment.
Climate & Climate Change, ENVS 224 , Mon, Wed, ses, School of Environmental Sustainability , DiMaio, Summer Session A, LSC
ENVS 224 : Climate & Climate Change Session: C Instructor: DiMaio ONLINE
This course introduces students to basic principles and knowledge to explain climate change. Students will learn about natural and anthropogenic causes of climate change, the interactions between earth-atmosphere-ocean systems, climate feedback mechanisms, and impacts of climate change on the natural physical environment. Students will develop cognitive and mathematical skills to draw valid, logical conclusions regarding various observed phenomena such as observed changes in the climate system and observed impacts of climate change.
Climate & Climate Change, ENVS 224 , Tue, scps, SCPS, DiMaio, Summer Session C, ONLINE
ENVS 280: Principles of Ecology Session: Early Instructor: Dybzinski LURECOFF
The purpose of this course is to foster an in-depth understanding of ecology, the study of relationships between organisms and the environment at organizational scales ranging from genes, individuals, and populations to communities, ecosystems, and landscapes. Topics include population dynamics, species interactions, community dynamics, food webs, ecosystem functions, and landscape ecology with a strong emphasis on scientific inquiry and data interpretation. Outcome: Students will understand key concepts and principles concerning ecological processes in nature at the gene, individual, population, community, ecosystem and landscape scales and apply knowledge of ecological concepts to current environmental challenges.
Principles of Ecology, ENVS 280, TBA, ses, School of Environmental Sustainability, Dybzinski, Summer Session Early, LUREC, OFF
ENVS 286S: Principles of Ecology Lab Session: Early Instructor: Dybzinski LURECOFF
Course content includes lab skills and analytical techniques commonly employed in ecological studies; emphasizes sampling, research design, field work, laboratory technique, data analysis, project development, hypothesis testing, and scientific report writing. 
Principles of Ecology Lab, ENVS 286S, TBA, ses, School of Environmental Sustainability , Dybzinski, Summer Session Early, LUREC, OFF
ENVS 391: Environmental Research Session: A, B, C Instructor: TBA ONLINE
Students may register for independent research on a topic mutually acceptable to the student and any professor in the department. Usually this research is directed to a particular course or to the research of the professor. This class satisfies the Engaged Learning requirement in the Undergraduate Research category.
Environmental Research, ENVS 391, TBA, ses, School of Environmental Sustainability, TBA, Summer Session A, B, C, ONLINE
ENVS 391C: Independent Environmental Research (Capstone) Session: A, B, C Instructor: TBA ONLINE
Fulfills capstone requirement for IES majors. Through independent research experience, examine how scientific, sociological, economic and political knowledge and perspectives interact and define environmental problems and solutions/mitigation efforts. Research projects must use a multi-disciplinary perspective in analysis and interpretation. This class satisfies the Engaged Learning requirement in the Undergraduate Research category.
Independent Environmental Research (Capstone), ENVS 391C, TBA, ses, School of Environmental Sustainability, TBA, Summer Session A, B, C, ONLINE
ENVS 395: Environmental Internship Session: A, B, C Instructor: Various ONLINE
Students seek out and engage in a semester- or summer-long internship with a civic, business, governmental, or academic group providing hands-on experience in work on environmental issues. This class satisfies the Engaged Learning requirement in the Internship category.
Environmental Internship, ENVS 395, TBA, ses, School of Environmental Sustainability , Various, Summer Session A, B, C, ONLINE
ENVS 395C: Environmental Internship (Capstone) Session: A, B, C Instructor: Various ONLINE
Fulfills capstone requirement for IES majors. Through internship experience, students reflect upon academic and extra-curricular activities in their degree program and learn how scientific, sociological, economic and political knowledge and perspectives interact and define environmental problems and solutions/mitigation efforts.
Environmental Internship (Capstone), ENVS 395C, TBA, ses, School of Environmental Sustainability , Various, Summer Session A, B, C, ONLINE
ENVS 398 : Special Topics: Herpetology (LUREC) Session: Early Instructor: Mackey LURECOFF
Specific titles and contents vary from semester to semester.
Special Topics: Herpetology (LUREC), ENVS 398 , TBA, ses, Mackey, Summer Session Early, LUREC, OFF
ENVS 399: Directed Readings Session: A, B, C Instructor: Various LSC
Students will read, analyze, and discuss publications focusing on different aspects of a specific environmental issue or theme, and will demonstrate comprehension of, and the ability to apply information from, scientific literature and be able to synthesize information to produce a cogent, synthetic analysis of their topic based on these readings.
Directed Readings, ENVS 399, TBA, ses, School of Environmental Sustainability , Various, Summer Session A, B, C, LSC
FINC 301: Introductory Business Finance Session: A Instructor: Davidson ONLINE
The objective of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the general principles of business finance: capital investment, financing, capital structure, and related areas including the basics of valuation. Students will demonstrate basic knowledge of financial analysis, time value of money, financial decision making, the valuation of financial and physical assets, the risk-return tradeoff, capital budgeting, and dividend policy.
Introductory Business Finance, FINC 301, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Finance, Davidson, Summer Session A, ONLINE
FINC 334: Principles of Corporate Finance Session: A Instructor: Yamani ONLINE
This course provides students with a foundational and integrated knowledge of corporate finance. Topics include discounted cash flows, firm valuation, capital budgeting, principals of the risk and return relationship, market efficiency, capital structure, and financing. Students will will be asked to independently complete the Bloomberg Market Concepts (BMC) course. Students will demonstrate knowledge of valuation principles, raising funds for investment decisions, capital investment choices, risk and return relationship, capital markets and instruments, all in the context of real-world problems and situations
Principles of Corporate Finance, FINC 334, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Finance, Yamani, Summer Session A, ONLINE
FINC 335: Investments Session: B Instructor: Bergman ONLINE
This course is an introductory course of capital market theory, which includes the topics of risk and return analysis of stocks, bonds and cash equivalents; modern portfolio theory; bond pricing, the term structure of interest. Students will be able to demonstrate the analytical tools and finance theory necessary for making good investment decisions and for understanding the pricing of financial securities.
Investments, FINC 335, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Finance, Bergman, Summer Session B, ONLINE
FINC 337 : Banking, Money & Capital Markets Session: B Instructor: Bergman ONLINE
Introduction to financial markets and institutions and to the Federal Reserve and monetary policy. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of how financial markets and institutions work and are important to financial decision making, how interest rates and bond prices are determined and interrelated, why and how financial institutions are regulated by the government, and who the Federal Reserve is and how its actions affect the economy.
Banking, Money & Capital Markets, FINC 337 , Mon, Wed, quinlan, Business, Finance, Bergman, Summer Session B, ONLINE
FINC 346: Introduction to Options Session: B Instructor: Yamani WTC
This class offers a comprehensive introduction to options, including a detailed examination of option markets, option properties, trading strategies using options, binomial tree and Black-Scholes valuation models, and hedging strategies using options. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of option markets, option pricing models, and how options can be used to hedge risks.
Introduction to Options, FINC 346, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Finance, Yamani, Summer Session B, WTC
FNAR 113: Drawing I Session: B Instructor: Vera ONLINE
An introduction to the basic elements of drawing including: line, value, texture, volume, shape, proportion, perspective and visual composition. A variety of drawing materials will be explored with an emphasis on observation problems designed to build technical, perceptual, and personal expressive interpretation of form through the drawing idiom. . Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic drawing principles and vocabulary, through practice and articulation of both formal and artistic ideas.
Drawing I, FNAR 113, TBA, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, Vera, Summer Session B, ONLINE
FNAR 114: Painting I Session: B Instructor: Hunt LSC
An introduction to the basic elements of painting including: the application of drawing, design, and color principles. A variety of materials will be explored with an emphasis on oil painting. Observational problems will be introduced to build technical, perceptual, and personal expressive interpretation of form through the painting idiom. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic painting principles and vocabulary, through practice and articulation of both formal and artistic ideas.
Painting I, FNAR 114, Mon, Wed, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, Hunt, Summer Session B, LSC
FNAR 115: Foundations of Photography Session: A Instructor: Murray ONLINE
An introduction to the basic equipment, materials, processes, and philosophy of black and white photography. Students learn control of the camera and printing processes as well as the verbal skills necessary to understand and appreciate the nature of the medium and its function as a means of communication and fine art. A fully adjustable digital camera (DSLR) and an external hard drive are required.
Foundations of Photography, FNAR 115, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, Murray, Summer Session A, ONLINE
FNAR 199: Art and Visual Culture Session: A Instructor: Heer ONLINE
An introduction to the principles of art and their application to broader visual culture, this course explores the complex nature of art through an examination of its visual elements, techniques, functions, critical methodologies, and related social issues. The course takes advantage of Chicago's artistic resources.
Art and Visual Culture , FNAR 199, TBA, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, Heer, Summer Session A, ONLINE
FNAR 380 : Internship I Session: B Instructor: Evans ONLINE
Visual Communication majors complete an internship providing an opportunity to use their visual and technical skills in a professional setting. Outcome: Students work with others to develop and complete projects on a predetermined schedule; they get the opportunity to learn from professionals in the field; they find out how well they are doing as judged by the world outside the classroom.
Internship I, FNAR 380 , TBA, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, Evans, Summer Session B, ONLINE
FNAR 381: Internship II Session: B Instructor: Evans ONLINE
Visual Communication majors complete an internship providing an opportunity to use their visual and technical skills in a professional setting. Outcome: Students work with others to develop and complete projects on a predetermined schedule; they get the opportunity to learn from professionals in the field; they find out how well they are doing as judged by the world outside the classroom.
Internship II, FNAR 381, TBA, Fine & Performing Arts, Evans, Summer Session B, ONLINE
FREN 101: Elementary French I Session: A Instructor: Tall ONLINE
Taught in French, faculty member instructs basic communicative French, the people and cultures where it is spoken, using formal and informal registers, and speaking in present and future time. Students will listen and respond, read and write, ask and answer simple questions in basic functional French. The content will focus on personal topics and everyday living. At the end of the course, students will successfully interpret and express needs pertaining to home, work, college, leisure, and dining. Achievement level desired: Novice Low, American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL*) standards.
Elementary French I, FREN 101, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Tall, Summer Session A, ONLINE
FREN 102: Elementary French II Session: B Instructor: Angelo ONLINE
Taught in French, this course is a continuation of basic French inter-communication skills both producing French (speaking and writing), and interpreting French (listening and reading). The aim is to comprehend and contribute to discussions about families, housing, sports, travel, and traditions in French. At the end of the course, students will comprehend and speak in present, future, and past narrative; get and give simple direction; share personal information. Achievement level desired: ACTFL* Novice Low to Mid.
Elementary French II, FREN 102, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Angelo, Summer Session B, ONLINE
FRSC 390: Forensic Science Internship Session: B Instructor: Gruhl ONLINE
The purpose of this course is to enhance the student's development and learning through observational and participatory experience in forensic focused criminal justice agencies. Students will be able to contribute in a meaningful way to the operation of a specific forensic focused criminal justice agency and be able to identify and describe the link between their field experience and prior courses.
Forensic Science Internship, FRSC 390, TBA, cas, Forensic Science, Gruhl, Summer Session B, ONLINE
GERM 369: German Reading Knowledge Session: A Instructor: Andress ONLINE
This course provides graduate students in the humanities, arts, and social sciences with the fundamentals of German grammar for the purposes of reading and translating academic German. During the first five weeks of the course, we will work through German grammar explanations, vocabulary, strategies for negotiating meaning and translation exercises.
German Reading Knowledge, GERM 369, Mon, Thurs, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Andress, Summer Session A, ONLINE
GLST 301 : Capstone in Global Studies Session: A Instructor: Pintchman ONLINE
This course focuses on an important global issue or set of issues relevant to the concerns of the Global Studies program. Students who choose to take the capstone course will normally complete a very substantial research project that they work on over the entire semester. Students will improve their research and writing skills and will acquire an in-depth knowledge of an issue critical to a comprehensive understanding of the interdisciplinary field of global studies.
Capstone in Global Studies, GLST 301 , TBA, cas, Global Studies, Pintchman, Summer Session A, ONLINE
GLST 370: Global Studies Internship Session: C Instructor: Hasselmann ONLINE
Students enrolled in this course must secure an internship relevant to the field of global studies. Students not only engage in regular workplace activities but also attend class meetings, complete writing assignments reflecting on their internship placements, write a final paper, and submit a final evaluation from their workplace supervisor. Students will obtain practical experience in a professional work setting relevant to their future career paths and will engage in academic reflection on that experience.
Global Studies Internship, GLST 370, TBA, cas, Global Studies, Hasselmann, Summer Session C, ONLINE
HIST 102: Evolution of Western Ideas & Institutions since 17th C. Session: A Instructor: Dennis ONLINE
This course traces the development of western civilization and its global impact since the 17th century to the present. Students will gain an understanding of history as a discipline, developing critical thinking skills based on historical knowledge about key people, places and events that shaped the modern world.
Evolution of Western Ideas & Institutions since 17th C., HIST 102, TBA, cas, History, Dennis, Summer Session A, ONLINE
HIST 102: Evolution of Western Ideas & Institutions since 17th C. Session: B Instructor: TBA ONLINE
This course traces the development of western civilization and its global impact since the 17th century to the present. Students will gain an understanding of history as a discipline, developing critical thinking skills based on historical knowledge about key people, places and events that shaped the modern world.
Evolution of Western Ideas & Institutions since 17th C., HIST 102, TBA, cas, History, TBA, Summer Session B, ONLINE
HIST 102: Evolution of Western Ideas & Institutions since 17th C. Session: A Instructor: Suszko LSC
This course traces the development of western civilization and its global impact since the 17th century to the present. Students will gain an understanding of history as a discipline, developing critical thinking skills based on historical knowledge about key people, places and events that shaped the modern world.
Evolution of Western Ideas & Institutions since 17th C., HIST 102, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, History; Core, Writing Intensive, Suszko, Summer Session A, LSC
HIST 103: American Pluralism Session: B Instructor: TBA ONLINE
This course is an introduction to history as a discipline, and an analysis of the origins, development and structure of the United States as a pluralistic and multiracial society from 1609 to the present. Students will be able to demonstrate historical knowledge, draw links between the American experience and national identities, and to develop critical thinking and communication skills.
American Pluralism, HIST 103, TBA, cas, History, TBA, Summer Session B, ONLINE
HIST 104: Global History since 1500 Session: A Instructor: Khodarkovsky ONLINE
This course deals with the emergence of the modern world, and can focus on such topics as the expansion and intensification of cross-cultural interaction (imperialism, colonialism, and nationalism); the spread of information (capitalism, industrialism, and popular sovereignty); race and ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic status. Students will be able to evaluate and explain the forces of historical continuity and change; demonstrate how the encounters/changes between and among societies produced the world we have today; analyze and discuss the significance of primary and secondary sources and how they relate to the history under discussion.
Global History since 1500, HIST 104, TBA, cas, History, Khodarkovsky, Summer Session A, ONLINE
HIST 209: Survey of Islamic History Session: A Instructor: Searcy ONLINE
The course will introduce the historical development of Islamic civilization and the formation of Muslim social and political institutions from the 7th century to the present. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the historical development and diversity of Islamic beliefs, practices, and institutions in varied regional contexts and historical periods.
Survey of Islamic History, HIST 209, TBA, cas, History, Searcy, Summer Session A, ONLINE
HIST 209 : Survey of Islamic History Session: B Instructor: TBA ONLINE
The course will introduce the historical development of Islamic civilization and the formation of Muslim social and political institutions from the 7th century to the present. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the historical development and diversity of Islamic beliefs, practices, and institutions in varied regional contexts and historical periods.
Survey of Islamic History, HIST 209 , TBA, cas, History, TBA, Summer Session B, ONLINE
HIST 211 : United States to 1865 Session: B Instructor: TBA ONLINE
This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the colonial era through the Civil War. Students will demonstrate an understanding of Native American societies, the impact of European colonization, the creation and evolution of democratic institutions in a multicultural society, the geographic expansion of the United States, and the impact of slavery.
United States to 1865, HIST 211 , TBA, cas, History, TBA, Summer Session B, ONLINE
HIST 212: American History since 1865 Session: A Instructor: O'Connor ONLINE
This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the Civil War to the present. Students will demonstrate an understanding of how the United States became a modern industrial society, the emergence and evolution of the modern welfare state, the rise of the United States as a global power, and the impact of controversies over civil rights and liberties on American society.
American History since 1865, HIST 212, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, History, O'Connor, Summer Session A, ONLINE
HIST 212: American History since 1865 Session: B Instructor: Garneau LSC
This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the Civil War to the present. Students will demonstrate an understanding of how the United States became a modern industrial society, the emergence and evolution of the modern welfare state, the rise of the United States as a global power, and the impact of controversies over civil rights and liberties on American society.
American History since 1865, HIST 212, TBA, cas, scps, School of Continuing and Professional Studies, Garneau, Summer Session B, LSC
HIST 212: American History since 1865 Session: A Instructor: Clay ONLINE
This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the Civil War to the present. Students will demonstrate an understanding of how the United States became a modern industrial society, the emergence and evolution of the modern welfare state, the rise of the United States as a global power, and the impact of controversies over civil rights and liberties on American society.
American History since 1865 , HIST 212, TBA, cas, History, Clay, Summer Session A, ONLINE
HIST 212: American History since 1865 Session: B Instructor: Wilson ONLINE
This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the Civil War to the present. Students will demonstrate an understanding of how the United States became a modern industrial society, the emergence and evolution of the modern welfare state, the rise of the United States as a global power, and the impact of controversies over civil rights and liberties on American society.
American History since 1865, HIST 212, Tue, Thurs, cas, History, Wilson, Summer Session B, ONLINE
HIST 398: History Internship Session: A, B Instructor: Mooney-Melvin LSC
Students can find more information about internships through the Department of History: www.luc.edu/history. Internships allow students to earn three course credits while gaining valuable professional experience in public and private institutions engaged in history-related projects. Internship possibilities include historical associations and societies; oral history projects; museums and halls of fame; entrepreneurial history firms; genealogical services; preservation agencies; and archives and libraries. Interns work for a minimum of five hours per week in an internship position jointly agreed upon by the student and the internship director. Interns are also required to attend seminar meetings, keep a weekly journal, and write a paper related to the internship experience. This course fulfills the Civic Engagement and Leadership Values requirement of the core curriculum.
History Internship, HIST 398, TBA, cas, History, Mooney-Melvin, Summer Session A, B, LSC
HIST 399: Directed Study Session: A, B Instructor: O'Connor (A)/TBA (B) LSC
This course provides students with the opportunity to work under the direction of a faculty member on a particular area of interest that is not part of the department’s usual curriculum. Students will gain an understanding of a specific area of history through the close reading of selected texts and the preparation of a research paper.
Directed Study, HIST 399, TBA, cas, History, O'Connor (A)/TBA (B), Summer Session A, B, LSC
ISSCM 241: ISSCM 241 - Business Statistics Session: A Instructor: Kaplan ONLINE
This course examines the steps and procedures required to solve problems in science, social science, and business where data are useful - from the definition of the managerial problems to the use of statistical analysis to address these problems.
ISSCM 241 - Business Statistics, ISSCM 241, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Information Systems and Supply Chain Management, Kaplan, Summer Session A, ONLINE
ISSCM 393: Requirements and Analysis and Communication Session: A Instructor: Hoffman ONLINE
This course focuses on Information Systems requirements and related communication skills. Students will learn how to gather requirements for Information Systems from an organization¿s users and executives based on a general understanding of organizations and business goals. Students learn techniques of how to translate between organizational needs and requirements for systems and processes, and how to analyze, validate, and prioritize those requirements. A special focus of the course will be to improve business communication skills such as interviewing, listening, presenting and negotiating.
Requirements and Analysis and Communication, ISSCM 393, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Information Systems and Supply Chain Management, Hoffman, Summer Session A, ONLINE
ITAL 101: Italian I Session: A Instructor: Spilioti LSC
This course provides an introduction to the basic grammatical elements of Italian, promoting the development of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills while examining the geography and culture of Italy. Students will be able to understand and write basic Italian sentences and to produce orally and in writing short sentences providing basic personal information about themselves, their activities and plans in Italian.
Italian I, ITAL 101, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Spilioti, Summer Session A, LSC
ITAL 102: Italian II Session: B Instructor: Defraia ONLINE
This course continues the introduction to the basic grammatical elements of Italian, promoting the further development of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing skills while examining the geography and culture of Italy. Students will be able to understand and write basic Italian sentences and to produce orally and in writing short sentences providing basic personal information about themselves, their activities and plans in Italian.
Italian II , ITAL 102, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Defraia, Summer Session B, ONLINE
LITR 245-WI: Asian Masterpieces Session: B Instructor: Trowbridge ONLINE
This course will study masterpieces of Asian literature in a variety of literary genres in their cultural context. Students will gain a significant understanding of how Asian literary works reflect their Asian cultural context.
Asian Masterpieces, LITR 245-WI, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Trowbridge, Summer Session B, ONLINE
LITR 264: Italian Film Genre Session: A Instructor: Lombardi-Diop ONLINE
This course will feature celebrated films of the Italian comic tradition from the age of "commedia all'italiana" in the 1950's to the present. Students will learn to understand and appreciate Italian comic films and gain insights into the Italian national character.
Italian Film Genre, LITR 264, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Lombardi-Diop, Summer Session A, ONLINE
LITR 268R: Italian Culture: Food & Wine Session: Early Instructor: Simari LSC
The course deals with the history of Italian cuisine and wines through centuries up to present day. It outlines the development and change of taste, how it has been affected and defined by historical events. A dynamic pattern of society is thus given by the intersections among history, culture, food and wines. The course will also offer on-site classes and guest speakers. Students will demonstrate an historical appreciation of the change in eating and drinking habits in modern Italy, and a knowledge of Italy's move towards a more ethnic and global taste.
Italian Culture: Food & Wine, LITR 268R, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Simari, Summer Session Early, LSC
LREB 315 : Law and the Regulatory Environment of Business I Session: B Instructor: Berg ONLINE
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the American legal system. Intended primarily for students who have not previously studied law, the course includes a review of the concept of law, the function of the courts, and the dual judicial system of the United States. An appreciation of legal history and the operation of law are developed through the vehicle of a detailed analysis of contract law and a survey of other topical headings. The students should achieve an awareness of the necessity of voluntary compliance with general legal concepts in order for society to enable all persons to live together in harmony. An understanding of the court system as a substitute for self-help is deemed essential and knowledge of binding contract law is fostered as a basis for all agreements.
Law and the Regulatory Environment of Business I, LREB 315 , Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Berg, Summer Session B, ONLINE
LREB 315: Law and the Regulatory Environment of Business I Session: A Instructor: Stachnik WTC
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the American legal system. Intended primarily for students who have not previously studied law, the course includes a review of the concept of law, the function of the courts, and the dual judicial system of the United States. An appreciation of legal history and the operation of law are developed through the vehicle of a detailed analysis of contract law and a survey of other topical headings. The students should achieve an awareness of the necessity of voluntary compliance with general legal concepts in order for society to enable all persons to live together in harmony. An understanding of the court system as a substitute for self-help is deemed essential and knowledge of binding contract law is fostered as a basis for all agreements.
Law and the Regulatory Environment of Business I , LREB 315, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Accounting and Business Law, Stachnik, Summer Session A, WTC
MARK 201: Principles of Marketing Session: B Instructor: Sredl ONLINE
This course develops an understanding of the marketing systems by which organizations plan, price, promote and distribute products and services to selected target markets. Students analyze market conditions and apply the basic tools to develop marketing strategies to successfully meet the customers' needs resulting in a viable, profitable organization.
Principles of Marketing, MARK 201, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Marketing, Sredl, Summer Session B, ONLINE
MARK 360: Retailing Management Session: B Instructor: Hasty ONLINE
This course develops an understanding of retailing and the role that retailing plays in the marketing system and in marketing strategies. Students analyze and develop retail strategies that fit and support overall marketing strategies.
Retailing Management, MARK 360, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Marketing, Hasty, Summer Session B, ONLINE
MATH 117: Precalculus I Session: A Instructor: Houlihan ONLINE
This course covers algebraic topics ranging from functions and their applications to complex numbers to inverse functions to the fundamental theorem of algebra. Students who plan to study calculus will obtain the algebraic background needed to enroll in precalculus.
Precalculus I, MATH 117, Tue, Thurs, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Houlihan, Summer Session A, ONLINE
MATH 117: Precalculus I Session: B Instructor: Varghese ONLINE
This course covers algebraic topics ranging from functions and their applications to complex numbers to inverse functions to the fundamental theorem of algebra. Students who plan to study calculus will obtain the algebraic background needed to enroll in precalculus.
Precalculus I, MATH 117, Mon, Wed, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Varghese, Summer Session B, ONLINE
MATH 118: Precalculus II Session: A Instructor: Law LSC
This course covers topics ranging from exponential and logarithmic functions to trigonometric functions to the complex plane and elementary optimization problems. Students will obtain the background needed to enroll in either of the departments calculus sequences.
Precalculus II, MATH 118, Mon, Wed, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Law, Summer Session A, LSC
MATH 118: Precalculus II Session: B Instructor: Podolny ONLINE
Functions and change with an emphasis on linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their graphs. Specific geometric topics include concavity and how transformations affect graphs. Topics in trigonometry include radians, sinusoidal functions, identities, sum/difference formulas, double/half angle formulas and trigonometric equations. Other topics include polar coordinates.
Precalculus II, MATH 118, Tue, Thurs, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Podolny, Summer Session B, ONLINE
MATH 118: Precalculus II Session: A Instructor: Rohn ONLINE
Functions and change with an emphasis on linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their graphs. Specific geometric topics include concavity and how transformations affect graphs. Topics in trigonometry include radians, sinusoidal functions, identities, sum/difference formulas, double/half angle formulas and trigonometric equations. Other topics include polar coordinates.
Precalculus II, MATH 118, Mon, Wed, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Rohn, Summer Session A, ONLINE
MATH 131: Applied Calculus I Session: A Instructor: Eze ONLINE
This course is an introduction to differential and integral calculus, with an emphasis on applications. This course is intended for students in the life and social sciences, computer science, and business. Topics include: modeling change using functions including exponential and trigonometric functions, the concept of the derivative, computing the derivative, applications of the derivative to business and life, social and computer sciences, and an introduction to integration. Students will obtain an understanding of calculus and methods for applying calculus (especially differential calculus), including modeling/analyzing processes (such as population growth and cooling), interpreting the derivative (numerical, graphical, and algebraic), and optimization (such as finding the time and level for a peak drug concentration).
Applied Calculus I, MATH 131, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Eze, Summer Session A, ONLINE
MATH 131: Applied Calculus I Session: B Instructor: Del Greco ONLINE
This course is an introduction to differential and integral calculus, with an emphasis on applications. This course is intended for students in the life and social sciences, computer science, and business. Topics include: modeling change using functions including exponential and trigonometric functions, the concept of the derivative, computing the derivative, applications of the derivative to business and life, social and computer sciences, and an introduction to integration. Students will obtain an understanding of calculus and methods for applying calculus (especially differential calculus), including modeling/analyzing processes (such as population growth and cooling), interpreting the derivative (numerical, graphical, and algebraic), and optimization (such as finding the time and level for a peak drug concentration).
Applied Calculus I, MATH 131, Tue, Thurs, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Del Greco, Summer Session B, ONLINE
MATH 131: Applied Calculus I Session: B Instructor: Houlihan LSC
This course is an introduction to differential and integral calculus, with an emphasis on applications. This course is intended for students in the life and social sciences, computer science, and business. Topics include: modeling change using functions including exponential and trigonometric functions, the concept of the derivative, computing the derivative, applications of the derivative to business and life, social and computer sciences, and an introduction to integration. Students will obtain an understanding of calculus and methods for applying calculus (especially differential calculus), including modeling/analyzing processes (such as population growth and cooling), interpreting the derivative (numerical, graphical, and algebraic), and optimization (such as finding the time and level for a peak drug concentration).
Applied Calculus I, MATH 131, Mon, Wed, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Houlihan, Summer Session B, LSC
MATH 132: Applied Calculus II Session: B Instructor: Mills ONLINE
This course is a continuation of Mathematics 131. Topics include: definition and interpretations of the integral (numerically, graphically, and algebraically), basic techniques for computing anti-derivatives, applications to probability, an introduction to multi-variable calculus and optimization for functions of several variables, and mathematical modeling using differential equations. (This course is not a substitute for MATH 162.) Students will obtain an understanding of integral and multi-variable calculus, including modeling/analyzing processes with the integral, optimization of functions of several variables, and modeling with differential equations.
Applied Calculus II, MATH 132, Mon, Wed, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Mills, Summer Session B, ONLINE
MATH 132: Applied Calculus II Session: A Instructor: Bourque ONLINE
This course is a continuation of Mathematics 131. Topics include: definition and interpretations of the integral (numerically, graphically, and algebraically), basic techniques for computing anti-derivatives, applications to probability, an introduction to multi-variable calculus and optimization for functions of several variables, and mathematical modeling using differential equations. (This course is not a substitute for MATH 162.) Students will obtain an understanding of integral and multi-variable calculus, including modeling/analyzing processes with the integral, optimization of functions of several variables, and modeling with differential equations.
Applied Calculus II, MATH 132, Mon, Wed, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Bourque, Summer Session A, ONLINE
MATH 161: Calculus I Session: A Instructor: Radulescu LSC
A traditional introduction to differential and integral calculus. Functions, limits, continuity, differentiation, intermediate and mean-value theorems, curve sketching, optimization problems, related rates, definite and indefinite integrals, fundamental theorem of calculus, logarithmic and exponential functions. Applications to physics and other disciplines.
Calculus I, MATH 161, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Radulescu, Summer Session A, LSC
MATH 162: Calculus II Session: B Instructor: London ONLINE
A continuation of Math 161. Calculus of logarithmic, exponential, inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic functions. Techniques of integration. Applications of integration to volume, surface area, arc length, center of mass and work. Numerical sequences and series. Study of power series and the theory of convergence. Study of Taylor's theorem with remainder.
Calculus II, MATH 162, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, London, Summer Session B, ONLINE
MATH 398: Independent Study in Mathematics Session: A, B Instructor: Perry ONLINE
This course allows students to engage in independent study on selected topics in mathematics under the supervision of a faculty member. Students will obtain an understanding of an advanced topic in their major.
Independent Study in Mathematics, MATH 398, TBA, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Perry, Summer Session A, B, ONLINE
MGMT 201: Managing People and Organizations Session: A Instructor: Binkley ONLINE
This course introduces students to the dynamics of human behavior in the workplace through the study of such topics as perception, learning, motivation, leadership and group behavior. Students will learn principles of interpersonal influence, conflict resolution, and effective group behavior and develop an awareness of ethical issues in the workplace and organizational social responsibility.
Managing People and Organizations, MGMT 201, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Management, Binkley, Summer Session A, ONLINE
MGMT 304: Strategic Management Session: A Instructor: Kravitt ONLINE
This is a capstone course that analyzes the responsibilities of general management in formulating, communicating and implementing a strategic plan. Through case studies, the course applies the principles of strategic analysis to business situations so as to integrate all of the core courses in the undergraduate business program. Students will develop executive and general management skills through an understanding of how the various functions of an organization operate as a whole. Students will also build their skills in conducting strategic analyses in a variety of industries and competitive situations and gain a stronger understanding of the competitive challenges of the market environment.
Strategic Management, MGMT 304, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Management, Kravitt, Summer Session A, ONLINE
MGMT 304: Strategic Management Session: B Instructor: Kravitt ONLINE
This is a capstone course that analyzes the responsibilities of general management in formulating, communicating and implementing a strategic plan. Through case studies, the course applies the principles of strategic analysis to business situations so as to integrate all of the core courses in the undergraduate business program. Students will develop executive and general management skills through an understanding of how the various functions of an organization operate as a whole. Students will also build their skills in conducting strategic analyses in a variety of industries and competitive situations and gain a stronger understanding of the competitive challenges of the market environment.
Strategic Management, MGMT 304, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Management, Kravitt, Summer Session B, ONLINE
MGMT 320: Leading and Managing Teams Session: A Instructor: Young Jae Yoon ONLINE
This course examines the characteristics of effective teams and team players in an organizational context and covers theories and concepts of team composition, roles and leadership, decision making, team charters, conflict management, team networks and international teams. Students will gain an understanding of team processes and team performance in organizations, learn tools that make teams effective, develop team skills and practice creating, monitoring and improving an ongoing team effort.
Leading and Managing Teams, MGMT 320, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Management, Young Jae Yoon, Summer Session A, ONLINE
MGMT 341: Ethics in Business Session: A Instructor: Smaligo ONLINE
This course focuses on ethical issues in the world of business and commerce and addresses a number of interrelated questions. These questions include: What are the rights and obligations of business in society? Can businesses "do good" and "do well"? Are business ethics a viable goal or an unachievable ideal?
Ethics in Business, MGMT 341, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Management, Smaligo, Summer Session A, ONLINE
MGMT 341: Ethics in Business Session: B Instructor: Pepe ONLINE
This course focuses on ethical issues in the world of business and commerce and addresses a number of interrelated questions. These questions include: What are the rights and obligations of business in society? Can businesses "do good" and "do well"? Are business ethics a viable goal or an unachievable ideal?
Ethics in Business, MGMT 341, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Management, Pepe, Summer Session B, ONLINE
MPBH 495-003 / HSM 355-002: Health Care Essentials for Crisis Preparedness and Management MPBH Class #1957 HSM Class #1966 Session: A Instructor: Stys ONLINE
The ability to respond nimbly to an emerging situation is a critical competency for any healthcare leader. Effective leaders have a process to evaluate how a crisis impacts all aspects of an organization – from revising daily operations, to ongoing reputation management, all the way through a return to normal day-to-day business. In this course, students will participate in activities to develop skills to analyze the larger situation and discern how external factors may influence the ability of their organization to remain viable. Using the format of an extended “table-top disaster drill,” students will learn the project management skills (e.g., incorporating risk mitigation, strategic planning, communication, organizational decision-making, and general operational management) required to succeed in an emergency situation. Objectives • Identify resources to support activities during a healthcare crisis • Discuss the operational competencies required to shift successfully between routine and levels of emergency operations management • Engage in a scenario-planning exercise to foster critical thinking skills for a fluid situation Instructor: Dr. Stys has taught ethics at Loyola since 2004 when he was one of the vowed Jesuits on campus. After many years as a Jesuit, Dr. Stys is now married with two elementary school-age boys. Much of his career outside academia has been creating quality and performance improvement within Federally Qualified Health Centers and hospice and palliative care companies. He considers himself a strong non-profit executive leader who loves to mentor students passionate about working for healthcare justice. How to enroll: • Current students: Open to Loyola students from all programs and levels of study. Register online through LOCUS
Health Care Essentials for Crisis Preparedness and Management MPBH Class #1957 HSM Class #1966, MPBH 495-003 / HSM 355-002, Thurs, parkinson, Public Health/Health Care Administration, Stys, Summer Session A, ONLINE
MPBH 495-004 / HSM 355-004: Ethical, Legal and Political Lessons as We Move Towards the End of the COVID-19 Pandemic MPBH Class #2583 HSM Class #2584 Session: B Instructor: Swartzman ONLINE
In coming out of a public health crisis and looking towards the future, leaders and public policy makers must confront the ethical and legal implications of actions and in-actions including impacts on population health, economic vitality, and the social and political will to follow emergency policies. This course will explore current and emerging U.S. policy decisions arising in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Discussion will focus on important legal, ethical and policy decisions that will need to be made. We will explore lessons learned to date and implications for moving forward. Objectives • Identify the domains of public health ethics and legal framework affecting public health policies in the U.S. • Analyze legal and ethical issues that arise in protecting population health during a pandemic in a democracy with divided government • Identify frameworks to assist decision makers when evaluating future health policies affecting management of the COVID-19 pandemic Instructor Dr. Swartzman is a lawyer and public health expert with over 40 years’ experience teaching public health law, ethics, and policy. How to enroll: • Current students: Open to Loyola students from all programs and levels of study. Register online through LOCUS
Ethical, Legal and Political Lessons as We Move Towards the End of the COVID-19 Pandemic MPBH Class #2583 HSM Class #2584, MPBH 495-004 / HSM 355-004, Wed, parkinson, Public Health, Health Care Administration, Swartzman, Summer Session B, ONLINE
MPBH 495-007 / HSM 355-003: Mosquitos and Ticks: Why can’t we just get rid of them? MPBH Class #2776 HSM Class #2777 Session: A Instructor: Harbison ONLINE
Course Description This course will provide an overview of the current public health measures to minimize diseases of mosquitoes and ticks and help answer the question, ‘Why can’t we just get rid of them?’ Objectives 1. Explain the basics of the biology of ecology of mosquito and tick vectors 2. Apply the knowledge of mosquito and tick biology and ecology to vector monitoring 3. Apply the knowledge of mosquito and tick biology and ecology to vector control measures 4. Choose appropriate measures to assess the effectiveness of vector control measures Instructor Harbison has spent almost two decades working collaboratively in the field of vector control and surveillance. The focus of his research and work has been assessing the effectiveness of our methods to monitor and minimize the disease risk of mosquitoes and ticks. How to enroll: • Current students: Open to Loyola students from all programs and levels of study. Register online through LOCUS
Mosquitos and Ticks: Why can’t we just get rid of them? MPBH Class #2776 HSM Class #2777 , MPBH 495-007 / HSM 355-003, Tue, parkinson, Public Health, Health Care Administration, Harbison, Summer Session A, ONLINE
MPBH 495-008 / HSM 355-005: Syndemics: Intersectionality of Infectious Disease, Non communicable diseases and Social Determinants of Health MPBH Class #2187 HSM Class #1967 Session: A Instructor: Dugas and Mora ONLINE
The goal of this mini-course is to examine how the relationship between infectious communicable diseases and non-communicable diseases has evolved over time, using the syndemic framework. The concept behind a syndemic is that there are dynamic relationships and synergies among clusters of two or more coexisting epidemics, such as Covid19 and diabetes, along with various factors that precipitate their interaction within a population. The syndemic is thus the outcome of the coexistence two epidemics and the social and structural factors in which they exist. Understanding and tackling syndemics require the recognition that diseases rarely exist in isolation and the identification of the social, political, economic, and ecological factors that are driving poor health. This course will examine syndemics as the intersection of infectious diseases, NCDs and the social determinants around them, illustrating concepts with case studies. Objectives 1. Describe how CD and NCD correlate in some settings. 2. Identify social determinants of health and the impact they have in NCD and CD. 3. Recognize existing syndemics and its root causes. Instructors Dr. Dugas and Mora research and practice focus is on social determinants of health affecting chronic preventable diseases (obesity and diabetes) and infectious diseases (HIV and hepatitis C) in the U.S. and sub-Saharan Africa. How to enroll: • Current students: Open to Loyola students from all programs and levels of study. Register online through LOCUS
Syndemics: Intersectionality of Infectious Disease, Non communicable diseases and Social Determinants of Health MPBH Class #2187 HSM Class #1967, MPBH 495-008 / HSM 355-005, Wed, parkinson, Public Health, Health Care Administration, Dugas and Mora, Summer Session A, ONLINE
MPBH 495-009/HSM 355-009: BE THE CHANGE: Using implementation science to improve health outcomes Session: A Instructor: Weaver ONLINE
MPBH Class # 2778 HSM Class # 2779 Course Description: The goal of this mini-course is to introduce students to implementation science. Implementation science is the study of how we take evidence created from good quality research and get these findings used in practice. It involves changing behaviors and processes to incorporate interventions, programs and policies into ongoing practice. While this course will focus primarily on health care, implementation science can apply a various of areas including education, public health, social work, and industry. During this course we will discuss why implementation science is needed, some of the key theories and frameworks related to implementation science, engagement of key stakeholders and community in the process, the importance of identifying barriers and facilitators to change, and how to sustain and spread change. Objectives • To introduce the field of implementation science to students, faculty, providers and community members. • To demonstrate how implementation science can improve equity in health care. • To stimulate students to consider how to take high quality, effective research findings and incorporate these findings into daily practice. Instructor Dr. Fran Weaver is a health services researcher and Professor in the Parkinson’s School of Health Services and Public Health and at the Hines VA Hospital. Her research in Health Outcomes, program evaluation and implementation science has spanned more than 3 decades. How to enroll: • Current students: Open to Loyola students from all programs and levels of study. Register online through LOCUS
BE THE CHANGE: Using implementation science to improve health outcomes, MPBH 495-009/HSM 355-009, Tue, parkinson, Parkinson School Summer Short Courses 2022 , Weaver, Summer Session A, ONLINE
MUSC 101: Art of Listening Session: A Instructor: Lowe ONLINE
Focus is on the acquisition and enhancement of listening skills through direct experience of musical works along with an examination of cross-cultural similarities and differences among musical styles. Concert attendance is required.
Art of Listening, MUSC 101, TBA, cas, Fine & Performing Arts; Music, Lowe, Summer Session A, ONLINE
MUSC 101: Art of Listening Session: B Instructor: Georg ONLINE
Focus is on the acquisition and enhancement of listening skills through direct experience of musical works along with an examination of cross-cultural similarities and differences among musical styles. Concert attendance is required. A cultivation of musical perception through a process of repeated and guided listenings; strengthening of listening skills while developing and expanding styles perspectives.
Art of Listening, MUSC 101, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Fine & Performing Arts; Music, Georg, Summer Session B, ONLINE
MUSC 102: Beginning Class Piano Session: B Instructor: Hwang ONLINE
For the student who has never had keyboard instruction and is interested in learning the art of performance on the piano. Fundamentals of music theory, note reading and personal enjoyment are emphasized. Strongly recommended for those preparing to teach music in elementary school. Students will learn a basic keyboard ability with an emphasis on reading music symbols accurately while also enjoying the making and doing of music.
Beginning Class Piano, MUSC 102, Mon, Wed, cas, Fine & Performing Arts; Music, Hwang, Summer Session B, ONLINE
MUSC 142 : Class Voice for Beginners Session: A Instructor: Hedegaard LSC
For the student who has never had voice instruction and is interested in learning the art of vocal performance. Fundamentals of music theory, note reading and personal enjoyment are emphasized. Strongly recommended for those preparing to teach in elementary school. Students will learn a basic vocal ability with an emphasis on reading music symbols accurately while also enjoying the making and doing of music.
Class Voice for Beginners, MUSC 142 , Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Fine & Performing Arts: Music, Hedegaard, Summer Session A, LSC
MUSC 394: Internship in Music Session: A, B Instructor: Lowe LSC
Music students complete a semester long internship providing an opportunity to use their technical, research or organizations skills in a professional setting. Students must complete and reflect upon 50 hours of internship experience per credit hour that is pre-approved by the Department of Fine and Performing Arts. Students gain professional experience working at a music organization while reflecting on their work experience and applying theories and techniques acquired from their music cources.
Internship in Music, MUSC 394, TBA, cas, Fine & Performing Art; Music, Lowe, Summer Session A, B, LSC
MUSC 399 : Independent Study Session: A, B Instructor: Lowe LSC
Independent study projects may be of various kinds and in any recognized area of the theatre arts. Such projects should be done under the close supervision of a music faculty member. Specific out comes and credit hours assigned to be determined by the student in consultation with the chairperson and theatre faculty supervisor.
Independent Study, MUSC 399 , TBA, cas, Fine & Performing Arts; Music, Lowe, Summer Session A, B, LSC
NEUR 101: Introduction to Neuroscience Session: A Instructor: Steidl LSC
This course will introduce students to basic concepts and the variety of topics in the field of neuroscience, including neuroanatomy (gross and cellular), physiology, neural basis of behavior, malfunctions due to disease and injury, and methods used to study these areas; laying a foundation for advanced coursework in neuroscience. At the end of the course, students will have knowledge of the organization of the nervous system, cellular events that underlie emotions, learning, and behavior, and awareness of classical and modern methods for advancing the field.
Introduction to Neuroscience, NEUR 101, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Psychology, Biology, Neuroscience, Steidl, Summer Session A, LSC
PHIL 130: Philosophy and Persons Session: A Instructor: Hoppe ONLINE
The course examines the way philosophy looks for fundamental characteristics that identify life as a properly human life, asks about its ultimate meaning or purpose, and raises questions about what counts as a good life. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the various approaches of the philosophical question of what it means to be human.
Philosophy and Persons, PHIL 130, Mon, cas, Philosophy, Hoppe, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PHIL 130: Philosophy and Persons Session: B Instructor: Derdak ONLINE
The course examines the way philosophy looks for fundamental characteristics that identify life as a properly human life, asks about its ultimate meaning or purpose, and raises questions about what counts as a good life. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the various approaches of the philosophical question of what it means to be human.
Philosophy and Persons, PHIL 130, TBA, cas, Philosophy, Derdak, Summer Session B, ONLINE
PHIL 130: Philosophy and Persons Session: B Instructor: MMousavian ONLINE
The course examines the way philosophy looks for fundamental characteristics that identify life as a properly human life, asks about its ultimate meaning or purpose, and raises questions about what counts as a good life. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the various approaches of the philosophical question of what it means to be human.
Philosophy and Persons, PHIL 130, TBA, cas, Philosophy, MMousavian, Summer Session B, ONLINE
PHIL 181 : Ethics Session: A Instructor: TBA ONLINE
This course examines ethical norms for conduct (e.g., theories of right and wrong action, of justice and of human rights) and ethical norms for judging the goodness or badness of persons and their lives. Special attention will be given to criteria for choosing between conflicting ethical theories, moral disagreement, the justification of moral judgments, and the application of ethical standards to practical decision-making and ethical questions that arise in everyday life. At the end of the course students are able to demonstrate understanding of criteria for choosing between conflicting ethical theories, moral disagreement, the justification of moral judgments, and the application of ethical standards to practical decision-making and ethical questions that arise in everyday life.
Ethics, PHIL 181 , TBA, cas, Philosophy, TBA, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PHIL 181: Ethics Session: B Instructor: Ott ONLINE
This course examines ethical norms for conduct (e.g., theories of right and wrong action, of justice and of human rights) and ethical norms for judging the goodness or badness of persons and their lives. Special attention will be given to criteria for choosing between conflicting ethical theories, moral disagreement, the justification of moral judgments, and the application of ethical standards to practical decision-making and ethical questions that arise in everyday life. At the end of the course students are able to demonstrate understanding of criteria for choosing between conflicting ethical theories, moral disagreement, the justification of moral judgments, and the application of ethical standards to practical decision-making and ethical questions that arise in everyday life.
Ethics, PHIL 181, TBA, cas, Philosophy, Ott, Summer Session B, ONLINE
PHIL 181: Ethics Session: A Instructor: Parks ONLINE
This course examines ethical norms for conduct (e.g., theories of right and wrong action, of justice and of human rights) and ethical norms for judging the goodness or badness of persons and their lives. Special attention will be given to criteria for choosing between conflicting ethical theories, moral disagreement, the justification of moral judgments, and the application of ethical standards to practical decision-making and ethical questions that arise in everyday life. At the end of the course students are able to demonstrate understanding of criteria for choosing between conflicting ethical theories, moral disagreement, the justification of moral judgments, and the application of ethical standards to practical decision-making and ethical questions that arise in everyday life.
Ethics, PHIL 181, TBA, cas, Philosophy, Parks, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PHIL 182 : Social and Political Philosophy Session: A Instructor: Smith ONLINE
This course will investigate one of the central questions of philosophy and social theory: how we, as human beings, should live together. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the major philosophical questions in the area of social philosophy with attention to the historical and conceptual development of these questions, and be able to articulate some of the major problems and responses central to this area of philosophy. This is a Writing Intensive section.
Social and Political Philosophy, PHIL 182 , TBA, cas, Philosophy, Smith, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PHIL 182: Social and Political Philosophy Session: A Instructor: Grob ONLINE
This course will investigate one of the central questions of philosophy and social theory: how we, as human beings, should live together. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the major philosophical questions in the area of social philosophy with attention to the historical and conceptual development of these questions, and be able to articulate some of the major problems and responses central to this area of philosophy.
Social and Political Philosophy, PHIL 182, TBA, scps, Philosophy; SCPS, Grob, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PHIL 274: Logic Session: A Instructor: VanderNat ONLINE
This course is a detailed study of the deductive methods and principles of correct reasoning, from both the traditional and modern point of view. Students will be able to formally analyze, evaluate, and demonstrate the various aspects of argumentation.
Logic, PHIL 274, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Philosophy, VanderNat, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PHIL 274 : Logic Session: B Instructor: Vander Nat ONLINE
This course is a detailed study of the deductive methods and principles of correct reasoning, from both the traditional and modern point of view. Students will be able to formally analyze, evaluate, and demonstrate the various aspects of argumentation.
Logic, PHIL 274 , Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Philosophy, Vander Nat, Summer Session B, ONLINE
PHIL 279: Judgment and Decision-making Session: A Instructor: Linn ONLINE
This course examines the philosophical and psychological foundations of decision-making. Students can take only one course from PHIL 279, PSYC 279, PSYC 280. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the principles of reasoning and decision-making.
Judgment and Decision-making, PHIL 279, TBA, cas, Philosophy, Linn, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PHIL 279: Judgment and Decision-making Session: A Instructor: Linn ONLINE
This course examines the philosophical and psychological foundations of decision-making. Students can take only one course from PHIL 279, PSYC 279, PSYC 280. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the principles of reasoning and decision-making.
Judgment and Decision-making, PHIL 279, TBA, cas, Philosophy, Linn, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PHIL 288: Culture and Civilization (Classical Chinese Philosophy) Session: A Instructor: Kim ONLINE
This course examines the nature, causes, and possible future development of human culture and civilization. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the various approaches to the philosophical study of human culture and civilization.
Culture and Civilization (Classical Chinese Philosophy), PHIL 288, TBA, cas, Philosophy, Kim, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PHIL 288 : Culture and Civilization (Classical Chinese Philosophy) Session: B Instructor: Kim ONLINE
This course examines the nature, causes, and possible future development of human culture and civilization. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the various approaches to the philosophical study of human culture and civilization.
Culture and Civilization (Classical Chinese Philosophy), PHIL 288 , TBA, cas, Philosophy, Kim, Summer Session B, ONLINE
PHIL 350: Directed Reading Session: A, B Instructor: TBA ONLINE
Independent research according to program developed jointly by the student and a faculty director. Open to majors and to non-majors with the permission of the chairperson. Students will be able to understand and articulate philosophical problems and answers regarding the selected topic.
Directed Reading, PHIL 350, TBA, cas, Philosophy, TBA, Summer Session A, B, ONLINE
PHYS 111: College Physics I Session: A Instructor: Klinger ONLINE
Non-calculus introduction to vectors, kinematics, Newtonian mechanics of translational, rotational, and oscillatory motion, energy and momentum conservation, and thermodynamics. Students will gain an understanding of analytical description of motion and application of conservation laws; develop scientific insight and proficiency in solving representative problems.
College Physics I, PHYS 111, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Physics, Klinger, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PHYS 111: College Physics I Session: A Instructor: Khamesian LSC
Non-calculus introduction to vectors, kinematics, Newtonian mechanics of translational, rotational, and oscillatory motion, energy and momentum conservation, and thermodynamics. Students will gain an understanding of analytical description of motion and application of conservation laws; develop scientific insight and proficiency in solving representative problems.
College Physics I, PHYS 111, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Physics, Khamesian, Summer Session A, LSC
PHYS 111: College Physics I Session: A Instructor: McNees LSC
Non-calculus introduction to vectors, kinematics, Newtonian mechanics of translational, rotational, and oscillatory motion, energy and momentum conservation, and thermodynamics. Students will gain an understanding of analytical description of motion and application of conservation laws; develop scientific insight and proficiency in solving representative problems.
College Physics I, PHYS 111, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Physics, McNees, Summer Session A, LSC
PHYS 111L: College Physics Lab I Session: A Instructor: Khamesian LSC
Laboratories cover selected topics in introductory mechanics, including freefall, uniform circular motion, work-energy, collisions, rotational motion, and harmonic motion. Students will gain experience and familiarity with basic measuring devices and simple mechanics equipment. Understand measurement errors and their propagation, plotting and interpretation of data, the connection between theory and experiment for selected topics in elementary mechanics.
College Physics Lab I, PHYS 111L, Mon, Wed, cas, Physics, Khamesian, Summer Session A, LSC
PHYS 111L: College Physics Lab I Session: A Instructor: Khamesian LSC
Laboratories cover selected topics in introductory mechanics, including freefall, uniform circular motion, work-energy, collisions, rotational motion, and harmonic motion. Students will gain experience and familiarity with basic measuring devices and simple mechanics equipment. Understand measurement errors and their propagation, plotting and interpretation of data, the connection between theory and experiment for selected topics in elementary mechanics.
College Physics Lab I, PHYS 111L, Mon, Wed, cas, Physics, Khamesian, Summer Session A, LSC
PHYS 111L: College Physics Lab I Session: A Instructor: Khamesian LSC
Laboratories cover selected topics in introductory mechanics, including freefall, uniform circular motion, work-energy, collisions, rotational motion, and harmonic motion. Students will gain experience and familiarity with basic measuring devices and simple mechanics equipment. Understand measurement errors and their propagation, plotting and interpretation of data, the connection between theory and experiment for selected topics in elementary mechanics.
College Physics Lab I, PHYS 111L, Tue, Thurs, cas, Physics, Khamesian, Summer Session A, LSC
PHYS 111L: College Physics Lab I Session: A Instructor: Klinger LSC
Laboratories cover selected topics in introductory mechanics, including freefall, uniform circular motion, work-energy, collisions, rotational motion, and harmonic motion. Students will gain experience and familiarity with basic measuring devices and simple mechanics equipment. Understand measurement errors and their propagation, plotting and interpretation of data, the connection between theory and experiment for selected topics in elementary mechanics.
College Physics Lab I , PHYS 111L, Tue, Thurs, cas, Physics, Klinger, Summer Session A, LSC
PHYS 111L: College Physics Lab I Session: A Instructor: Klinger LSC
Laboratories cover selected topics in introductory mechanics, including freefall, uniform circular motion, work-energy, collisions, rotational motion, and harmonic motion. Students will gain experience and familiarity with basic measuring devices and simple mechanics equipment. Understand measurement errors and their propagation, plotting and interpretation of data, the connection between theory and experiment for selected topics in elementary mechanics.
College Physics Lab I , PHYS 111L, Mon, Wed, cas, Physics, Klinger, Summer Session A, LSC
PHYS 112: College Physics II Session: B Instructor: Henner ONLINE
This course is a continuation of Physics 111. Lecture and discussion of electricity and magnetism, sound, optics and selected topics from modern physics.
College Physics II , PHYS 112, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Physics, Henner, Summer Session B, ONLINE
PHYS 112: College Physics II Session: B Instructor: Craita LSC
This course is a continuation of Physics 111. Lecture and discussion of electricity and magnetism, sound, optics and selected topics from modern physics.
College Physics II, PHYS 112, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Physics, Craita, Summer Session B, LSC
PHYS 112 : College Physics II Session: B Instructor: TBA LSC
This course is a continuation of Physics 111. Lecture and discussion of electricity and magnetism, sound, optics and selected topics from modern physics.
College Physics II, PHYS 112 , Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Physics, TBA, Summer Session B, LSC
PHYS 112L: College Physics Lab II Session: B Instructor: Rizal LSC
One two-hour laboratory period per week, to complement Physics 112.
College Physics Lab II, PHYS 112L, Mon, Wed, cas, Physics, Rizal, Summer Session B, LSC
PHYS 112L: College Physics Lab II Session: B Instructor: Craita LSC
One two-hour laboratory period per week, to complement Physics 112.
College Physics Lab II , PHYS 112L, Mon, Wed, cas, Physics, Craita, Summer Session B, LSC
PHYS 112L: College Physics Lab II Session: B Instructor: Craita LSC
One two-hour laboratory period per week, to complement Physics 112.
College Physics Lab II , PHYS 112L, Tue, Thurs, cas, Physics, Craita, Summer Session B, LSC
PHYS 112L: College Physics Lab II Session: B Instructor: Moore LSC
College Physics Lab II , PHYS 112L, Tue, Thurs, cas, Physics, Moore, Summer Session B, LSC
PHYS 112L : College Physics Lab II Session: B Instructor: Rizal LSC
One two-hour laboratory period per week, to complement Physics 112.
College Physics Lab II, PHYS 112L , Mon, Wed, cas, Physics, Rizal, Summer Session B, LSC
PHYS 121 : College Physics I Lec/Dis Session: A Instructor: Abuzayyad LSC
Calculus based introduction to vectors, kinematics, Newtonian mechanics of translational, rotational, and oscillatory motion, energy and momentum conservation, and thermodynamics. Student will have an understanding of analytical description of motion and application of conservation laws; develop scientific insight and proficiency in solving representative problems.
College Physics I Lec/Dis, PHYS 121 , Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Physics, Abuzayyad, Summer Session A, LSC
PHYS 122: College Phys II Lec/Dis Session: B Instructor: Rizal LSC
Physics 121 and 122 provide a calculus based introduction to physics. Topics include electricity and magnetism, sound, optics, and selected topics from modern physics. Students will understand and apply electromagnetism to 2- and 3-dimensional problems in physical and biological sciences.
College Phys II Lec/Dis , PHYS 122, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Physics, Rizal, Summer Session B, LSC
PLSC 100: Political Theory Session: A Instructor: Schumacher ONLINE
An introduction to political theory, covering the principal ideas, controversies and institutions of political society. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of major approaches to the normative study of politics; to identify the assumptions underlying philosophical arguments; and to critically assess different theories of political justice.
Political Theory, PLSC 100, TBA, cas, Political Science, Schumacher, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PLSC 101: American Politics Session: A Instructor: Blackmond Larnell ONLINE
American national government and politics, including institutions, group and electoral processes, and public policy. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the American political system, the patterns of political participation and behavior of diverse individuals and groups in American society, and evaluate the roles and processes of U.S. political institutions.
American Politics, PLSC 101, TBA, cas, Political Science, Blackmond Larnell, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PLSC 102: International Relations in an Age of Globalization Session: B Instructor: Grigorescu ONLINE
Competing perspectives on international politics and global issues such as North-South relations, human rights, war and peace, population growth, and environmentalism. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the main approaches to the study of international politics and to analyze and assess such major substantive issues as interstate war, terrorism, arms control, international political economy and sustainable development.
International Relations in an Age of Globalization, PLSC 102, TBA, cas, Political Science, Grigorescu, Summer Session B, ONLINE
PLSC 300A: Cont. Political Issues (Inside the Beltway) Session: Early Instructor: Hansen ONLINE
A study of how power works in Washington, DC, focusing on the complex relationships between elected officials, the federal bureaucracy, interest groups, and media organizations. This course, taught on site in DC, involves classroom discussion, guest speakers, and visits to political institutions.
Cont. Political Issues (Inside the Beltway), PLSC 300A, TBA, cas, Political Science, Hansen, Summer Session Early, ONLINE
PLSC 300A: Contemporary Political Issues: Hollywood, Law & Politics Session: B Instructor: Savage ONLINE
The course will explore how American politics is seen through the eyes of the movies. It will examine themes such as inequality, racism, representation, government corruption, and political scandal.
Contemporary Political Issues: Hollywood, Law & Politics, PLSC 300A, TBA, cas, Political Science, Savage, Summer Session B, ONLINE
PLSC 358: War, Peace, and Politics Session: A Instructor: Melin ONLINE
The historical evolution of war, the nature of wars in the 20th century and into the 21st century, the nature of threats, sources of conflict, and procedures for peaceful resolution of disputes. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principal causes of wars, the means and ends of warfare, and the process and prospects of reestablishing peace.
War, Peace, and Politics, PLSC 358, TBA, cas, Political Science, Melin, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PLSC 370: Fieldwork in Political Science Session: B Instructor: Grigorescu ONLINE
Practical experience in political and governmental agencies and organizations in Chicago and Washington, D.C. Students learn about different forms of public service and the ethical responsibilities of civic engagement. Working in a professional office for fifteen weeks allows students to experience the world of public service first-hand. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of models of leadership and public service by working with supervisors who are typically leaders in their fields.
Fieldwork in Political Science, PLSC 370, TBA, cas, Grigorescu, Summer Session B, ONLINE
PLSC 396: Directed Readings Session: A, B Instructor: Grigorescu ONLINE
Please see the department for details.
Directed Readings, PLSC 396, TBA, cas, Political Science, Grigorescu, Summer Session A, B, ONLINE
PLST 333: Legal Research and Writing II Session: C Instructor: Mentkowski ONLINE
Further instruction in legal research skills, focusing on locating, analyzing and updating statutory and administrative law. Practice in researching statutory and administrative law in hard copy and online. Drafting routine legal correspondence.
Legal Research and Writing II, PLST 333, Tue, scps, Paralegal Studies, Mentkowski, Summer Session C, ONLINE
PLST 335: Legal Ethics Session: C Instructor: Stevens ONLINE
Ethical considerations in the practice of law that paralegals are likely to encounter, especially the unauthorized practice of law, client confidentiality and conflicts of interest. Review of ethical codes for attorneys and paralegals.
Legal Ethics, PLST 335, Mon, scps, Paralegal Studies, Stevens, Summer Session C, ONLINE
PLST 336: Corporate Topics for Litigation Paralegals Session: C Instructor: Sunderlin WTC
Required for the Litigation Practice Certificate. An introduction to the basic principles of agency law, contract law, and the forms of business organizations: sole proprietorships, partnerships (general, registered limited liability and limited), limited liability companies, and corporations.
Corporate Topics for Litigation Paralegals, PLST 336, Tue, scps, Paralegal Studies, Sunderlin, Summer Session C, WTC
PLST 341 : Civil Litigation II Session: C Instructor: Stevens ONLINE
Further instruction in the litigation process, focusing on the discovery, trial, and post-trial stages. Topics include interrogatories, depositions, document production and inspection requests, other discovery tools, settlement negotiations, organization of case files, document control systems, trial preparation, trial procedure, and post-trial proceedings. Overview of alternative dispute resolution. Outcomes: Students will be able to conduct client interviews and pre-litigation investigations, and to draft the pleadings initiating lawsuits and proceeding through pre-trial motion practice.
Civil Litigation II, PLST 341 , Thurs, scps, Paralegal Studies, Stevens, Summer Session C, ONLINE
PLST 342: Litigation Technology & eDiscovery Session: C Instructor: TBA WTC
Hands-on instruction in software programs (Relativity) commonly used for litigation support, including electronic court filing, eDiscovery, case management, document control and trial presentation. Outcomes: Students will be able to assist attorneys in preparing for and conducting trials.
Litigation Technology & eDiscovery, PLST 342, Thurs, scps, Paralegal Studies, TBA, Summer Session C, WTC
PLST 345: Law Office Computer Applications Session: C Instructor: Van Pelt ONLINE
Hands-on instruction in software programs commonly used in law offices: word processing (templates, redlining, tables), spreadsheets (financial data, charts and graphs), pdf management (creating and combining pdfs, creating a portfolio, redacting, adding security) and presentation graphics. Outcomes: Students will be proficient in the fundamentals of word processing (templates, redlining, tables), spreadsheets (financial data, charts and graphs), database management (organizing, sorting, and retrieving information), and presentation graphics.
Law Office Computer Applications, PLST 345, Wed, scps, Paralegal Studies, Van Pelt, Summer Session C, ONLINE
PLST 349: Torts Session: C Instructor: Kourvetaris WTC
An introduction to civil tort liability, including the intentional torts, negligence, strict liability, and product liability. Role of the paralegal in personal injury litigation. Practice in client interviewing techniques. Basic factual investigation techniques. Outcomes: Students will be familiar with the paralegal's role in personal injury litigation from both the plaintiff's and defendant's viewpoints, including typical pleadings and other documents.
Torts, PLST 349, Wed, scps, Paralegal Studies , Kourvetaris, Summer Session C, WTC
PLST 352: Intellectual Property: Trademarks and Copyrights Session: C Instructor: Lance ONLINE
An introduction to the terminology, basic principles and documentation requirements of trademark and copyright protection. Registration procedures and infringement disputes. Outcomes: Students will be familiar with registration procedures (including preparation of basic forms and documents) and infringement disputes.
Intellectual Property: Trademarks and Copyrights, PLST 352, Wed, scps, Paralegal Studies, Lance, Summer Session C, ONLINE
PLST 366 : Litigation Topics for Corporate Paralegals Session: C Instructor: TBA ONLINE
Required for Corporate Practice Certificate. This course introduces the civil litigation process in state (Illinois) and federal courts, from the initial phases of pre-litigation investigations and pleadings through the discovery, trial, and post-trial phases. Technological innovations affecting civil litigation, such as electronic court filing and e-discovery procedures, will be given special emphasis.
Litigation Topics for Corporate Paralegals, PLST 366 , Thurs, scps, Paralegal Studies, TBA, Summer Session C, ONLINE
PLST 398: Internship Session: C Instructor: Harrigan ONLINE
Consent of Director and completion of 14-16 semester hours of study. Limited to student's last or second-last term of study. Practical experience (120 hours on site) for advanced students in applying paralegal skills within selected law firms, corporate law departments and governmental agencies. One mandatory class meeting, online journal, online discussions, and final paper. All internships are unpaid; only one internship may be completed for credit toward certificate.
Internship, PLST 398, TBA, scps, Paralegal Studies, Harrigan, Summer Session C, ONLINE
PSYC 101: General Psychology Session: A Instructor: Leach ONLINE
Basic concepts and methods of psychology. Primary emphasis on the scientific study of consciousness and human behavior. Topics include: human development, personality, learning, thinking, perception, testing, mental illness and mental health, and biological and social aspects of behavior.
General Psychology, PSYC 101, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Psychology, Leach, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PSYC 101: General Psychology Session: B Instructor: Leon ONLINE
Introduction to concepts, theories, and methods in psychology. Emphasis is given to the scientific study of consciousness and human behavior. Topics include: human development, learning, thinking, perception, personality, testing, mental illness and mental health, biological and social aspects of behavior.
General Psychology, PSYC 101, TBA, cas, Psychology, Leon, Summer Session B, ONLINE
PSYC 201 : Psychology Advising and Career Development Session: A Instructor: Wilson ONLINE
Overview of the psychology major at Loyola and career options in psychology. Introduces students to psychology career development resources. Students will also prepare for opportunities in independent research and internships and plan for a career including creating a resume and CV. Students will learn about career options in psychology and plan their psychology major to support and develop their career interests.
Psychology Advising and Career Development, PSYC 201 , Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Psychology, Wilson, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PSYC 201: Psychology Advising and Career Development Session: B Instructor: Morrison ONLINE
Overview of the psychology major at Loyola and career options in psychology. Introduces students to psychology career development resources. Students will also prepare for opportunities in independent research and internships and plan for a career including creating a resume and CV. Students will learn about career options in psychology and plan their psychology major to support and develop their career interests.
Psychology Advising and Career Development, PSYC 201, Mon, Wed, cas, Psychology, Morrison, Summer Session B, ONLINE
PSYC 238: Gender & Sex Differences & Similarities Session: A Instructor: Huntsinger ONLINE
This course is an overview of psychological research and theory concerning differences and similarities between genders. Students will understand similarities and differences between genders, comprehend the diversity of ideas about gender and how ideas of gender are determined by societies and cultures.
Gender & Sex Differences & Similarities, PSYC 238, TBA, cas, Psychology, Huntsinger, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PSYC 250: Cognitive Psychology Session: A Instructor: Neal LSC
Overview of cognitive psychology. Topics include: human information processing, object recognition, memory, attention, language production and comprehension, reasoning and problem solving. Students will understand and be able to explain how knowledge about mental events is obtained using a variety of experimental methods, discuss current empirical research and theories of cognition, understand well established cognitive theories about attention, memory, language processing, reasoning and decision-making
Cognitive Psychology, PSYC 250, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Psychology, Neal, Summer Session A, LSC
PSYC 273: Developmental Psychology Session: A Instructor: Morales LSC
Analysis of human thoughts, feelings and actions as influenced by other people. Topics include socialization, perception of self and others, prosocial and antisocial behavior, attitudes, interpersonal attraction, social influence and group behavior.
Developmental Psychology, PSYC 273, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Psychology, Morales, Summer Session A, LSC
PSYC 273: Developmental Psychology Session: B Instructor: Morales LSC
Survey of theory and research relevant to human growth and development with emphasis on physical, cognitive, and social development from infancy through adolescence. Students will demonstrate understanding of basic theory and research in human development, and will develop skills in critical examination of psychological research as applied to current issues in human development.
Developmental Psychology, PSYC 273, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Psychology, Morales, Summer Session B, LSC
PSYC 273 : Developmental Psychology Session: A Instructor: Price ONLINE
Survey of theory and research relevant to human growth and development with emphasis on physical, cognitive, and social development from infancy through adolescence. Students will demonstrate understanding of basic theory and research in human development, and will develop skills in critical examination of psychological research as applied to current issues in human development.
Developmental Psychology, PSYC 273 , TBA, cas, scps, SCPS; Psychology, Price, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PSYC 275: Social Psychology Session: B Instructor: DeHart ONLINE
Analysis of human thoughts, feelings and actions as influenced by other people. Topics include socialization, perception of self and others, prosocial and antisocial behavior, attitudes, interpersonal attraction, social influence and group behavior. Group B.
Social Psychology, PSYC 275, TBA, cas, Psychology, DeHart, Summer Session B, ONLINE
PSYC 275: Social Psychology Session: A Instructor: DeHart ONLINE
Analysis of human thoughts, feelings and actions as influenced by other people. Topics include socialization, perception of self and others, prosocial and antisocial behavior, attitudes, interpersonal attraction, social influence and group behavior.
Social Psychology, PSYC 275, TBA, cas, Psychology , DeHart, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PSYC 304: Statistics Session: A Instructor: Stiedl ONLINE
Fundamentals of statistical analysis in psychology and related fields. Topics include frequency distributions, central tendency, variability, graphical presentation, normal distribution correlation, sampling distributions and tests of statistical significance including analysis of variance.
Statistics, PSYC 304, TBA, cas, Psychology, Stiedl, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PSYC 304: Statistics Session: B Instructor: Hagy ONLINE
Fundamentals of statistical analysis in psychology and related fields. Topics include frequency distributions, central tendency, variability, graphical presentation, normal distribution correlation, sampling distributions and tests of statistical significance including analysis of variance. This course is an introduction to fundamentals of statistical analysis in psychology.. Outcome: Students will demonstrate the ability to analyze data, interpret the results of research using basic statistical methods, and understand the conceptual foundation, appropriate use, and limitations of these statistical methods.
Statistics, PSYC 304, TBA, cas, Psychology, Hagy, Summer Session B, ONLINE
PSYC 306: Research Methods Session: A Instructor: Hagy ONLINE
Logic and theory of the scientific method. Basic statistics and principles of research methodologies employed in approaching major problem areas in psychology. Written descriptions of research findings. This is a writing intensive course.
Research Methods, PSYC 306, Tue, cas, Psychology, Hagy, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PSYC 306: Research Methods Session: B Instructor: Moaz ONLINE
Logic and theory of the scientific method. Basic statistics and principles of research methodologies employed in approaching major problem areas in psychology. Written descriptions of research findings. This is a writing intensive course.
Research Methods, PSYC 306, TBA, cas, Psychology, Moaz, Summer Session B, ONLINE
PSYC 314: Lab in Experimental Psychology: Cognition Session: C Instructor: Gobel ONLINE
Laboratory demonstrations, experiments, and microcomputer applications in the area of human cognition. Topics vary, but include learning, memory, thinking and language processing. Students gain skills and experience in experimental design, measurement, statistical analyses, and report writing as they relate to research on human cognition.
Lab in Experimental Psychology: Cognition, PSYC 314, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Psychology, Gobel, Summer Session C, ONLINE
PSYC 318: Lab in Developmental Session: B Instructor: Perry LSC
Lecture and laboratory on empirical studies of developmental processes in humans. Focus is on research in particular content areas within developmental stages (e.g., infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood) and research on changes in behavior across time. Students will demonstrate skills and knowledge of developmental methodology, designing, conducting, and analyzing and interpreting the results of a research project, and writing a research paper in APA format.
Lab in Developmental, PSYC 318, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Psychology, Perry, Summer Session B, LSC
PSYC 321: Lab in Social Session: A Instructor: Moaz ONLINE
Lectures, demonstrations, readings, and individual or group research projects illustrating various methods, such as observation, interviewing, archives, standardized tests, and experimentation, are used to learn about topics such as group influences on the individual, attitudes, prosocial and antisocial behavior, and perception of self and others. Students will demonstrate skills and knowledge of methodology in social psychological research; designing, conducting, analyzing and interpreting the results of a research project, and writing a research paper in APA format.
Lab in Social, PSYC 321, TBA, cas, Psychology, Moaz, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PSYC 321: Lab in Social Psychology Session: A Instructor: Yustisia LSC
Lectures, demonstrations, readings, and individual or group research projects illustrating various methods, such as observation, interviewing, archives, standardized tests, and experimentation, are used to learn about topics such as group influences on the individual, attitudes, prosocial and antisocial behavior, and perception of self and others. Students will demonstrate skills and knowledge of methodology in social psychological research; designing, conducting, analyzing and interpreting the results of a research project, and writing a research paper in APA format.
Lab in Social Psychology, PSYC 321, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Psychology, Yustisia, Summer Session A, LSC
PSYC 327: Lab in Body Image Session: A Instructor: Kellogg LSC
Lab on Body Image is a new course that can be used by Psychology students to fulfill the B lab requirement. It will focus on the scholarly study of body image and eating disorders, as well as how research is conducted in the field. Students will complete smaller labs and a larger research project in the field. Students will : 1. Learn about the scholarly study of body image and eating disorders. 2. Learn general research methods in Psychology and specific ones pertaining to the topic. 3. Learn about computer packages, including SPSS to analyze data
Lab in Body Image, PSYC 327, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Psychology, Kellogg, Summer Session A, LSC
PSYC 331: Psychopathology Session: A Instructor: Sandberg ONLINE
Nature and causes of maladjustment and mental disorders. History of mental illness, diagnosis, research, and treatment of mental disorders. Students will demonstrate understanding of current approaches to researching maladaptive behavior, current views of maladaptive behavior, major categories of mental disorders, factors contributing to development of problems, different types of intervention strategies, and appreciation of social, ethical, and legal issues.
Psychopathology, PSYC 331, TBA, cas, Psychology, Sandberg, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PSYC 331: Psychopathology Session: B Instructor: Hareli ONLINE
Nature and causes of maladjustment and mental disorders. History of mental illness, diagnosis, research, and treatment of mental disorders. Students will demonstrate understanding of current approaches to researching maladaptive behavior, current views of maladaptive behavior, major categories of "mental disorders", factors contributing to development of problems, different types of intervention strategies, and appreciation of social, ethical, and legal issues.
Psychopathology, PSYC 331, TBA, cas, Psychology, Hareli, Summer Session B, ONLINE
PSYC 360: Understanding Prejudice Session: B Instructor: Mitchell LSC
Prejudice from a psychological perspective. Applying psychological concepts, research, and theory to understand the origins and consequences of prejudice as well as potential remedies. Students will learn the origins of stereotypes and prejudice, the nature of prejudice against different social groups, how people are affected by prejudice and cope with prejudice, and the processes that may change stereotypes, reduce prejudice, and improve intergroup relations.
Understanding Prejudice, PSYC 360, Wed, cas, Psychology, Mitchell, Summer Session B, LSC
PSYC 368: Counseling Session: A Instructor: Davis LSC
Introduction to the principles, theories, ethics, and techniques of major helping interventions including the clinical interview and use of the case history, individual and group approaches. Students will demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate different approaches to intervention in terms of their theoretical underpinnings, application to diverse problems, goals and populations, general effectiveness, and overall strengths and limitations.
Counseling, PSYC 368, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Psychology, Davis, Summer Session A, LSC
PSYC 387: Seminar in Behavioral and Cognitive Neurosciences Session: A Instructor: Morrison ONLINE
Lecture/discussions will focus on issues central to behavioral neuroscience, emphasizing human and animal mental processes and neural information processing mechanisms. Students will read primary research papers and practice analytical skills in class discussion and presentations. Presentations and exams will promote critical thinking and a general understanding of current issues in behavioral and cognitive neurosciences. Students will become familiar with principles of cognitive and behavioral approaches to the study of the neural bases of behavior. Students will also learn how to critically read primary research papers and present these papers to the class
Seminar in Behavioral and Cognitive Neurosciences, PSYC 387, Mon, Wed, cas, Psychology, Morrison, Summer Session A, ONLINE
PSYC 390: Internship in Psychology Session: C Instructor: Stilton ONLINE
Capstone service-learning experience for psychology majors, involving application and development of psychological knowledge and skills through an internship (100 hours) in a human service organization or applied research setting, combined with regular class meetings, reading and writing assignments. Students arrange placements and complete a project on site. Students will learn practical, pre-professional job skills, critical analysis and connection between theory and practice, on topics of: human service agency operation; effective working relationships; professional communication; cultural competence; values and ethics.
Internship in Psychology, PSYC 390, TBA, cas, Psychology , Stilton, Summer Session C, ONLINE
SCMG 332: Operations Management Session: A Instructor: Mink ONLINE
Introduction to concepts and methods for managing production and service operations. Topics include demand forecasting, aggregate and capacity planning, inventory management, facility layout and location, just-in-time, managing quality, project planning, resource allocation, and logistics. Understanding of basic issues and role of operations management in organizations, and of tools for problem-solving in operations management.
Operations Management, SCMG 332, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Information Systems and Supply Chain Management, Mink, Summer Session A, ONLINE
SCMG 332: Operations Management Session: B Instructor: Mink ONLINE
An introduction to the topic of management of operations in manufacturing and services, which is about how firms efficiently produce goods and services. Topics include demand forecasting, aggregate and capacity planning, inventory management, layout, just-in-time (JIT), and managing quality. Additional topics may include location, project planning, resource allocation and logistics.
Operations Management, SCMG 332, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Information Systems and Supply Chain Management, Mink, Summer Session B, ONLINE
SOCL 101: Society in a Global Age Session: A Instructor: LaVergne ONLINE
This is a foundational course in the social sciences which explores the effect of globalization on everyday life in the United States and elsewhere, using the basic perspectives and methodologies of sociology.
Society in a Global Age, SOCL 101, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Sociology, LaVergne, Summer Session A, ONLINE
SOCL 101: Society in a Global Age Session: B Instructor: Kinsella ONLINE
This is a foundational course in the social sciences which explores the effect of globalization on everyday life in the United States and elsewhere, using the basic perspectives and methodologies of sociology.
Society in a Global Age, SOCL 101, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Sociology, Kinsella, Summer Session B, ONLINE
SOCL 122: Race and Ethnic Relations Session: C Instructor: Navarrete ONLINE
This course examines the development of cultural, society, and self-understanding by exploring the social construction of race in the United States. The course explores how social constructions of race affect interpersonal relations, laws, policies, and practices in various racial and ethnic communities. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the conditions which have worsened racial tensions as well as how social movements have been successful at eradicating racially oppressive laws and working towards a just society.
Race and Ethnic Relations, SOCL 122, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Sociology, Navarrete, Summer Session C, ONLINE
SOCL 125: Chicago: Urban Metropolis Session: A Instructor: Baber ONLINE
This course explores the development of Chicago metropolitan region from the 1830's to the present day. Students will explore the urban area not only through texts, but also through fieldwork. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the geography, history, and people of the Chicago metropolitan region.
Chicago: Urban Metropolis, SOCL 125, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Sociology, Baber, Summer Session A, ONLINE
SOCL 215 : Law & Society Session: A Instructor: Begicevic ONLINE
This course trains students to examine the law as a sociological concept and to look at the relationship between the legal system and society. A critical concern is whether changes in the legal system reflect societal change or do changes in the legal system stimulate change in society. Students learn to recognize the close linkage between the law and social structure. They also gain experience examining legal texts and decisions.
Law & Society, SOCL 215 , Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Sociology, Begicevic, Summer Session A, ONLINE
SOCL 252 : Global Inequalities Session: B Instructor: Zohara ONLINE
This course examines inequality on a global scale, focusing on the impact of glibalization processes on race, class and gender inequalities here and abroad. Students will analyze how race, class and gender inequalities influence each other across national boundaries, and will recognize global causes and consequences of inequality.
Global Inequalities, SOCL 252 , Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Sociology, Zohara, Summer Session B, ONLINE
SOCL 380: Internship Session: C Instructor: Wedam ONLINE
Supervised field experience for students working in a selected community organization, government agency, social agency, or business.
Internship, SOCL 380, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Sociology, Wedam, Summer Session C, ONLINE
SOCL 397 : Independent Study Projects Session: A Instructor: Rosenblatt ONLINE
Independent study of a topic delineated by the student in collaboration with an individual faculty member. Student gains experience and expertise in defining and conducting independent scholarly work.
Independent Study Projects, SOCL 397 , TBA, cas, Sociology, Rosenblatt, Summer Session A, ONLINE
SOCL 398: Independent Study Session: C Instructor: Rosenblatt ONLINE
Independent research done in collaboration with a faculty member on a sociological topic defined by the student in consultation with a faculty member. Student gains experience and expertise conducting independent research.
Independent Study, SOCL 398, TBA, cas, Sociology, Rosenblatt, Summer Session C, ONLINE
SPAN 101: Spanish I Session: A Instructor: Burgo ONLINE
This course is an introduction to the basic elements of Spanish language and culture. It is designed for students with no previous experience in Spanish. Students will be able to understand simple messages and short narratives, respond to basic inquiries about themselves and others, formulate basic questions, as well as understand basic written texts.
Spanish I, SPAN 101, Mon, Wed, cas, Modern Languages and Literatures, Burgo, Summer Session A, ONLINE
SPAN 101: Spanish I Session: A Instructor: Obrist ONLINE
This course is an introduction to the basic elements of Spanish language and culture. It is designed for students with no previous experience in Spanish. Students will be able to understand simple messages and short narratives, respond to basic inquiries about themselves and others, formulate basic questions, as well as understand basic written texts.
Spanish I, SPAN 101, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures , Obrist, Summer Session A, ONLINE
SPAN 102: Spanish II Session: A Instructor: Knight ONLINE
This course builds on 101, and introduces students to new topics and grammatical structures. Students will be able to produce sounds in Spanish more accurately, express appropriate reactions to ordinary situations, understand basic oral commands, read more complex texts, and write sentences in cohesive paragraphs.
Spanish II, SPAN 102, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Knight, Summer Session A, ONLINE
SPAN 102: Spanish II Session: B Instructor: Carillo ONLINE
This course builds on 101, and introduces students to new topics and grammatical structures. Students will be able to produce sounds in Spanish more accurately, express appropriate reactions to ordinary situations, understand basic oral commands, read more complex texts, and write sentences in cohesive paragraphs.
Spanish II, SPAN 102, Tue, Thurs, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Carillo, Summer Session B, ONLINE
STAT 103: Fundamentals of Statistics Session: A Instructor: Rohn ONLINE
This course provides an introduction to statistical reasoning and techniques in descriptive and inferential statistics and their applications in economics, education, genetics, medicine, physics, political science, and psychology. Not open to students who have completed ISOM 241. Students will obtain a background in the fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistics along with an understanding of their uses and misuses. This course satisfies the quantitative literacy requirement of the core curriculum.
Fundamentals of Statistics, STAT 103, Tue, Thurs, cas, Mathematics & Statistics , Rohn, Summer Session A, ONLINE
STAT 103: Fundamentals of Statistics Session: B Instructor: Krueger ONLINE
This course provides an introduction to statistical reasoning and techniques in descriptive and inferential statistics and their applications in economics, education, genetics, medicine, physics, political science, and psychology. Not open to students who have completed ISOM 241. Students will obtain a background in the fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistics along with an understanding of their uses and misuses. This course satisfies the quantitative literacy requirement of the core curriculum.
Fundamentals of Statistics, STAT 103, Mon, Wed, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Krueger, Summer Session B, ONLINE
STAT 103: Fundamentals of Statistics Session: C Instructor: Moran ONLINE
This course provides an introduction to statistical reasoning and techniques in descriptive and inferential statistics and their applications in economics, education, genetics, medicine, physics, political science, and psychology. Not open to students who have completed ISOM 241. Students will obtain a background in the fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistics along with an understanding of their uses and misuses. This course satisfies the quantitative literacy requirement of the core curriculum.
Fundamentals of Statistics, STAT 103, Sat, cas, scps, SCPS; Mathematics & Statistics, Moran, Summer Session C, ONLINE
STAT 321: Computational Aspects of Modeling and Simulation Session: A Instructor: Matthews ONLINE
This course uses SAS and R languages to address statistical modelling and to conduct statistical simulations to assess linear, generalized linear, nonlinear and complex models and experimental designs. Students will gain practical experience and knowledge in real-world statistical situations for which underlying theory is cumbersome or intractable.
Computational Aspects of Modeling and Simulation, STAT 321, Tue, Thurs, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Matthews, Summer Session A, ONLINE
STAT 335 / BIOL 335: Introduction to Biostatistics Session: A Instructor: Longman LSC
This course provides an introduction to the statistical methods used in designing biological experiments and in data analysis, including computer laboratory assignments with biological data. Students interested in research in the life sciences will obtain a background in the appropriate use of statistical methods as an experimental tool.
Introduction to Biostatistics, STAT 335 / BIOL 335, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Mathematics & Statistics; Biology, Longman, Summer Session A, LSC
STAT 398: Independent Study in Statistics Session: A, B Instructor: Perry ONLINE
This course allows students to engage in independent study on selected topics in statistics under the supervision of a faculty member. Students will obtain an understanding of an advanced topic in their major.
Independent Study in Statistics, STAT 398, TBA, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Perry, Summer Session A, B, ONLINE
THEO 100: Christian Theology (Hearing Women's Voices) Session: A Instructor: Calpino ONLINE
Theology is thinking about how human beings relate to one another as much as it is thinking about God. The vast majority of the Christian intellectual tradition used the Western, male perspective to converse about what it means to be human. However, since women comprise half of the global population, this course will seek to draw students into a dialogue with important female voices throughout history to promote engagement with the ¿big ideas¿ of Christian theology. We will self-consciously forefront questions of race, gender, eco-feminism, religious pluralism, and cultural norms about bodies to work toward a more inclusive and just version of the theological project. A good metaphor for the type of engagement this course promotes is pilgrimage, namely creating an intentional space to promote a shared reflection on the meaning of our most deeply held religious, personal, and cultural values. This course is an introduction to reflection on and analysis of the Christian theological tradition. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the tasks of Christian theology in its efforts to understand the human situation from the perspective of faith, various challenges to theology in the contemporary world, and will focus on one or more current theological issues.
Christian Theology (Hearing Women's Voices), THEO 100, TBA, cas, Theology, Calpino, Summer Session A, ONLINE
THEO 100 : Christian Theology (Theology and Story) Session: A Instructor: Cain ONLINE
This course is an introduction to the Christian theological tradition through the lens of story. The primary goal of this course is to enable students to identify, understand, and critically engage with various theological questions and presuppositions found in a variety of ancient and contemporary texts and films. We will explore a variety of theological themes (original sin, theological anthropology, the problem of evil, etc). In doing so, we will analyze the place of story, looking both at the Christian story as well as theological elements inherent in stories that do not appear to be overtly religious. This course introduces students to fundamental theological issues as well as some of the ways that various cultures and individuals have confronted the pressing questions of meaning in human life. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the tasks of Christian theology in its efforts to understand the human situation from the perspective of faith, various challenges to theology in the contemporary world, and will focus on one or more current theological issues.
Christian Theology (Theology and Story), THEO 100 , TBA, cas, Theology, Cain, Summer Session A, ONLINE
THEO 107: Introduction to Religious Studies Session: A Instructor: Lewis ONLINE
This course is an introduction to the discipline of religious studies including select theories, methods, and categories. As we work through historical and contemporary case studies of religion, two questions will guide our discussions ¿ what are we assuming is ¿religion¿ or ¿religious¿ and, then, how exactly do we study it? In particular, we will look at how forces such as modernity, secularism, globalism, gender, race, ethnicity, politics, economics, and post-modernity shape any view of religion and how religion, in turn, shapes these categories as part of a dynamic relationship. Staying true to religious studies interdisciplinary nature, this class will draw from materials from such fields as anthropology, biology, sociology, psychology, law, philosophy and literature in attempt to not only see the far-ranging influence of religion but also acknowledge its complexity. In the spirit of general humanities curriculum, we endeavor to cultivate our capacities for multiple perspective taking, empathy, critical evaluation, curiosity, and wonder. Students will be able to analyze and interpret various ways in which religious traditions intersect with contemporary issues.
Introduction to Religious Studies, THEO 107, TBA, cas, Theology , Lewis, Summer Session A, ONLINE
THEO 107: Introduction to Religious Studies Session: B Instructor: Lester ONLINE
Ritual in the Key of Life This course will introduce students to the disciplined description, analysis, and interpretation of religion. This course is designed to help students with diverse interests and majors reflect on the role of religion today. How do religious beliefs and ritual shape our own communities? And, how might knowledge about religion enable critical reflection and ethical action in our personal and professional lives? Together we will survey a range of religious traditions (ancient and modern) practiced around the world. To see how beliefs are embodied in ritual practices, we will observe, describe, and analyze case studies from religious texts, ritual performances, and current affairs. We will pay special attention to examples in three thematic clusters: (1) religious scriptures; (2) gender and social structure; and (3) death and loss. This course is designed to help students develop the tools for critical and reflective thinking with a focus on the cross-cultural analysis of religion.
Introduction to Religious Studies, THEO 107, TBA, cas, Theology , Lester, Summer Session B, ONLINE
THEO 190: Loyola's Mission: Theology Session: A Instructor: Sever ONLINE
The course introduces students to LUC's mission through theological reflection on the main themes of the Transformative Education mission-statement: spirituality and faith, interlinked human knowing, moral compass, civic and environmental responsibility. Outcome: Integration into the LUC community, ethos, and vision.
Loyola's Mission: Theology, THEO 190, TBA, scps, SCPS, Sever, Summer Session A, ONLINE
THEO 232: New Testament Session: A Instructor: Andrejevs ONLINE
This course is an introduction to the historical and theological reading of the various documents of early Christianity known as the New Testament. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the literary genres found in the New Testament and explain why the recognition of genre is essential to the interpretation of the New Testament, as well as the importance of how the New Testament documents have reached their present state.
New Testament , THEO 232, TBA, cas, Theology, Andrejevs, Summer Session A, ONLINE
THEO 267 : Jesus Christ Session: B Instructor: Svebakken LSC
This course examines the life of Jesus Christ, utilizing the Gospels, the writings of Paul and other biblical authors, the early ecumenical councils, and the history of church doctrine, including contemporary scholarship.
Jesus Christ, THEO 267 , Mon, Wed, cas, Theology, Svebakken, Summer Session B, LSC
THEO 278: Religion and Gender Session: A Instructor: Dickinson ONLINE
This course will study the role of women in at least one (if not more) of the major world religious traditions. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the influence of religion on gender roles, and how women in the contemporary world are reinterpreting their religious traditions.
Religion and Gender, THEO 278, TBA, cas, Theology, Dickinson, Summer Session A, ONLINE
THEO 282: Hinduism Session: A Instructor: Pintchman ONLINE
This course provides an introduction to Hinduism. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the most important Hindu scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Hinduism, the key Hindu concepts, terms, values, and religious practices, and the basic narratives and imagery of Hinduism.
Hinduism, THEO 282, Tue, Thurs, cas, Theology, Pintchman, Summer Session A, ONLINE
THEO 299 : Religions of Asia Session: B Instructor: Wang ONLINE
An introductory survey of selected teachings, institutions, and practices of the great religious traditions of South Asia and East Asia placed in historical context. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the central texts, beliefs, ethical understandings, and practices of at least three Asian religions.
Religions of Asia, THEO 299 , TBA, cas, Theology, Wang, Summer Session B, ONLINE
THTR 100: Intro to the Theatrical Experience Session: A Instructor: Mann ONLINE
This course is an introductory study of the theatrical art form and its contemporary production practice. Students will demonstrate the ability to identify the variety of collaborating arts and artists that combine to create of a work of theatre; to analyze a play script for live performance; to evaluate theatrical production; and to creatively apply knowledge of theatrical process through expressive and creative endeavors. T Students must be available for Synchronous sessions on the following dates: Thursday May 25 -- 7-8PM Thursday June 1 -- 1-2PM, or 7-8PM Thursday June 15 -- 1-2PM, or 7-8PM Thursday June 29 -- 1-2PM, or 7-8PM
Intro to the Theatrical Experience, THTR 100, TBA, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, Mann, Summer Session A, ONLINE
THTR 394: Internship in Theatre Session: A Instructor: Lee Keenan ONLINE
Theatre students complete a semester-long internship providing an opportunity to use their technical, research or organization skills in a professional setting. Students must complete and reflect upon 50 hours of internship experience per credit hour that is pre-approved by the Department of Fine and Performing Arts. Department Permission Required. No more than 6 credit hours of Internship of Fieldwork may e applied to the major. Outcome: Students gain professional experience working at a theatrical organization while reflecting on their work experience and applying theories and techniques acquired from their theatre courses.
Internship in Theatre, THTR 394, TBA, cas, Theatre, Lee Keenan, Summer Session A, ONLINE
THTR 397: Fieldwork in Chicago - Theatre Session: A, B Instructor: Keenan ONLINE
Variable credit (1-6 hours) given for performances or projects undertaken with professional theatre organizations outside the university. Students keep a journal and write evaluative papers. Permission of the Department of Fine and Performing Arts Required. Repeatable for up to 6 credit hours, however no more than 6 credit hours of Internship or Fieldwork can be applied towards the major. Outcome: Specific outcomes and credit hours assigned to be determined by the student in consultation with the Director of Theatre and the project supervisor.
Fieldwork in Chicago - Theatre , THTR 397, TBA, cas, Theatre, Keenan, Summer Session A, B, ONLINE
THTR 399: Independent Study Session: A, B Instructor: Lee Keenan ONLINE
Independent study projects may be of various kinds and in any recognized area of the theatre arts. Such projects should be done under the close supervision of a theatre faculty member.
Independent Study, THTR 399, TBA, cas, Theatre , Lee Keenan, Summer Session A, B, ONLINE
UCLR 100: Interpreting Literature Session: C Instructor: Marbais ONLINE
This class will be a prerequisite for all second tier literature courses, as designated by each department. The foundational course of literary studies will require students to read closely and analyze carefully a representative variety of prose, poetry, and drama, master key literary and critical term, and explore a variety of core critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature. Only one section of UCLR 100, UCLR 100C, UCLR 100E, or UCLR 100M may be taken for credit as an undergraduate.
Interpreting Literature, UCLR 100, TBA, scps, SCPS, Marbais, Summer Session C, ONLINE
UCLR 100C: Interpreting Literature--Classical Studies Session: A Instructor: Livermore LSC
The foundational course of literary studies requires students to read closely and analyze carefully a representative variety of prose, poetry, and drama, master key literary and critical terms, and explore a variety of core critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature. Sections taught by faculty in the Department of Classical Studies focus on the literature of the Greek and Roman worlds in English translation. Readings will include selections from Homer’s Odyssey, Greek tragedy, speeches of Cicero, and the letters of Pliny the Younger.
Interpreting Literature--Classical Studies, UCLR 100C, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Classical Studies, Livermore, Summer Session A, LSC
UCLR 100E: Interpreting Literature - English Session: A Instructor: Bayley ONLINE
UCLR 100E-001 #1702 is an ONLINE class. This is a foundational course that explores a variety of critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature. In particular, we will be looking at the concepts of vulnerability and death and dying. We will discuss how these concepts are depicted in a number of different poems, plays and short stories. These topics are often difficult topics to discuss and yet, they are inevitable realities in each of our lives. Thus, we will use texts, by a number of different American authors such as Mary Oliver, Annie Proulx, Moises Kaufman, Essex Hemphill and more. The method of assessment will include classroom participation, asynchronous writings, and a final.
Interpreting Literature - English , UCLR 100E, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, English, Bayley, Summer Session A, ONLINE
UCLR 100E: Interpreting Literature - English (Horror in Fiction, Drama, and Poetry) Session: B Instructor: Kessel ONLINE
UCLR 100E-002 #2385 is being taught in person on the LSC. Horror in Fiction, Drama, and Poetry Most of us have experienced the pleasure of a good scary story. We love to feel spine-tingling chills while sitting in the comfort of familiar surroundings. We might wonder, especially in recent times, why such stories bring us pleasure in a world that seems to have more than enough real disquietude, horror, and terror in it. In this course we will explore some of the scariest fiction, drama, and poetry ever written! We will read short fiction works spanning the history of this genre, beginning with a chapter from Homer¿s Odyssey and some Grimm¿s fairy tales, traveling through the gothic traditions represented by Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, H. P. Lovecraft, Shirley Jackson, Joyce Carol Oates, Stephen King, Neil Gaiman, and others. We will delve into drama through some truly terrifying horror movies. And we will see that even poetry has its place in the horror genre. Course requirements: consistent attendance and participation, regular quizzes, and a final exam
Interpreting Literature - English (Horror in Fiction, Drama, and Poetry), UCLR 100E, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, English, Kessel, Summer Session B, ONLINE
UCLR 100M: Interpreting Literature: China Through Film & Literature Session: Early Instructor: Chen ONLINE
This foundational class will require students to read closely and analyze carefully a representative variety of prose, poetry, and drama. It will be a prerequisite for all second tier literature courses, as designated by each department.
Interpreting Literature: China Through Film & Literature, UCLR 100M, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Chen, Summer Session Early, ONLINE
UCLR 100M: Interpreting Literature - Modern Langs&Literatures Session: B Instructor: Abbadi LSC
This foundational class will require students to read closely and analyze carefully a representative variety of prose, poetry, and drama. It will be a prerequisite for all second tier literature courses, as designated by each department. Students will master key literary and critical terms, and explore a variety of core critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature.
Interpreting Literature - Modern Langs&Literatures, UCLR 100M, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Abbadi, Summer Session B, LSC
UCWR 110: Writing Responsibly Session: A Instructor: Stogner ONLINE
Writing Responsibly instructs students in the conventions of academic writing. Students will develop flexible strategies for generating, revising, editing their writing and will receive instruction in how to write clear, error free prose. Students will learn responsibility to their readers, responsibility to their sources, and responsibility to themselves as writers.
Writing Responsibly, UCWR 110, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, English, Stogner, Summer Session A, ONLINE
UCWR 110: Writing Responsibly Session: B Instructor: Hovey LSC
The course instructs students in the conventions of academic writing and research. Students will learn strategies for process-based drafting, research, and argumentation, develop flexible strategies for generating, revising, and editing their writing, and will receive instruction on how to write clear, error-free prose. The course will cover critical reading and thinking, rhetorical argumentation, the recursive writing-process, and information/research literacies. After completing the course, students will be able to write clearly and effectively, tailoring writing and rhetorical strategies to the goals and audience of a given project.
Writing Responsibly, UCWR 110, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, English, Hovey, Summer Session B, LSC
UCWR 110: Writing Responsibly Session: C Instructor: Rydel ONLINE
Writing Responsibly instructs students in the conventions of academic writing. Students will develop flexible strategies for generating, revising, editing their writing and will receive instruction in how to write clear, error free prose. Students will learn responsibility to their readers, responsibility to their sources, and responsibility to themselves as writers.
Writing Responsibly, UCWR 110, TBA, scps, SCPS, Rydel, Summer Session C, ONLINE
WSGS 101: Introduction to Women's Studies and Gender Studies Session: A Instructor: Lombardi-Diop ONLINE
This is an introduction to the interdisciplinary fields of both Women's Studies and Gender Studies which explore the ways that sex and gender manifest themselves in social, cultural, and political arenas. It draws upon scholarship in women's studies, masculinities studies, and queer studies which themselves draw upon a variety of intellectual perspectives, including historical, psychological, rhetorical, sociological, literary, and biological.
Introduction to Women's Studies and Gender Studies, WSGS 101, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Women's Studies Gender Studies , Lombardi-Diop, Summer Session A, ONLINE
WSGS 388 : Women's Studies Practicum Session: B Instructor: TBA LSC
This supervised field experience uses experiential learning at a wide variety uses experiential learning at a variety of women's political, cultural or educational organization as the basis for learning and refining skills which cab benefit gender equity. Students demonstrate skill proficiency, professional conduct, and systematic reflection on their experience. Students learn about public and private sector responses to women's issues and concerns.
Women's Studies Practicum, WSGS 388 , TBA, cas, Women's Studies Gender Studies, TBA, Summer Session B, LSC
WSGS 390: Dir Readings Women Studies Session: B Instructor: TBA LSC
An independent program of reading and research arranged between the student and the supervising faculty member in the student's major department. Students will complete a final research project integrating their major fields with women's studies. Permission of women's studies director is required.
Dir Readings Women Studies, WSGS 390, TBA, cas, Women's Studies Gender Studies, TBA, Summer Session B, LSC
WSGS 398: Women's Studies Internship Session: B Instructor: TBA LSC
This course uses supervised project-based experiential learning to allow students the opportunity to apply feminist analysis and practical skills to a student-designed project that will be completed within the timeframe of a course term. Students learn application of feminist concepts and principles to pragmatic outcomes; leadership, planning, time management, and assessment skills.
Women's Studies Internship, WSGS 398, TBA, cas, Women's Studies Gender Studies, TBA, Summer Session B, LSC
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