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ACCT 201: Introductory Accounting I Session: A Instructor: TBA
The major emphasis is on the development and reporting of accounting information for use by investors, creditors, and others. The student is required to develop skills in the preparation and use of accounting information and must demonstrate an understanding of the accounting process, and be able to evaluate the impact of estimates, alternative accounting principles, and the limitations of the accounting model on accounting information. Topics include preparation and use of financial statements; the accounting process; and the measurement and reporting of income, assets, liabilities, and owners’ equity. The student will be able to understand the underlying principles, design, concepts, limitations, and the necessity of accounting systems. The student will gain an appreciation of the uses of financial data and financial statements and their impact on business decisions.
Introductory Accounting I, ACCT 201, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Accounting and Business Law, TBA, Summer Session A
ACCT 201: Introductory Accounting I Session: A, B Instructor: TBA
The major emphasis is on the development and reporting of accounting information for use by investors, creditors, and others. The student is required to develop skills in the preparation and use of accounting information and must demonstrate an understanding of the accounting process, and be able to evaluate the impact of estimates, alternative accounting principles, and the limitations of the accounting model on accounting information. Topics include preparation and use of financial statements; the accounting process; and the measurement and reporting of income, assets, liabilities, and owners’ equity. The student will be able to understand the underlying principles, design, concepts, limitations, and the necessity of accounting systems. The student will gain an appreciation of the uses of financial data and financial statements and their impact on business decisions.
Introductory Accounting I, ACCT 201, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Accounting, TBA, Summer Session A, B
ACCT 202: Introductory Accounting II Session: B Instructor: TBA
This course highlights the differences between financial accounting and managerial accounting. The course begins by completing the study of transactions and events affecting financial statements. The cash flow statement is then explored in some detail. Finally, financial statement analysis as traditionally practiced, is considered a capstone for financial accounting. The course then focuses on the use of accounting data by management. Product costing in a manufacturing setting, assigning of costs to objects, learning how costs behave, and the use of accounting data by management in planning operations, controlling operations, and in short term decision making are all investigated. Students will be able to understand the differences between cash and accrual accounting, the use of ratio analysis in investing and managing decisions, the value and importance of identifying and allocating costs, and the methods involved in the budgeting process.
Introductory Accounting II, ACCT 202, TBA, quinlan, Accounting and Business Law, TBA, Summer Session B
ANTH 100: Globalization & Local Cultures Session: A Instructor: Nichols
This course is a study of cultural diversity on a global scale, and provides a comparative perspective on the investigation of humans as cultural and social beings. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the historic and contemporary relationships between cultures and societies, and to understand how cultures change over time.
Globalization & Local Cultures, ANTH 100, TBA, cas, Anthropology, Nichols, Summer Session A
ANTH 100: Globalization & Local Cultures Session: A Instructor: Butler
This course is a study of cultural diversity on a global scale, and provides a comparative perspective on the investigation of humans as cultural and social beings. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the historic and contemporary relationships between cultures and societies, and to understand how cultures change over time.
Globalization & Local Cultures, ANTH 100, Wed, cas, Anthropology, Butler, Summer Session A
ANTH 100: Globalization & Local Cultures Session: B Instructor: Gomberg-Munoz
This course is a study of cultural diversity on a global scale, and provides a comparative perspective on the investigation of humans as cultural and social beings. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the historic and contemporary relationships between cultures and societies, and to understand how cultures change over time.
Globalization & Local Cultures, ANTH 100, TBA, cas, Anthropology, Gomberg-Munoz, Summer Session B
ANTH 101: Human Origins Session: A Instructor: Krueger
This course explores the study of the biological history of the human species from its inception to the establishments of food producing societies. Students will demonstrate understanding of basic biological principles (heredity, physiology, evolutionary mechanisms, ecology) in the context of their application to the human condition, as well as the role of cultural behavior in defining the distinctiveness of that condition.
Human Origins, ANTH 101, TBA, cas, Anthropology, Krueger, Summer Session A
ANTH 101: Human Origins Session: B Instructor: Tomczak
This course explores the study of the biological history of the human species from its inception to the establishments of food producing societies. Students will demonstrate understanding of basic biological principles (heredity, physiology, evolutionary mechanisms, ecology) in the context of their application to the human condition, as well as the role of cultural behavior in defining the distinctiveness of that condition.
Human Origins, ANTH 101, TBA, cas, Anthropology, Tomczak, Summer Session B
ANTH 396: Internship in Anthropology Session: A, B Instructor: TBA
This course is designed to enhance student engagement by facilitating internship experiences within the department or in museums, service-oriented organizations, businesses, and non-profit organizations. Experiential learning is combined with rigorous academic work. This course may serve, if appropriate, as a capstone experience. Students will produce a research paper, project, proposal, or assessed piece that reflects the application and integration of anthropological theory, methods, or techniques, to the internship experience.
Internship in Anthropology, ANTH 396, TBA, cas, Anthropology, TBA, Summer Session A, B
ANTH 397: Directed Readings in Anthropology Session: A, B Instructor: TBA
Individualized readings in varied topics within anthropology. Students will gain detailed knowledge of the specific topic of their directed readings subject.
Directed Readings in Anthropology, ANTH 397, TBA, cas, Anthropology, TBA, Summer Session A, B
ANTH 398: Independent Study in Anthropology Session: A, B Instructor: TBA
Individualized program of independent study of anthropological problems and/or issues. Students will gain detailed knowledge of the specific study program they undertake.
Independent Study in Anthropology, ANTH 398, TBA, cas, Anthropology, TBA, Summer Session A, B
ANTH 399: Fieldwork in Anthropology Session: A, B Instructor: TBA
Application of anthropological concepts and methods to a specific field situation under the supervision of a faculty member. Students will learn field techniques and data recovery and analysis techniques pertinent to the specific nature of their field experience.
Fieldwork in Anthropology, ANTH 399, TBA, cas, Anthropology, TBA, Summer Session A, B
BIOL 101: General Biology I Session: A Instructor: Diggs
Fundamental principles of biology including basic chemistry, cell structure and function, energy transformations, evolutionary theory, cellular reproduction and principles of genetics.
General Biology I, BIOL 101, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Diggs, Summer Session A
BIOL 101: General Biology I Session: A Instructor: Diggs
Fundamental principles of biology including basic chemistry, cell structure and function, energy transformations, evolutionary theory, cellular reproduction and principles of genetics.
General Biology I, BIOL 101, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Diggs, Summer Session A
BIOL 102: General Biology II Session: B Instructor: Kroll
Fundamental principles of biology including diversity of life, environmental and biological diversity, population and community ecology, study of plant structure and function, reproduction and controlling plant growth and development, comparative animal organ systems and mechanism of cell communication.
General Biology II, BIOL 102, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Kroll, Summer Session B
BIOL 111: General Biology I Lab Session: A Instructor: Helfgott
Complements the lecture material through observation, experimentation, and when appropriate, dissection of representative organisms. Observations will include physical and chemical phenomena as well as the anatomy and physiology of selected organisms. The organisms to be studied will be selected from the kingdoms monera, protista, fungi, plantae and animalia.
General Biology I Lab, BIOL 111, Tue, Thurs, cas, Biology, Helfgott, Summer Session A
BIOL 112: General Biology Lab II Session: B Instructor: Franks
Complements the lecture material through observation, experimentation, and when appropriate, dissection of representative organisms. Observations will include physical and chemical phenomena as well as the anatomy and physiology of selected organisms. The organisms to be studied will be selected from the kingdoms monera, protista, fungi, plantae and animalia.
General Biology Lab II, BIOL 112, Tue, Thurs, cas, Biology, Franks, Summer Session B
BIOL 112: General Biology II Lab Session: B Instructor: Franks
Complements the lecture material through observation, experimentation, and when appropriate, dissection of representative organisms. Observations will include physical and chemical phenomena as well as the anatomy and physiology of selected organisms. The organisms to be studied will be selected from the kingdoms monera, protista, fungi, plantae and animalia.
General Biology II Lab, BIOL 112, Tue, Thurs, cas, Biology, Franks, Summer Session B
BIOL 242 (lab required): Human Structure & Function I Session: A Instructor: Hayes
This class includes lecture, laboratory, and demonstrations and focuses on organization of the human body from the cellular to the organismal level. Anatomy of body systems and their physiology related to support and movement (integumentary, skeletal and muscular systems), and integration and control (nervous and endocrine systems). Dissection of representative organs is required. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of human anatomy at the microscopic and gross levels. They will be able to correlate structure and function and will have a firm understanding of the organizing principle of human physiology, homeostasis, and explain the role of the nervous and endocrine systems in its maintenance.
Human Structure & Function I, BIOL 242 (lab required), Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Hayes, Summer Session A
BIOL 242 Lab: Human Structure & Function I Lab Session: A Instructor: Diggs
This class includes lecture, laboratory, and demonstrations and focuses on organization of the human body from the cellular to the organismal level. Anatomy of body systems and their physiology related to support and movement (integumentary, skeletal and muscular systems), and integration and control (nervous and endocrine systems). Dissection of representative organs is required. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of human anatomy at the microscopic and gross levels. They will be able to correlate structure and function and will have a firm understanding of the organizing principle of human physiology, homeostasis, and explain the role of the nervous and endocrine systems in its maintenance.
Human Structure & Function I Lab, BIOL 242 Lab, Mon, Wed, cas, Biology, Diggs, Summer Session A
BIOL 243: Human Structure & Function II Session: B Instructor: Hayes
This class includes lecture, laboratory ,and demonstrations. A continuation of BIOL 242. Anatomy of body systems and their physiology related to regulation and maintenance (cardiovascular, lymphatic respiratory, digestive and urinary systems), and reproduction and development (male and female reproductive systems.) Dissection of representative organs is required. Students will be able to demonstrate a comprehensive integrated knowledge and understanding of human anatomy and physiology at all levels.
Human Structure & Function II, BIOL 243, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Hayes, Summer Session B
BIOL 243 Lab: Human Structure & Function II Lab Session: B Instructor: Duffie
This class includes lecture, laboratory ,and demonstrations. A continuation of BIOL 242. Anatomy of body systems and their physiology related to regulation and maintenance (cardiovascular, lymphatic respiratory, digestive and urinary systems), and reproduction and development (male and female reproductive systems.) Dissection of representative organs is required. Students will be able to demonstrate a comprehensive integrated knowledge and understanding of human anatomy and physiology at all levels.
Human Structure & Function II Lab, BIOL 243 Lab, Tue, Thurs, cas, Biology, Duffie, Summer Session B
BIOL251: Cell Biology Session: A Instructor: Kanzok
Basic molecular and cellular studies of living organisms, emphasizing the relationships between subcellular structures and biochemical and physiological functions of cells.
Cell Biology, BIOL251, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Biology, Kanzok, Summer Session A
BIOL 251: Cell Biology Session: B Instructor: Dale
Basic molecular and cellular studies of living organisms, emphasizing the relationships between subcellular structures and biochemical and physiological functions of cells.
Cell Biology, BIOL 251, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Dale, Summer Session B
BIOL 265: Ecology Session: A Instructor: Sines
Relationships of organisms to their environment and to each other at the organismal, population and community levels.
Ecology, BIOL 265, TBA, cas, Biology, Sines, Summer Session A
BIOL 265: Ecology Session: B Instructor: Kroll
Relationships of organisms to their environment and to each other at the organismal, population and community levels.
Ecology, BIOL 265, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Kroll, Summer Session B
BIOL 282: Genetics Session: A Instructor: Buldak
This course surveys principles and processes of genetic inheritance, gene expression, molecular biology, developmental, quantitative, population, and evolutionary genetics. Students will develop knowledge and awareness of the genetic bases of modern biology. They will understand Mendelian principles of inheritance, chromosome and DNA structure and replication, gene expression, molecular biology, genetic bases of development, and other biological processes, and quantitative, population and evolutionary genetics.
Genetics, BIOL 282, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Buldak, Summer Session A
BIOL 282: Genetics Session: B Instructor: Osenkowski
This course surveys principles and processes of genetic inheritance, gene expression, molecular biology, developmental, quantitative, population, and evolutionary genetics. Students will develop knowledge and awareness of the genetic bases of modern biology. They will understand Mendelian principles of inheritance, chromosome and DNA structure and replication, gene expression, molecular biology, genetic bases of development, and other biological processes, and quantitative, population and evolutionary genetics.
Genetics, BIOL 282, TBA, cas, Biology, Osenkowski, Summer Session B
BIOL 283: Genetics Laboratory Session: A Instructor: Buldak
Experiments and demonstrations to illustrate chromosomal structures and transmission, molecular biology, gene linkage, gene frequencies and variation. Students will develop technical skills and ability to interpret data from a variety of types of genetics experiments.
Genetics Laboratory, BIOL 283, Tue, Thurs, cas, Biology, Buldak, Summer Session A
BIOL 296: Introduction to Research Session: A, Full Instructor: TBA
Students will begin reading the literature in the field of their mentor, conduct experiments designed by the mentor, and give a presentation on their work or studies, in preparation for upper level undergraduate research. Learning Outcome: Students will develop critical reading skills and become familiar with basic lab techniques in the area of their mentor.
Introduction to Research , BIOL 296, TBA, Biology , TBA, Summer Session A, Full
BIOL 302: General Microbiology Lab Session: A Instructor: Rizert
In a lecture/laboratory combination, this course covers the fundamental concepts of microbial life, physiology, and metabolism. Students will learn the differences between the three domains of life and will comprehend the biochemistry, morphology, growth characteristics, structure, and ecology of microbes.
General Microbiology Lab, BIOL 302, Tue, Thurs, cas, Biology, Rizert, Summer Session A
BIOL 302: General Microbiology Lecture Session: A Instructor: Rizert
In a lecture/laboratory combination, this course covers the fundamental concepts of microbial life, physiology, and metabolism. Students will learn the differences between the three domains of life and will comprehend the biochemistry, morphology, growth characteristics, structure, and ecology of microbes.
General Microbiology Lecture, BIOL 302, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Rizert, Summer Session A
BIOL 304: Intro to Developmental Biology Session: B Instructor: Dale
The analysis of developmental processes such as; fertilization, embryonic cleavage, cell determination and cell differentiation in selected species. Emphasis will be on experiments that reveal how these processes are controlled at the molecular and cellular levels. Outcome: Students will become familiar with a wide range of developmental biology principles and experimental approaches that led to important discoveries, gain an appreciation of the scientific method, and learn about the goals of modern developmental biology research.
Intro to Developmental Biology, BIOL 304, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Dale, Summer Session B
BIOL 317: Models of Human Disease Session: B Instructor: Osenkowski
This course explores approaches used to study human diseases from in vitro to in vivo levels and examines their strengths and weaknesses. Discussions will cover historical experiments and cutting-edge research to learn about the techniques used to generate data and how to interpret the results. Students will gain knowledge about human diseases and techniques used to model aspects of those diseases in the laboratory.
Models of Human Disease, BIOL 317, TBA, cas, Biology, Osenkowski, Summer Session B
BIOL 328: Conservation Biology Session: B Instructor: Milanovich
This course explores species diversity, natural and human induced extinctions, environmental ethics, and conservation practices being developed at the population, community, and ecosystem levels. Students will be able to describe conservation strategies being used by institutions around the world and understand the ecological theory that supports those strategies.
Conservation Biology, BIOL 328, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Biology, Milanovich, Summer Session B
BSAD 220: Career Preparation Session: Early Instructor: Ries
Internship and Career Preparation introduce students to the critical skills required for successful career development and job search navigation. Students will learn about career development; develop job/internship search skills; establish a job/internship search action plan and begin to become oriented to employer research. Topics addressed will include resume/job search correspondence; interviewing skills; network building; career & employer research and career development resource building.
Career Preparation, BSAD 220, TBA, quinlan, Business Administration, Ries, Summer Session Early
BSAD 300: Business Internship Session: A, B Instructor: TBA
Business Internship for elective credit is for SBA students, and non-SBA students pursing a minor in the School of Business, who wish to earn academic, elective credit while pursuing an internship opportunity. The course is variable credit from 1-3 hours and may be repeated for credit for a total of 3 earned hours. BSAD 300 is not a course for credit in any SBA major or minor
Business Internship, BSAD 300, TBA, Business Administration, TBA, Summer Session A, B
BSAD 343: Business Analytics Session: A, B Instructor: TBA
Business Internship connects academic learning with the internship experience. Students will be challenged to analyze the theory and practices from the world of work that impact the ethics of leading, interpersonal and organizational dynamics, and competent work place contributions required for success in the modern business world. Concepts associated with internship/experiential learning as related to career development will be addressed. Students must be working in an internship during the term of enrollment into BSAD 351.
Business Analytics, BSAD 343, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Business Administration, TBA, Summer Session A, B
BSAD 351: Business Internship - Engaged Learning Session: C Instructor: TBD
Business Internship connects academic learning with the internship experience. Students will be challenged to analyze the theory and practices from the world of work that impact the ethics of leading, interpersonal and organizational dynamics, and competent work place contributions required for success in the modern business world. Concepts associated with internship/experiential learning as related to career development will be addressed. Students must be working in an internship during the term of enrollment into BSAD 351.
Business Internship - Engaged Learning, BSAD 351, TBA, quinlan, Business Administration, TBD, Summer Session C
CHEM 101: General Chemistry A Session: Full Instructor: Daubenmire
This lecture and discussion deals with the development of basic chemical principles. Topics include atomic and molecular structures, states of matter, energetics and stoichiometry of reactions. (For non-chemistry majors and students in the B.A. chemistry program.)
General Chemistry A, CHEM 101, TBA, cas, Chemistry, Daubenmire, Summer Session Full
CHEM 101: General Chemistry A Session: A, Full Instructor: Greene-Johnson
This lecture and discussion deals with the development of basic chemical principles. Topics include atomic and molecular structures, states of matter, energetics and stoichiometry of reactions. (For non-chemistry majors and students in the B.A. chemistry program.)
General Chemistry A, CHEM 101, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Greene-Johnson, Summer Session A, Full
CHEM 101: General Chemistry A Session: A Instructor: Lin
This lecture and discussion deals with the development of basic chemical principles. Topics include atomic and molecular structures, states of matter, energetics and stoichiometry of reactions. (For non-chemistry majors and students in the B.A. chemistry program.)
General Chemistry A, CHEM 101, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Lin, Summer Session A
CHEM 102: General Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: Daubenmire
This lecture and discussion is a continuation of General Chemistry A. Topics include equilibrium systems, periodic properties and descriptive chemistry.
General Chemistry B, CHEM 102, TBA, cas, Chemistry, Daubenmire, Summer Session B
CHEM 102: General Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: Naleway
This lecture and discussion is a continuation of General Chemistry A. Topics include equilibrium systems, periodic properties and descriptive chemistry.
General Chemistry B, CHEM 102, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Naleway, Summer Session B
CHEM 102: General Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: Mahaffey
This lecture and discussion is a continuation of General Chemistry A. Topics include equilibrium systems, periodic properties and descriptive chemistry.
General Chemistry B, CHEM 102, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Chemistry, Mahaffey, Summer Session B
CHEM 102: General Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: Mahaffey
This lecture and discussion is a continuation of General Chemistry A. Topics include equilibrium systems, periodic properties and descriptive chemistry.
General Chemistry B, CHEM 102, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Chemistry, Mahaffey, Summer Session B
CHEM 102: General Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: Klinger
This lecture and discussion is a continuation of General Chemistry A. Topics include equilibrium systems, periodic properties and descriptive chemistry.
General Chemistry B, CHEM 102, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Klinger, Summer Session B
CHEM 111: General Chemistry Lab A Session: A Instructor: Binaku
This laboratory course experimentally illustrates the topics covered in the General Chemistry A.
General Chemistry Lab A, CHEM 111, Tue, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Binaku, Summer Session A
CHEM 112: General Chemistry Lab B Session: B Instructor: Pecak
This laboratory course experimentally illustrates the topics covered in the General Chemistry B lecture.
General Chemistry Lab B, CHEM 112, Tue, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Pecak, Summer Session B
CHEM 112: General Chemistry Lab B Session: B Instructor: Pecak
This laboratory course experimentally illustrates the topics covered in the General Chemistry B lecture.
General Chemistry Lab B, CHEM 112, Tue, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Pecak, Summer Session B
CHEM 112: General Chemistry Lab B Session: B Instructor: Lin
This laboratory course experimentally illustrates the topics covered in the General Chemistry B lecture.
General Chemistry Lab B, CHEM 112, Mon, Wed, cas, Chemistry, Lin, Summer Session B
CHEM 212: Quantitative Analysis Session: A Instructor: Binaku
This lecture course provides an introduction to modern analytical quantitative chemistry. Topics include chemical equilibrium, statistical analysis of data as well as modern and classical methods of chemical analysis.
Quantitative Analysis, CHEM 212, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Binaku, Summer Session A
CHEM 223: Organic Chemistry A Session: A Instructor: Baser
Lecture and discussion. First semester of a two semester sequence for non-chemistry majors. A survey of topics including stereochemistry, spectroscopy and fundamental concepts of organic chemistry. Nomenclature, properties and syntheses of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers.
Organic Chemistry A, CHEM 223, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Baser, Summer Session A
CHEM 223: Organic Chemistry A Session: A Instructor: Basner
Lecture and discussion. First semester of a two semester sequence for non-chemistry majors. A survey of topics including stereochemistry, spectroscopy and fundamental concepts of organic chemistry. Nomenclature, properties and syntheses of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers.
Organic Chemistry A, CHEM 223, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Basner, Summer Session A
CHEM 223: Organic Chemistry A Session: A Instructor: Helquist
Lecture and discussion. First semester of a two semester sequence for non-chemistry majors. A survey of topics including stereochemistry, spectroscopy and fundamental concepts of organic chemistry. Nomenclature, properties and syntheses of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers.
Organic Chemistry A, CHEM 223, TBA, cas, Chemistry, Helquist, Summer Session A
CHEM 223: Organic Chemistry A Session: A Instructor: May
Lecture and discussion. First semester of a two semester sequence for non-chemistry majors. A survey of topics including stereochemistry, spectroscopy and fundamental concepts of organic chemistry. Nomenclature, properties and syntheses of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers.
Organic Chemistry A, CHEM 223, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, May, Summer Session A
CHEM 224: Organic Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: Szpunar
Continuation of Organic Chemistry A. Organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. For non-chemistry majors.
Organic Chemistry B, CHEM 224, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Szpunar, Summer Session B
CHEM 224: Organic Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: Szpunar
Continuation of Organic Chemistry A. Organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. For non-chemistry majors.
Organic Chemistry B, CHEM 224, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Szpunar, Summer Session B
CHEM 224: Organic Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: Osner
Continuation of Organic Chemistry A. Organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. For non-chemistry majors.
Organic Chemistry B, CHEM 224, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Osner, Summer Session B
CHEM 224: Organic Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: Osner
Continuation of Organic Chemistry A. Organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. For non-chemistry majors.
Organic Chemistry B, CHEM 224, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Osner, Summer Session B
CHEM 224: Organic Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: May
Continuation of Organic Chemistry A. Organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. For non-chemistry majors.
Organic Chemistry B, CHEM 224, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, May, Summer Session B
CHEM 224: Organic Chemistry B Session: B Instructor: May
Continuation of Organic Chemistry A. Organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. For non-chemistry majors.
Organic Chemistry B, CHEM 224, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, May, Summer Session B
CHEM 225: Organic Chemistry Lab A Session: A Instructor: Thomas
A laboratory course designed to illustrate, through experiments, the topics correspondingly covered in Organic Chemistry A. The experiments acquaint students with the laboratory practices and techniques of organic chemistry, with several involving preparation of known organic compounds. For non-chemistry majors.
Organic Chemistry Lab A, CHEM 225, Tue, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Thomas, Summer Session A
CHEM 225: Organic Chemistry Lab A Session: A Instructor: Thomas
A laboratory course designed to illustrate, through experiments, the topics correspondingly covered in Organic Chemistry A. The experiments acquaint students with the laboratory practices and techniques of organic chemistry, with several involving preparation of known organic compounds. For non-chemistry majors.
Organic Chemistry Lab A, CHEM 225, Tue, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Thomas, Summer Session A
CHEM 226: Organic Chemistry Lab B Session: B Instructor: Eisenberg
A laboratory course to illustrate, through experiments, certain topics covered in Organic Chemistry B. The major portion of the laboratory work involves the identification of several relatively simple organic compounds. For non- chemistry majors.
Organic Chemistry Lab B, CHEM 226, Tue, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Eisenberg, Summer Session B
CHEM 226: Organic Chemistry Lab B Session: B Instructor: Eisenberg
A laboratory course to illustrate, through experiments, certain topics covered in Organic Chemistry B. The major portion of the laboratory work involves the identification of several relatively simple organic compounds. For non- chemistry majors.
Organic Chemistry Lab B, CHEM 226, Tue, Thurs, cas, Chemistry, Eisenberg, Summer Session B
CHEM 361: Principles of Biochemistry Session: A Instructor: Pine
This lecture-based class focuses on the structural-functional relationships of proteins, nucleic acids and cell membranes, and metabolic pathways.
Principles of Biochemistry, CHEM 361, Mon, Wed, Fri, cas, Chemistry, Pine, Summer Session A
CHEM 361: Principles of Biochemistry Session: A Instructor: Pine
This lecture-based class focuses on the structural-functional relationships of proteins, nucleic acids and cell membranes, and metabolic pathways.
Principles of Biochemistry, CHEM 361, TBA, cas, Chemistry, Pine, Summer Session A
CIEP 360: Interdisciplinary Workshop: Culture and Identity in TLLSC 140, 150, 160 Session: Full
The modules in Sequence 2 explore how the school is itself a community and how the organization and environment of a school influence student learning. This sequence builds off of Sequence 1's exploration of the local communities that schools are situated in. The sequence addresses TLLSC Enduring Understandings 1, 3, 7, and 9. Outcomes: TLSC 140: Teaching, Learning and Leading for Social Justice This module builds on candidates' initial explorations of diverse learning environments and continues to develop candidates' understanding of the School of Education's mission of professionalism in service of social justice and the core tenets of culturally responsive pedagogy. TLSC 150: Constructive Learning Environments for Diverse Students This module deepens teacher candidates' introduction to learning and development through consideration of the importance of healthy learning environments TLSC 160: Analyzing Culturally Responsive Classroom Instruction This module builds on candidates' initial explorations of learning and the core tenets of culturally responsive pedagogy as candidates are introduced to backward design and Universal Design for Learning.
Interdisciplinary Workshop: Culture and Identity in TLLSC 140, 150, 160, CIEP 360, TBA, education, Curriculum and Instruction, Educational Psychology, Summer Session Full
CIEP 398: Independent Study Session: A, B Instructor: TBA
Independent Study, CIEP 398, TBA, Curriculum & Instruction, Educational Psychology, TBA, Summer Session A, B
CIEP 401: The Exceptional Child Session: A, B Instructor: TBA
This course is designed to provide a psychological and educational examination of exceptionality as related to school- age children and youth. Outcome: Students will articulate defining characteristics of a range of disabilities as well as knowledge of a range of educational modifications made for students with special needs.
The Exceptional Child, CIEP 401, TBA, education, Curriculum & Instruction, Educational Psychology, TBA, Summer Session A, B
CIEP 413: Psychopath & School Mental Health Session: A
The purpose of this course is to develop a working knowledge of childhood/adolescent psychopathology from multiple theoretical perspectives. The interactions of individuals, families, communities, schools and mental health providers in either etiology and/or treatment planning will be considered. Outcome: Students will gain knowledge of child/adolescent psychopathology in terms of diagnosis, prevention and intervention
Psychopath & School Mental Health, CIEP 413, TBA, education, Curriculum & Instruction, Educational Psychology, Summer Session A
CIEP 425: Classroom Assessment Session: B
This course addresses the purposes, methods, creation, and uses of classroom assessment. Students will interpret, revise, and construct various assessments and devise rubrics that align with school, state, and district standards as well as examine assessment products to plan instruction. Outcome: Students will be able to: 1) Understand various purposes, theories, and components of assessment; 2) Develop a unit assessment system integrating standards, assessment, curriculum, and instruction; 3) Develop and articulate an appropriate and clear philosophy of assessment.
Classroom Assessment, CIEP 425, TBA, education, Curriculum, Instruction & Education Psychology, Summer Session B
CIEP 432: Three Tier Prevention: Secondary and Tertiary Supports Session: A Instructor: TBA
This course will focus on the use of secondary and tertiary supports/interventions to enhance the capacity of schools, families, and communities to design effective environments that improve the fit or link between research-validated practices and the environments in which teaching and learning occurs. Outcome: Candidates will learn skills to assist them in designing and implementing evidenced-based behavior interventions to targeted groups or individuals that improve lifestyle results (personal, health, social, family, work, recreation) for all children and youth by making problem behavior less effective, efficient, and relevant , and desired behavior more functional.
Three Tier Prevention: Secondary and Tertiary Supports, CIEP 432, TBA, education, Curriculum, Instruction & Education Psychology, TBA, Summer Session A
CIEP 471: Theoretical Foundations of ESL-Bilingual Education Session: B
This course introduces the integral theoretical, historical, political frameworks and ideological constructs that shape the contemporary educational practices for culturally and linguistically diverse students. Content delves into key principles, policies, and practices of language education, including the various models of bilingual education, English as a second language (ESL), English as a foreign language (EFL), and sheltered content instruction. The course builds background of language acquisition theories, key legal precedents, and educational and language policies that influence school programming, assessment, instruction, teaching, and learning. Outcome: Participants will explain how students develop and maintain languages, describe the research basis for bilingual education, and demonstrate how various school stakeholders implement language policies and programs with bilingual students.
Theoretical Foundations of ESL-Bilingual Education, CIEP 471, TBA, education, Curriculum & Instruction, Educational Psychology, Summer Session B
CIEP 473: Instructional Leadership for Multicultural Schools Session: B Instructor: TBA
This course focuses on building capacity in schools to promote the learning, development, and achievement of students from diverse linguistic, cultural, and racial backgrounds, particularly framed within the context of a society faced with issues of poverty, discrimination, racism, and sexism. The course probes important topics such as teacher expectations, student identity construction, and utilization of the rich resources that students bring to educational settings from their homes and communities. Outcomes: Participants will critically analyze their school settings for issues of race, class, culture, language, and gender and then design professional development efforts to promote change with teachers, leaders, families, and communities.
Instructional Leadership for Multicultural Schools, CIEP 473, TBA, education, Curriculum & Instruction, Educational Psychology, TBA, Summer Session B
CIEP 474: Assessment of Bilingual Students Session: A
This course prepares educators to utilize assessment to inform classroom instruction, specifically focused on authentic assessment oflanguage and content. Targeting educators of bilingual students, the course emphasizes theoretical and practical study of instruments and procedures for assessing culturally and linguistically diverse students. Educators collect data and make instructional decisions based on students' abilities in English and other languages, which involves distinguishing between learning exceptionality and second language acquisition. Outcome: Participants will design and utilize formal and informal methods of evaluation to assess students' social, emotional, cultural, linguistic, and academic development and achievement, including critical analyses of existing assessment tools for validity, reliability, and bias.
Assessment of Bilingual Students, CIEP 474, Mon, Wed, education, Curriculum & Instruction, Educational Psychology, Summer Session A
CIEP 484: Biological Foundations: Behav Sch Session: B
Students will learn basic biological foundations of behavior as they relate to assessment and intervention of students in school settings. Outcome: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the biological basis for behavior and how these issues relate to academic and behavioral challenges faced in schools.
Biological Foundations: Behav Sch, CIEP 484, TBA, education, Curriculum & Instruction, Educational Psychology, Summer Session B
CIEP 498: Independent Study Session: A, B
Independent Study, CIEP 498, TBA, education, Curriculum & Instruction, Educational Psychology, Summer Session A, B
CIEP 499: Directed Research Session: A, B
Directed Research, CIEP 499, TBA, education, Curriculum & Instruction, Educational Psychology, Summer Session A, B
CIEP 504: Applied Linguistics for Teachers Session: B
This course emphasizes the complex and dynamic role of language in teaching and learning, including implications for effective policy and practice in culturally and linguistically diverse classrooms. The course prompts participants to engage in applied linguistics research to solve problems of practice in the teaching of bilingual students. Outcome: Participants will apply in-depth understandings of language acquisition and development to make informed decisions in practice with the goal to support the learning and language development of linguistically diverse students.
Applied Linguistics for Teachers, CIEP 504, TBA, education, Curriculum & Instruction, Educational Psychology, Summer Session B
CIEP 506: English Language Learning Practicum Session: A
The practicum experience serves to integrate learning from across the Masters program within authentic teaching and learning environments spanning PK-20 settings. The course involves formal observation, support, and evaluation during classroom teaching with bilingual students, guided by specific practicum assignments that center on backward design via data analysis, classroom environment, and instructional units of study. Outcome: Participants will demonstrate competence, effectiveness, and responsiveness in daily classroom practice with bilingual students.
English Language Learning Practicum, CIEP 506, TBA, education, Curriculum & Instruction, Educational Psychology, Summer Session A
CIEP 541: Sem: Curriculum Issues Session: B
In this course students will study one aspect of current literature in the field of curriculum with intensity. Outcome: Students will be able to apply the current research in an advanced curriculum situation. Students will be cognizant of current areas of curriculum research and be able to find references electronically.
Sem: Curriculum Issues, CIEP 541, Mon, Wed, education, Curriculum & Instruction, Educational Psychology, Summer Session B
CIEP 545: Adv Sys Consultation & School Psychology Supervision Session: A
Adv Sys Consultation & School Psychology Supervision, CIEP 545, TBA, education, Curriculum & Instruction, Educational Psychology, Summer Session A
CIEP 556: Sem: Problem Solving Thinking & Creativity
This course focuses on the knowledge base related to human problem-solving, thinking and creating through the presentation of a variety of approaches as they relate to instructional design. Outcome: Students will demonstrate an advanced theoretical understanding of current models of human problem-solving, thinking and creativity along with an understanding of how these approaches drive instructional interventions
Sem: Problem Solving Thinking & Creativity, CIEP 556, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, Fri, education, Curriculum & Instruction, Educational Psychology,
CIEP 586: Doctoral Internship: School Psychology Session: A
In collaboration with ISPIC and APPIC, the student will complete an advanced doctoral level 12 month supervised internship of 2000 hours. Outcome: Students will follow a prescribed doctoral level internship plan to show advanced competencies as a school psychologist under the direction of a licensed clinical psychologist and certified school psychologist.
Doctoral Internship: School Psychology, CIEP 586, education, Curriculum & Instruction, Educational Psychology, Summer Session A
CIEP 600: Dissertation Supervision Session: A
To be registered for while working on an approved dissertation project.
Dissertation Supervision, CIEP 600, education, Curriculum & Instruction, Educational Psychology, Summer Session A
CJC 201: Theories of Criminal Behavior Session: A Instructor: Donner
This course will provide a detailed examination of past and present theories of criminal behavior, placing them in a socio-historical context and exploring their policy and practical implications. Outcomes: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of how the specific theories of criminal behavior can be compared and evaluated, how the theories evolved over time, and how they can be applied to criminal justice policy and practice
Theories of Criminal Behavior, CJC 201, TBA, cas, Criminal Justice, Donner, Summer Session A
CJC 390: Capstone Experience Internship Session: A, B Instructor: Vigil
The purpose of this course is to enhance the student's development and learning through observational and participatory experience in criminal justice agencies. Students will be able to contribute in a meaningful way to the operation of a specific criminal justice agency and be able to identify and describe the link between their field experience and prior courses.
Capstone Experience Internship, CJC 390, TBA, cas, Criminal Justice, Vigil, Summer Session A, B
CJC 396: Independent Study Session: C Instructor: Various
This course provides students with the opportunity to examine a specific topic in the field of criminal justice that is currently not offered or available. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of a specific criminal justice topic through directed readings and independent study.
Independent Study, CJC 396, TBA, cas, Criminal Justice, Various, Summer Session C
CLST 271: Classical Mythology Session: B Instructor: Livermore
This course focuses on Greek and Roman literature involving myth and how ancient and modern peoples use traditional narratives, characters, images and conceptions to explore, explain, and experiment with ideas about themselves and their surroundings in their historical, social, cultural and intellectual contexts. Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the fundamental myths of the ancient Greek and Roman world, their language and possible meanings, and how myth reflected important collective and individual concerns, values, beliefs, and practices then, even as modern myth does now.
Classical Mythology, CLST 271, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Classical Studies, Livermore, Summer Session B
CLST 272: Heroes & Classical Epics (WI) Session: B Instructor: Shellko
This course centers upon the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey and Vergil’s Aeneid and endeavors to place these epic poems into their historical, social, and cultural contexts. Students will learn the definition of epic as a literary genre and discover how this genre evolved to reflect audiences and times. You will learn the components of epic language, in particular, literary devices and structural features (e.g., formulas, nested stories, epic similes). Students will be able to describe the plots of the three epics and know the main- and mid-level human characters, gods, and goddesses. In addition, students will be able to define and better understand the meanings of “hero” and “heroism.” Learning how the epics are variously interpreted as well as basic methods of literary criticism (e.g., analysis of language, content, structure, etc.), students will employ these as ways to understand and interpret the poems.
Heroes & Classical Epics (WI), CLST 272, Mon, Wed, cas, Classical Studies, Shellko, Summer Session B
CLST 273 WI: Classical Tragedy - (WI) Session: A Instructor: Shellko
This course introduces students to extant Greek tragic drama, especially through the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of plot, characters and themes in Greek drama; understanding of the historical, social and cultural conditions implicated with each work; comprehension of concerns and values contained in them, such as justice, and how these are mirrored in modern literature and drama.
Classical Tragedy - (WI), CLST 273 WI, Tue, Thurs, cas, Classical Studies, Shellko, Summer Session A
CLST 276: World of Classical Rome Session: B Instructor: Albert Prieto JFRC
This course investigates the historical development of the Roman people through study of their history, politics, society and culture especially in the 1st centuries B.C.E. and C.E., the turning points of Republican and Imperial Rome. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge about the significant political, cultural and social accomplishments, events, institutions, trends, questions, and concerns, and the major figures of the age.
World of Classical Rome , CLST 276, TBA, Historical Knowledge , Albert Prieto , Summer Session B ,JFRC
COMM 101: Public Speaking / Critical-Thinking Session: A Instructor: Dominique Merritt
This introductory course is designed to supply students with the skills of public address, a fundamental understanding of critical thinking practices, foundational tenets of communication theory, a grasp of the relationship between context and communication, and a sense of the social responsibility that comes with the capacity for communication.
Public Speaking / Critical-Thinking, COMM 101, Mon, scps, Dominique Merritt, Summer Session A
COMM 101: Public Speaking and Critical Thinking Session: B Instructor: Romanelli
This introductory course is designed to supply students with the skills of public address, a fundamental understanding of critical thinking practices, foundational tenets of communication theory, a grasp of the relationship between context and communication, and a sense of the social responsibility that comes with the capacity for communication.
Public Speaking and Critical Thinking, COMM 101, Wed, communication, Communication, Romanelli, Summer Session B
COMM 103: Business & Professional Speaking Session: A Instructor: TBA
This course emphasizes communication in organizational settings, and examines the theory and practice of catering oral presentations for specific audiences.
Business & Professional Speaking, COMM 103, TBA, communication, Communication, TBA, Summer Session A
COMM 135: Introduction to Video Production Session: B Instructor: TBA
This course is a hands-on introduction to video field production. Students will explore how video and editing techniques create meaning in media by creating a number of short, creative video projects.
Introduction to Video Production, COMM 135, Tue, Thurs, communication, Communication, TBA, Summer Session B
COMM 175: Introduction to Communication Session: B Instructor: Maureen Keane
This course gives a general historical and theoretical overview of communication. By looking at communication through a critical, historical and theoretical lens, students will acquire an intellectual framework for further study and practice in communication.
Introduction to Communication, COMM 175, Mon, scps, Maureen Keane, Summer Session B
COMM 175: Introduction to Communication Session: A Instructor: DeCook
This course gives a general historical and theoretical overview of communication. By looking at communication through a critical, historical and theoretical lens, students will acquire an intellectual framework for further study and practice in communication.
Introduction to Communication , COMM 175, TBA, communication, Communication, DeCook, Summer Session A
COMM 200: Communication and New Media Session: A Instructor: Dougherty
This course explores the ways technology affects personal, cultural, and mass communication through examining the historical, societal, and ethical implications of newer and interactive forms of media. Students use audio, video, and digital tools to research and produce essays, projects, and presentations that analyze the impact of technology on communication.
Communication and New Media, COMM 200, TBA, communication, Communication, Dougherty, Summer Session A
COMM 205: Reporting Basics I Session: B Instructor: TBA
This course examines current issues in U.S. journalism with strong emphasis on developing skills in news reporting, interviewing, and writing. News Judgment; Writing Concisely and Clearly; Writing on Deadline; AP Style; Interviewing Techniques; Grammar, Spelling & Punctuation; Ethics & Legal Issues; Basic Research Methods.
Reporting Basics I, COMM 205, TBA, communication, Communication, TBA, Summer Session B
COMM 210: Principles of Public Relations Session: A Instructor: Kamerer
Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the roles and practices of the public relations professional, develop PR plans, and create a portfolio.
Principles of Public Relations, COMM 210, TBA, communication, Communication, Kamerer, Summer Session A
COMM 211: Principles of Advertising Session: A Instructor: Ritchell
This introduction to advertising provides an overview of the theory and hands-on practice of advertising including planning, strategy, creative development, and media planning. Elements of direct response, promotion, Internet, and public relations are also presented. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles of advertising and practice creative and decision-making skills in developing an advertising campaign.
Principles of Advertising, COMM 211, Tue, Wed, Thurs, communication, Communication, Ritchell, Summer Session A
COMM 215: Ethics and Communication Session: A Instructor: Brown
This course explores various approaches to ethical decision-making and applies that process to diverse aspects of every day, contemporary life. Students learn to discern a wide variety of ethical issues concerning communication behavior, apply systematic ethical analysis to various communication situations, and explain their analyses clearly.
Ethics and Communication, COMM 215, Tue, communication, Communication, Brown, Summer Session A
COMM 261: Social Media Session: A Instructor: David Kamerer
Starting from the foundation of traditional offline business and social communities and communication, this course will show how the real relationships of online business and social communities use content to build personal and business success at the speed and reach of the Internet. Outcomes: Articulate how the Internet and social media has changed the way we produce and consume content and how social media has affected the way we work, shop, and interact online and off.
Social Media, COMM 261, Mon, scps, David Kamerer, Summer Session A
COMM 274: Introduction to Cinema Session: B Instructor: TBA
This course is an introduction to the study of cinema as a complex medium of communication. Students will be provided with the basic terminology, observational skills, and theoretical background for the study of film aesthetics, language, cultural analysis, history, and the production of cinematic texts. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic approaches to film studies such as formal analysis, critical practices, and narrative studies.
Introduction to Cinema, COMM 274, Mon, Wed, communication, Communication, TBA, Summer Session B
COMM 370: Special Topics: Advertising/Public Relations Session: B Instructor: Morris
These are advanced courses in specialized AD/PR areas. Titles and content vary and prerequisites are established according to course content. May be repeated with different topics for a total of 9 credit hours, but only 6 may count toward the major. COMM 100 & (COMM 210 or 211); Graduate students majoring in Digital Media & Storytelling (DMST) and Global Strategic Communication (GSC) are also eligible to enroll
Special Topics: Advertising/Public Relations, COMM 370, TBA, communication, Communication, Morris, Summer Session B
COMM 378: AD/PR Practicum Session: A Instructor: John Slania
Students gain advanced practical experience in service experiential learning projects.
AD/PR Practicum, COMM 378, TBA, communication, Communication, John Slania, Summer Session A
COMM 381: Communication Practicum Session: C Instructor: Slania
Students gain advanced practical experience in service experiential learning projects.
Communication Practicum, COMM 381, TBA, communication, Communication, Slania, Summer Session C
COMM 382: Journalism Practicum Session: C Instructor: Slania
Students gain hands-on practical experience in developing Journalism projects.
Journalism Practicum, COMM 382, TBA, communication, Communication, Slania, Summer Session C
COMM 384: Digital Cinema Practicum Session: C Instructor: Slania
Students will gain advanced practical experience creating digital cinema projects.
Digital Cinema Practicum, COMM 384, TBA, communication, Communication, Slania, Summer Session C
COMM 391: Internship - Advertising and Public Relations Session: C Instructor: Ritchell
This supervised field experience enables students to have hands-on professional learning at a wide range of agency, corporate, and non-profit organizations as the basis for learning and refining professional communication skills.
Internship - Advertising and Public Relations, COMM 391, Mon, Wed, communication, Communication, Ritchell, Summer Session C
COMM 392: Internship - Journalism Session: C Instructor: Lamberti
This supervised field experience enables students to have hands-on professional learning at a wide range of agency, corporate, and non-profit organizations as the basis for learning and refining professional communication skills. Students gain proficiency in professional conduct and industry skills while systematically reflecting on their experiences.
Internship - Journalism, COMM 392, Mon, Wed, communication, Communication, Lamberti, Summer Session C
COMM 393: Internship - Communication Studies Session: C Instructor: Lamberti
This supervised field experience uses experiential learning at a wide variety of corporate, professional, and non-profit organizations as the basis for learning and refining communication skills. Students will be able to demonstrate skill proficiency as required at their sites, professional conduct, and systematic reflection on their experiences.
Internship - Communication Studies, COMM 393, Mon, Wed, communication, Communication, Lamberti, Summer Session C
COMM 394: Internship - Film and Digital Media Session: C Instructor: Lamberti
This supervised field experience enables students to have hands-on professional learning at a wide range of agency, corporate, and non-profit organizations as the basis for learning and refining professional communication skills.
Internship - Film and Digital Media, COMM 394, Mon, Wed, communication, Communications, Lamberti, Summer Session C
COMP 125: Visual Information Processing Session: B Instructor: Wetzel
This course, intended primarily for non-majors, provides an introduction to computer programming using a language well-suited to beginning programmers and practical applications, e.g., Visual Basic.Net. Outcome: Understanding of computer mechanisms for representing and analyzing numerical and logical information and the power of programmability; practical ability to implement useful computing tools.
Visual Information Processing, COMP 125, TBA, cas, Computer Science, Wetzel, Summer Session B
COMP 150: Introduction to Computing Session: A Instructor: Harrington
The world overflows with electronic data. This course introduces programming in a simple, powerful language like Python, with selection, repetition, functions, graphical effects, and dynamic interaction with the Internet, plus connections to lower level computer organization and computer implications in the wider world. At the end of the course, students will be empowered to manage and transform masses of data; understanding of technical, societal, and ethical issues involved. For additional course information, please visit: http://anh.cs.luc.edu/150/summerintro.html .
Introduction to Computing, COMP 150, Mon, Tue, Thurs, cas, Computer Science, Harrington, Summer Session A
COMP 170: Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming Session: C Instructor: TBA
This introductory course to the computer science major covers basic concepts of object-oriented (OO) programming languages. It will address the following questions: What is an algorithm? How does one write, debug, run (execute), and test an effective computer program? How does one convert an algorithm into a computer program? How does one judge a program? What does "object-oriented" mean? Topics include: variables, data types, input/output, loops and repetition, Boolean expressions and logic, arrays, subprograms, classes/objects, OO principles. This course is programming intensive. Lab sessions and assigned work will be take place both during synchronous online class periods and on your own time. For more information see: http://people.cs.luc.edu/whonig/Comp170 .
Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming, COMP 170, Wed, Sat, cas, Computer Science, TBA, Summer Session C
COMP 271: Data Structures and Applications Session: Full Instructor: Irakliotis
This course introduces key data structures such as lists, sets, and maps, as well as their implementations. Performance and analysis of algorithms are covered along with applications in sorting and searching. Outcome: Students will learn to design new data structures as well as learn to use existing data structures in applications.
Data Structures and Applications, COMP 271, Tue, Thurs, cas, Computer Science, Irakliotis, Summer Session Full
COMP 313/413: Intermediate Object-Oriented Development Session: A, B Instructor: Yacobellis
Object-orientation continues to be a dominant approach to software development. This intermediate programming-intensive course studies the use of classes and objects with an emphasis on collaboration among objects. At the end of the course, students will have a thorough understanding of the principles of object-orientation: abstraction, delegation, inheritance, and polymorphism; exposure to basic design patterns; programming experience in mainstream object-oriented languages such as C++ and Java.
Intermediate Object-Oriented Development, COMP 313/413, Mon, Tue, Thurs, cas, Computer Science, Yacobellis, Summer Session A, B
COMP 317/417: Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Computing Session: A Instructor: Dordal
This course covers social, legal, and ethical issues commonly arising in key areas related to computing technologies. Students will be able to understand the laws and issues in areas such as privacy, encryption, freedom of speech, copyrights and patents, computer crime, and computer/software reliability and safety; understanding of philosophical perspectives such as utilitarianism versus deontological ethics and basics of the U.S. legal system.
Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Computing, COMP 317/417, Tue, Thurs, cas, Computer Science, Dordal, Summer Session A
COMP 349/449: Wireless Networking and Security Session: B Instructor: Schmitz
In a mobile world, the ability to gain network access in a convenient manner, but yet securely, is becoming more and more of a requirement. This course will explore the wireless standards, authentication issues, common configuration models for commercial versus institution installs and analyze the security concerns associated with ad-hoc and standards-based methods of networking.
Wireless Networking and Security, COMP 349/449, Mon, Wed, cas, Computer Science, Schmitz, Summer Session B
COMP 391: Internship in Computer Science Session: A, B, C Instructor: Various
Students work outside the classroom applying and extending their computer science skills, typically for at least 150 hours for 3 credits. A memorandum of understanding is required between a student, his or her employer, and the Undergraduate Program Director, followed by final reports from the student and the employer.
Internship in Computer Science, COMP 391, TBA, cas, Computer Science, Various, Summer Session A, B, C
COMP 398: Independent Study Session: A, B Instructor: Various
The student and a sponsoring faculty member will determine an advanced topic for the student to work on. Outcome: Knowledge of an advanced topic.
Independent Study, COMP 398, TBA, cas, Computer Science, Various, Summer Session A, B
CPST 200: Introduction to Degree Completion Session: C Instructor: Natasha Teetsov
CPST 200 exists to give newly admitted adult students a chance to ease themselves back into the academic environment while highlighting all of the tools and services available through the university. Outcomes: Exposure to/familiarity with LUC resources. Improved academic writing through use of multiple drafts.
Introduction to Degree Completion, CPST 200, Wed, scps, Natasha Teetsov, Summer Session C
CPST 201: Professional Identity and Development Session: C Instructor: Jan Shurtz
Enrollment is restricted to students in the School of Continuing and Professional Studies. This course engages students in exploration of their self-perception and the ways in which they are perceived by others, especially the workplace. The course continues to consider both the development of personal goals and consistent feedback for positive change. Students will develop the themes of leadership and management in the context of the "five hungers" of Loyola's document of Transformative Education. Outcome: Students will develop a professional identity profile and define a personal set of goals by managing an online profile of accomplishments and develop a written strategy to support personal goals with measures of progress.
Professional Identity and Development, CPST 201, scps, Jan Shurtz, Summer Session C
CPST 245: Macroeconomics Session: C Instructor: Jacqueline Ward
Introduces economic analysis that studies system wide phenomena including inflation, economic growth and development and unemployment. Includes a focus on behavioral economics, and provides students with an opportunity to analyze real world economic and public policy decisions that have been influenced by non-economic factors included within its field. Outcomes: 1. Explain the law of supply and demand 2. Describe the nature of macroeconomic issues and problems 3. Articulate the objectives of monetary and fiscal policies and the function of the two principal policy makers 4. Analyze historical macroeconomic crises 5. Discuss basic macroeconomic goals such as GDP, CPI and unemployment 6. Assess public policy decisions from a behavioral economic perspective
Macroeconomics, CPST 245, scps, Jacqueline Ward, Summer Session C
CPST 250: Foundations of Organizations Session: C Instructor: Marilyn Stocker
An introduction to contemporary management with emphasis on organizational culture, decision making, organizational structure and design, planning, communication and information technology. Outcome: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the managerial roles in organizations, the four levels at which behavior is examined in organizations and will develop a framework for basic business operations.
Foundations of Organizations, CPST 250, scps, Marilyn Stocker, Summer Session C
CPST 265: Special Topics Art History: Renaissance-Modern Session: A Instructor: William McGuire
Course titles and content will vary from term to term. Permission is required to enroll.
Special Topics Art History: Renaissance-Modern, CPST 265, Sat, scps, William McGuire, Summer Session A
CPST 310: Acct Principles & Applications Session: C Instructor: Ramiza Vulic
This course introduces major concepts in the areas of financial and managerial accounting and develops understanding of accounting process and principles. Students will gain a deeper understanding of financial statements, accounting mechanics, accrual accounting, financial planning, variance analysis, internal controls and financial and financial analysis. Outcomes: Students will gain a deeper understanding of financial statements, accounting mechanics, accrual accounting, financial planning, variance analysis, internal controls and financial and financial analysis. The students will complete a final course project that demonstrates their ability to manage the financial data of a fictional organization.
Acct Principles & Applications, CPST 310, scps, Ramiza Vulic, Summer Session C
CPST 335: Law and Regulations for Organizational Leaders Session: C Instructor: Jessica Depinto
The role of the organization (for profit, non-profit and governmental) from the dual perspective of private and public law. Includes foundations of law and judicial process; contracts, torts, and property law; intellectual property rights; legal, securities and employment regulations; ethical considerations and policy issues. Outcomes: -Differentiate ethics and law/private and public law -Discuss Constitutional Law and government¿s role to regulate business -Apply basic legal principles to the private market -Explain legal principles of contracts
Law and Regulations for Organizational Leaders, CPST 335, Tue, scps, Jessica Depinto, Summer Session C
CPST 349: Project Management Session: C Instructor: Daniel Vonder Heide
The art and science of project management as applied to a variety of business, commercial, and public management situations. Covers all phases of the project life-cycle; techniques for planning, scheduling and control of projects; project organizations; and techniques for building effective project teams. Student will gain a working knowledge of the fundamental principles and techniques of effective project management, and how to apply these principles and techniques in the business environment.
Project Management, CPST 349, Wed, scps, Daniel Vonder Heide, Summer Session C
CPST 360: Development and Change in Organizations Session: A Instructor: Amy Jordan
Students will investigate the theory and practice of organizational development, examine assumptions, strategies, models, intervention techniques for organizational development and change processes. Students will also study the formation of collaborative relationships, overcoming resistance, gaining commitment and realigning culture. Outcome: Students will provide case studies that integrate data; design interventions, change strategies and an evaluation for diagnosing organizations, groups and jobs.
Development and Change in Organizations, CPST 360, scps, Amy Jordan, Summer Session A
CPST 370: Leadership Theory & Application Session: A Instructor: Amy Jordan
Students will study leadership theory, concepts and the practical application of leadership at all levels. Students will analyze historical approaches to leadership and focus on influential contemporary leadership perspectives such as servant leadership, situational leadership, transformational leadership, and principle-centered leadership. Outcome: Students will complete a leadership development plan and apply leadership theories to workplace situations through reflection, real-life examples, and case studies.
Leadership Theory & Application, CPST 370, scps, Amy Jordan, Summer Session A
CPSY 424: Career Development & Counseling Session: A
This course examines research and theories on career development and counseling and their applications to assessing, treating, and preventing career-related problems across the life-cycle. Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of five major theories of career development; the structure of vocational interests, needs, and abilities and how each can be assessed, major sources of occupational information; how to apply theory and research to problems of career choice-making, job finding, and work adjustment.
Career Development & Counseling, CPSY 424, Tue, Thurs, education, Counseling Psychology, Summer Session A
CPSY 273: Developmental Psychology Session: A
Developmental Psychology, CPSY 273, education, Counseling Psychology, Summer Session A
CPSY 333: Abnormal Psychology Session: A
Abnormal Psychology, CPSY 333, TBA, education, Counseling Psychology, Summer Session A
CPSY 424: Career Development & Counseling Session: B
This course examines research and theories on career development and counseling and their applications to assessing, treating, and preventing career-related problems across the life-cycle. Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of five major theories of career development; the structure of vocational interests, needs, and abilities and how each can be assessed, major sources of occupational information; how to apply theory and research to problems of career choice-making, job finding, and work adjustment.
Career Development & Counseling, CPSY 424, education, Counseling Psychology, Summer Session B
CPSY 425: Assessment in Counseling Instructor: TBA
This is an introductory, graduate-level course on testing and assessment in counseling. As such, it will provide an introduction to the conceptual and quantitative foundations of psychological measurement, a survey of approaches for the assessment of personality and cognitive abilities, and a discussion of how to use assessment results in counseling. This course is not intended to provide in-depth coverage of single approaches to assessment (e.g., projective) or single areas of assessment (e.g., normal personality).
Assessment in Counseling , CPSY 425, TBA, education, TBA,
CPSY 426: Group Counseling Session: B Instructor: Staff
Outcome: Students will be able to understand and integrate various properties of groups into a meaningful theoretical framework, and develop and demonstrate an understanding of group process through participation in a group experience.
Group Counseling , CPSY 426, TBA, tgs, Staff, Summer Session B
CPSY 426: Group Counseling Session: B Instructor: Staff
Outcome: Students will be able to understand and integrate various properties of groups into a meaningful theoretical framework, and develop and demonstrate an understanding of group process through participation in a group experience.
Group Counseling , CPSY 426, Mon, Wed, tgs, Staff, Summer Session B
CPSY 435: Selected Topics in Counseling Session: A Instructor: Matt Miller
This is an advanced seminar on selected topics in counseling. Topics vary but typically have included the following: school counseling, community counseling, the psychology of oppression, prevention and outreach, and supervision. Outcome: Outcomes vary with the topic.
Selected Topics in Counseling , CPSY 435, TBA, tgs, Matt Miller, Summer Session A
CPSY 437: Addiction Counseling Session: B Instructor: Kathleen Emery
This course is designed to provide an introduction to the fundamentals of addiction counseling. This course will supply students with the requisite knowledge relevant to this area. Outcome: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the etiology and diagnosis of substance abuse problems and their treatment from major theoretical perspectives.
Addiction Counseling , CPSY 437, TBA, Kathleen Emery, Summer Session B
CPSY 437: Addiction Counseling Session: B Instructor: Kathleen Emery
This course is designed to provide an introduction to the fundamentals of addiction counseling. This course will supply students with the requisite knowledge relevant to this area. Outcome: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the etiology and diagnosis of substance abuse problems and their treatment from major theoretical perspectives.
Addiction Counseling , CPSY 437, TBA, Kathleen Emery , Summer Session B
CPSY 441: Internship Session: A Instructor: Laura Riggs
This course is a supervised experience in counseling taken in a two-semester sequence with CPSY 440 by students in the community and school counseling programs. Field placement is required. Outcome: Students will demonstrate case conceptualization, treatment planning, and counseling skills with diverse clients in individual and group contexts, and understand the APA code of ethics.
Internship, CPSY 441, Mon, Laura Riggs, Summer Session A
CPSY 443: Clerkship Session: A Instructor: Rufus Gonzales
This is an elective supervised clinical experience in assessment or psychotherapy for doctoral students in counseling psychology. Field placement is required and all supervision is provided on-site by a qualified supervisor employed by the agency in which the fieldwork is taking place. Outcome: Varies with goals of student and agreement with field site.
Clerkship , CPSY 443, TBA, Rufus Gonzales, Summer Session A
CPSY 443: Clerkship Session: B Instructor: Rufus Gonzales
This is an elective supervised clinical experience in assessment or psychotherapy for doctoral students in counseling psychology. Field placement is required and all supervision is provided on-site by a qualified supervisor employed by the agency in which the fieldwork is taking place. Outcome: Varies with goals of student and agreement with field site.
Clerkship, CPSY 443, TBA, Rufus Gonzales, Summer Session B
CPSY 443: Clerkship Instructor: Rufus Gonzales
This is an elective supervised clinical experience in assessment or psychotherapy for doctoral students in counseling psychology. Field placement is required and all supervision is provided on-site by a qualified supervisor employed by the agency in which the fieldwork is taking place. Outcome: Varies with goals of student and agreement with field site.
Clerkship, CPSY 443, TBA, Rufus Gonzales,
CPSY 443: Clerkship Session: A Instructor: Rufus Gonzales
This is an elective supervised clinical experience in assessment or psychotherapy for doctoral students in counseling psychology. Field placement is required and all supervision is provided on-site by a qualified supervisor employed by the agency in which the fieldwork is taking place. Outcome: Varies with goals of student and agreement with field site.
Clerkship, CPSY 443, TBA, Rufus Gonzales, Summer Session A
CPSY 444: Family Therapy I Session: B Instructor: Eunju Yoon
This course is designed to introduce students to foundational approaches and theories of family therapy. Outcome: Students will be able to apply foundational theories and their corresponding interventions to clinical problems in a family context.
Family Therapy I, CPSY 444, Mon, Wed, tgs, Eunju Yoon, Summer Session B
CPSY 444: Family Therapy I Instructor: TBA
This course is designed to introduce students to foundational approaches and theories of family therapy. Outcome: Students will be able to apply foundational theories and their corresponding interventions to clinical problems in a family context
Family Therapy I, CPSY 444, TBA, tgs, TBA,
CPSY 454: Hum Dev: Cog, Aff & Phys Bas Session: A Instructor: TBA
Restricted to Graduate Students. This course is a graduate-level survey of human development across the lifespan. Outcome: To build the students¿ foundational knowledge of lifespan developmental theories and research and to critically examine the extent to which cultural variation is included and/or excluded from developmental theories.
Hum Dev: Cog, Aff & Phys Bas, CPSY 454, TBA, tgs, TBA, Summer Session A
CPSY 454: Hum Dev: Cog, Aff & Phys Bas Session: A Instructor: TBA
Restricted to Graduate Students. This course is a graduate-level survey of human development across the lifespan. Outcome: To build the students¿ foundational knowledge of lifespan developmental theories and research and to critically examine the extent to which cultural variation is included and/or excluded from developmental theories.
Hum Dev: Cog, Aff & Phys Bas, CPSY 454, TBA, tgs, TBA, Summer Session A
CPSY 498: Independent Study Session: A Instructor: Matt Miller
Topics are chosen for individual study. Must be approved by an instructor and department chairperson.
Independent Study , CPSY 498, TBA, tgs, Matt Miller, Summer Session A
CPSY 498: Independent Study Session: B Instructor: Matt Miller
Topics are chosen for individual study. Must be approved by an instructor and department chairperson.
Independent Study , CPSY 498, TBA, tgs, Matt Miller, Summer Session B
CPSY 499: Independent Research Session: B Instructor: Matt Miller
Research projects selected by the individual student, with the approval of the research supervisor and the department chairperson.
Independent Research, CPSY 499, TBA, tgs, Matt Miller, Summer Session B
ECON 201: Principles of Microeconomics Session: A Instructor: Barnes
Requirement: ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of Anthropology, Department of Criminal Justice, Department of Economics, Department of Psychology, Department of Political Science, the Department of Sociology, Human Services or the School of Nursing. This course is an introduction to demand and supply, consumer choice, price analysis in alternative industrial organizations, and the distribution of income. Students will be able to think critically about price formation in different market structures, and how prices, household incomes and income distribution in a diverse society are determined with interpretations based on the concepts of opportunity costs and decision making under uncertainty.
Principles of Microeconomics, ECON 201, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Economics, Barnes, Summer Session A
ECON 202: Principles of Macroeconomics Session: B Instructor: Barnes
Requirement: ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of Anthropology, Department of Criminal Justice, Department of Economics, Department of Psychology, Department of Political Science, the Department of Sociology, Human Services or the School of Nursing. This course is an introduction to national product, its components, money and the real sectors and business fluctuations. Students will be able to think critically about the economic environment of the nation and to measure growth, unemployment, inflation, fiscal and monetary policies of the government, to ultimately understand economic stability and the welfare of the individual citizen.
Principles of Macroeconomics, ECON 202, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Economics, Barnes, Summer Session B
ECON 303: Intermediate Microeconomics Session: C Instructor: Trevino
This course is a detailed study of consumer and firm behavior, market structures, and the elementary propositions concerning welfare economics. Students will develop analytical skills to understand and predict consumer and firm behavior, understand the underlying pinning of antitrust legislation and dynamic market strategies.
Intermediate Microeconomics, ECON 303, TBA, quinlan, Economics, Trevino, Summer Session C
ELPS 595: Thesis Supervision Session: A
Thesis Supervision, ELPS 595, TBA, education, Education Leadership & Policy, Summer Session A
ELPS 265: Cultural and Educational Policy Studies Internship Session: A Instructor: Julia Allison
The Internship in Cultural and Educational Policy Studies course is intended to help students integrate theoretically and research coursework with practical field-based experience to reflect on their own development as professionals working in the field of education. Class Attributes: Engaged Learning Outcomes: Students develop and refine their professional skills and competencies. Students will be able to identify key education issues domestically and/or internationally and critically analyze them in terms of the relationship(s) between policy and practice.
Cultural and Educational Policy Studies Internship, ELPS 265, TBA, education, Julia Allison, Summer Session A
ELPS 302: Philosophy of Education Session: A Instructor: Samantha Deane
Study of major philosophical theories about educational practice, especially as these relate to pedagogical practice, curriculum development, and the response of schools to a particular individual, community, and societal interests. Outcomes: The student will become adept at identifying philosophical issues embedded in current educational practice and controversies, especially as these relate to promoting the values of a democratic society, accommodating the interests of the society and particular groups within it, and the realization of social justice. Class Notes: Synchronous sessions will take place May 18 - May 29th, 9 -11 AM, and then possible asynchronous lessons and FINAL projects will be finished and due by the end of the session on June 12th. Monday, May 25th: No Classes per Memorial Day.
Philosophy of Education, ELPS 302, TBA, education, School of Education, Samantha Deane, Summer Session A
ELPS 402: Mission and Catholic School Leadership Session: A Instructor: Debra Sullivan, Michael Boyle
This course explores how mission must be central to leadership and how all activities must align with that mission. Students will explore inputs, transformation processes, and outputs as they relate to Catholic Ed leadership and school improvement. Students will explore inputs, transformation processes, and outputs as they relate to.
Mission and Catholic School Leadership, ELPS 402, TBA, tgs, Debra Sullivan, Michael Boyle, Summer Session A
ELPS 406: Foundations Using Data for Continuous Improvement Session: B Instructor: Staff
This is the foundation course for data-based decision making within the principal preparation series. This graduate course provides skillsets to help future school leaders and administrators to access, interpret, and encourage the use of data to improve student educational outcomes. Restricted to graduate students in the School of Education. Students will learn how to organize, analyze, and synthesize data in order to interpret student and teacher assessment results.
Foundations Using Data for Continuous Improvement, ELPS 406, TBA, tgs, Staff, Summer Session B
ELPS 408: Leading For Diversity Session: B Instructor: Tatiana Meira Bonuma Dos Santos
This course focuses on meeting the needs of children from diverse linguistic, cultural, and racial backgrounds within the context of a society faced with issues of poverty, discrimination, racism, and sexism. This course explores issues of the second language and second culture acquisition and considers the relationship between identity construction and school success.
Leading For Diversity , ELPS 408, TBA, tgs, Tatiana Meira Bonuma Dos Santos , Summer Session B
ELPS 429: Selected Topics in Higher Education Session: A Instructor: Darren Pierre
This course will discuss special topics in higher education policy and practice. Outcomes: Students will be able to identify, review, and critically analyze significant higher education policy and practice issues.
Selected Topics in Higher Education , ELPS 429, TBA, tgs, Darren Pierre, Summer Session A
ELPS 458: International Education Session: A Instructor: Tavis Jules
International Education, ELPS 458, Mon, Wed, tgs, Tavis Jules, Summer Session A
ELPS 465: Workshops Session: B Instructor: Kaine Osburn
These workshops focus on specific areas of educational leadership such as Instructional Leadership, Equity, and Justice; Collective Bargaining; Research in Educational Leadership; Instructional Leadership, Cultural Context for Informed Decision Making; The Superintendency. Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of and leadership competencies in the relevant workshop area. Class Topic: The Superintendency
Workshops, ELPS 465, Mon, Wed, tgs, Kaine Osburn, Summer Session B
ELPS 465: Workshops Session: B Instructor: Staff JFRC
These workshops focus on specific areas of educational leadership such as Instructional Leadership, Equity, and Justice; Collective Bargaining; Research in Educational Leadership; Instructional Leadership, Cultural Context for Informed Decision Making; The Superintendency. Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of and leadership competencies in the relevant workshop area. Class Notes - Rome: Catholic Cohort CEM 7
Workshops, ELPS 465, TBA, Staff, Summer Session B ,JFRC
ELPS 468: Problems in Finance and Business Management Instructor: TBA
Examination of the social justice issues inherent in developing and evaluating state and local school finance policy, including equity, adequacy, the social and ethical issues associated with allocating resources and relating school costs to achievement. Selected problems of school district financial management are studied, including central office organization, financial management and control, securing and accounting for grant funds, debt financing, insurance and support services management. This course covers topics especially pertinent to district administrators and superintendents. Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of and competencies relevant to district level leadership in financial management, control, and allocation through the lens of social justice issues.
Problems in Finance and Business Management, ELPS 468, Wed, tgs, TBA,
ELPS 484: School Law, Policy Formation, and Community Involvement Session: A Instructor: Staff
This course covers school law and policy formation designed for candidates seeking to become building leaders in schools. Outcomes: Candidates will acquire the knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary to understand school law and ethical decision making with particular attention given to building safety, current legal "hot topics," understanding the governance of the local school board, and working with the various communities associated with a school.
School Law, Policy Formation, and Community Involvement, ELPS 484, Mon, Wed, tgs, Staff, Summer Session A
ELPS 484: School Law, Policy Formation, and Community Involvement Session: A Instructor: TBA
This course covers school law and policy formation designed for candidates seeking to become building leaders in schools. Outcomes: Candidates will acquire the knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary to understand school law and ethical decision making with particular attention given to building safety, current legal "hot topics," understanding the governance of the local school board and working with the various communities associated with a school.
School Law, Policy Formation, and Community Involvement, ELPS 484, TBA, tgs, TBA, Summer Session A
ELPS 498: Independent Study Session: A Instructor: Darren Pierre
Course content arranged with the professor.
Independent Study , ELPS 498, TBA, tgs, Darren Pierre, Summer Session A
ELPS 498: Independent Study Session: B Instructor: Staff
Course content arranged with Professor.
Independent Study , ELPS 498, TBA, tgs, Staff, Summer Session B
ELPS 498: Independent Study Session: A Instructor: Staff
Class content arranged with Professor.
Independent Study , ELPS 498, TBA, tgs, Staff, Summer Session A
ELPS 498: Independent Study Session: B Instructor: Staff
Class content arranged with Professor.
Independent Study, ELPS 498, TBA, tgs, Staff, Summer Session B
ELPS 498: Independent Study Session: A Instructor: Staff
Class content arranged with Professor.
Independent Study , ELPS 498, TBA, tgs, Staff, Summer Session A
ELPS 498: Independent Study Session: A Instructor: Aurora Chang
Class content arranged with Professor.
Independent Study, ELPS 498, TBA, tgs, Aurora Chang, Summer Session A
ELPS 529: Seminar in Higher Education Session: B Instructor: Aurora Chang
Outcome: Students will demonstrate a deepened understanding of one or more topics or issues and the ability to critically analyze these topics/issues using research and theory.
Seminar in Higher Education, ELPS 529, TBA, tgs, Aurora Chang, Summer Session B
ELPS 550: Globalization and Education Instructor: Noah Sobe
This advanced comparative education seminar examines globalization (economic, social, and cultural) both as something that has a profound impact on schooling and as something that education produces. The course will focus on how globalization can be productively theorized and studied by social scientists. Outcome: Students in the course will understand and be able to critically evaluate the diverse range of approaches used by comparative and international education scholars to study education and globalization.
Globalization and Education , ELPS 550, TBA, tgs, Noah Sobe,
ELPS 564: Education Policy Internship Session: A Instructor: Yver Melchor
This course provides Cultural & Educational Policy Studies graduate students with an engaged learning opportunity that integrates coursework with professional practice in the context of education policy information, analysis, implementation and/or evaluation and research. Students develop and refine professional skills as well as identify and reinforce connections between graduate coursework and professional experiences.
Education Policy Internship , ELPS 564, TBA, education, tgs, Yver Melchor, Summer Session A
ELPS 564: Education Policy Internship Session: B Instructor: Yver Melchor
This course provides Cultural & Educational Policy Studies graduate students with an engaged learning opportunity that integrates coursework with professional practice in the context of education policy information, analysis, implementation and/or evaluation and research.
Education Policy Internship, ELPS 564, TBA, education, tgs, Education Leadership & Policy, Yver Melchor, Summer Session B
ENGL 100: Developmental Writing Session: C Instructor: Christopher Dickman
English 100 is a basic writing course that provides instruction in fundamental composition skills to prepare the student for UCWR 110. The course emphasizes mastery of grammar, usage, and punctuation. Placement required. Outcome: Students will develop skill in: writing with a clear audience and purpose in mind; developing a clearly stated thesis which acts as the governing idea of an essay; writing coherent paragraphs and well-organized longer essays using various invention strategies; using transitions to link ideas; exhibiting a working knowledge of basic grammar, usage, and punctuation conventions.
Developmental Writing, ENGL 100, scps, Christopher Dickman, Summer Session C
ENGL 210 (WI): Business Writing Session: A Instructor: Meinhardt
Business Writing is a seminar designed to build and improve effective communication practices for use in the business community. The ideas of personal professionalism and priority of purposes guide an exploration of business writing genres ranging from correspondence to memos, and from employment documents to executive summaries. Collaboration, peer interaction, and individual economy direct the creation of a series of writing projects that use revision and research as a necessary step in the writing process. ENGL 210-20W is a writing intensive class.
Business Writing, ENGL 210 (WI), Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, English, Meinhardt, Summer Session A
ENGL 271 (WI): Exploring Poetry Session: A Instructor: Meinhardt
This synchronous online seminar establishes a foundation from which to ground, understand, situate, analyze, and even create contemporary poetry in a vigorous and rewarding way. We will use asynchronous contact for some activities as well, but the synchronous participation is mandatory. We are here to explore principles of poetry structure and writing through a combination of lectures, craft analyses, writing exercises, assigned reading, in-class reading, discussion, and assigned writing projects; but this is a writing course, designed to develop analytical and aesthetic skills, most notably through student critical awareness of the places a writer may inhabit in the greater genre of poetry and how and why this may have value to the student as a student, scholar, writer and world citizen. The course establishes a poetic historical/ontological framework in order to recognize the general arc of the art-form. We will then explore a general critical sensibility of poetry structure, writing, technique, and purpose using established writers’ poems and perspectives on craft. We will examine genre, structure and style as an avenue of interpretation, classification and creation. The final stage of the course focuses on analysis of value assessment for poetry in a contemporary setting, particularly within a contemporary capitalist framework. The course is designed to cultivate an authentic and lifelong appreciation of the myriad ways that poetry shapes contemporary life and/or could with more and better awareness and exposure; and the course will satisfy a Writing-Intensive requirement.
Exploring Poetry, ENGL 271 (WI), Tue, Thurs, cas, English, Meinhardt, Summer Session A
ENGL 272 (WI): Exploring Drama Session: B Instructor: Kessel
In this course we will explore the components of drama by examining the adaptation of several plays into the medium of film. We will read, discuss, and write about plays from different time periods and in different genres, including drama, comedy, and musical. All of these plays represent the relationships and complex emotions of human beings as individuals, as family members, and as members of society. We will begin by reading and discussing each of the original stage plays and then viewing the film into which it was adapted. When possible, we will view video clips of the plays performed on stage. Applying theory of adaptation, we will think about how transference from the stage to the screen changes the dramatization. How do the director, adaptor, screen actors, and the medium of film itself alter the vision of the original work? Students will be asked to write three short papers and a take-home final.
Exploring Drama, ENGL 272 (WI), Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, English, Kessel, Summer Session B
ENGL 273 (WI): Exploring Fiction Session: A Instructor: Jack Kerkering
This course focuses on the understanding, appreciation, and criticism of prose fiction. Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of fiction as a means of exploring human experience and understanding the creative process, and be able to use the technical vocabulary necessary for understanding fiction.
Exploring Fiction, ENGL 273 (WI), Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, English, Jack Kerkering, Summer Session A
ENGL 283 (WI): Women in Literature Session: A Instructor: Bradshaw
This section of ENGL 283: Women in Literature focuses on divas and diva culture. Revered and reviled, imitated and appropriated, divas are the most visible women in our culture. They are also the most misunderstood. On the one hand, the diva represents empowerment—she is loud, courageous, and often outrageous. But her power comes at a great cost: when she is consumed and absorbed into fans’ lives, she risks becoming the object of obsession. She also risks losing her identity, even as she serves as a vehicle for shaping others’. This class uses fiction, drama, biography, autobiography, film, and performance theory to explore the paradoxes and problems of the “woman with a voice” and her place in contemporary conceptions of femininity.
Women in Literature , ENGL 283 (WI), Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, English, Bradshaw, Summer Session A
ENGL 283 (WI): Women in Literature Session: B Instructor: Kenney Johnston
This section of ENGL 283: Women in Literature focuses on divas and diva culture. Revered and reviled, imitated and appropriated, divas are the most visible women in our culture. They are also the most misunderstood. On the one hand, the diva represents empowerment—she is loud, courageous, and often outrageous. But her power comes at a great cost: when she is consumed and absorbed into fans’ lives, she risks becoming the object of obsession. She also risks losing her identity, even as she serves as a vehicle for shaping others’. This class uses fiction, drama, biography, autobiography, film, and performance theory to explore the paradoxes and problems of the “woman with a voice” and her place in contemporary conceptions of femininity.
Women in Literature, ENGL 283 (WI), TBA, cas, English, Kenney Johnston, Summer Session B
ENGL 288 (WI): Nature in Literature Session: A Instructor: Bayley
This course focuses on the relationship of human beings and the environment in which they function, as represented in a variety of literary works. Outcome: students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the representations of "nature" in various periods of literary history and diverse cultural contexts.
Nature in Literature, ENGL 288 (WI), Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, English, Bayley, Summer Session A
ENGL 290: Human Values in Literature Session: B Instructor: Harveen Mann
This variable topics course focuses on a perennial psychological or philosophical problem facing the individual as exemplified in literary works, e.g., the passage from innocence to experience, the problem of death, and the idea of liberty. Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the ability of literature to express the deepest and most abiding concerns of human beings, and how literary works come to be.
Human Values in Literature, ENGL 290, TBA, cas, English, Harveen Mann, Summer Session B
ENGL 317 : The Writing of Poetry Session: B Instructor: Michael Rydel
This course provides extensive practice in both the reading and the writing of poetry. Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the critical skills necessary for discussing, analyzing and formulating arguments about poetry, and will produce a portfolio of original poems.
The Writing of Poetry , ENGL 317 , scps, Michael Rydel, Summer Session B
ENGL 318R: Writing Fiction: Writing Rome (WI) Session: B Instructor: Nefeli Misuraca JFRC
By exploring the city of Rome through reading, writing, and on-site classes, students will be provided with an interdisciplinary approach to the generation of written work. This course will discuss the techniques of fiction writing, drawing inspiration from the city of Rome as a backdrop. On-site classes will enrich the fiction writing process, while in-class workshops will offer guidance in writing works of short original fiction.
Writing Fiction: Writing Rome (WI), ENGL 318R, TBA, Writing , Nefeli Misuraca , Summer Session B ,JFRC
ENGL 319: Creative Writing Nonfiction Session: Full Instructor: Kenney Johnston
Creative nonfiction is today's most popular genre. In this class, students will study and write creative nonfiction of different forms (e.g., memoir, travel writing, personal essay, literary journalism, the lyric essay). By reading and analyzing published models, students will deepen their learning of traditional and innovative creative nonfiction methods. Students will then write creative nonfiction pieces and participate in workshops of their classmates' writing.​
Creative Writing Nonfiction, ENGL 319, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, English, Kenney Johnston, Summer Session Full
ENGL 394: Internship Session: A, B Instructor: Cragwall
English 394 provides practical, on-the-job experience for English majors in adapting their writing and analytical skills to the needs of such fields as publishing, editing, and public relations. Students must have completed six courses in English and must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher before applying for an internship. Qualified second semester juniors and seniors may apply to the program. Interested students must arrange to meet with the Internship Director during the pre-registration period and must bring with them a copy of their Loyola transcripts, a detailed resume (which includes the names and phone numbers of at least two references), and at least three writing samples. Students may be required to conduct part of their job search on-line and to go out on job interviews before the semester begins. Course requirements include: completion of a minimum of 120 hours of work; periodic meetings with the Internship Director; a written evaluation of job performance by the site supervisor; a term paper, including samples of writing produced on the job.
Internship, ENGL 394, TBA, cas, English, Cragwall, Summer Session A, B
ENGL 399: Special Studies in Literature Session: A, B Instructor: Cragwall
Students arrange for this course on an individual basis by consulting a faculty member who agrees to supervise the independent study. When the student and the faculty member have agreed on the work to be done, the student submits the plan to the director of undergraduate programs for approval and registration. Usually students will work independently and produce a research paper, under the direction of the faculty member.
Special Studies in Literature, ENGL 399, TBA, cas, English, Cragwall, Summer Session A, B
ENVS 223: Soil Ecology Session: Early Instructor: Valencia Mestre
This course introduces the properties, functions, and conservation of soil. Topics include belowground ecosystem services, soil biodiversity, biogeochemical cycles, and conservation, human impacts on soils, and the socioeconomic implications of soil degradation. Lectures, laboratory/field soil testing, field trips, and presentations by experts in sustainable soil management are employed.
Soil Ecology, ENVS 223, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, Fri, ies, Institute of Environmental Sustainability , Valencia Mestre , Summer Session Early
ENVS 224: Climate & Climate Change Session: A Instructor: DiMaio
This course introduces students to basic principles and knowledge to explain climate change. Students will learn about natural and anthropogenic causes of climate change, the interactions between earth-atmosphere-ocean systems, climate feedback mechanisms, and impacts of climate change on the natural physical environment.
Climate & Climate Change , ENVS 224, Mon, Wed, ies, Institute of Environmental Sustainability , DiMaio, Summer Session A
ENVS 224: Climate Change Session: A Instructor: Richard DiMaio
This course introduces students to basic principles and knowledge to explain climate change. Students will learn about natural and anthropogenic causes of climate change, the interactions between earth-atmosphere-ocean systems, climate feedback mechanisms, and impacts of climate change on the natural physical environment. Outcome: Students will develop cognitive and mathematical skills to draw valid, logical conclusions regarding various observed phenomena such as observed changes in the climate system and observed impacts of climate change.
Climate Change, ENVS 224, Tue, scps, Richard DiMaio, Summer Session A
ENVS 280: Principles of Ecology Session: Early Instructor: Dybzinski
The purpose of this course is to foster an in-depth understanding of ecology, the study of relationships between organisms and the environment at organizational scales ranging from genes, individuals, and populations to communities, ecosystems, and landscapes. Topics include population dynamics, species interactions, community dynamics, food webs, ecosystem functions, and landscape ecology with a strong emphasis on scientific inquiry and data interpretation. Outcome: Students will understand key concepts and principles concerning ecological processes in nature at the gene, individual, population, community, ecosystem and landscape scales and apply knowledge of ecological concepts to current environmental challenges.
Principles of Ecology, ENVS 280, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, Fri, ies, Environmental Science , Dybzinski, Summer Session Early
ENVS 330: Restoration Ecology Session: Early Instructor: Ohsowski
This course provides a theoretical and practical basis for the increasing global efforts to reverse damage caused by humans to ecosystems and species, emphasizing the many perspectives (e.g., ecological, social, political, engineering) that must be considered to develop, implement, and assess restoration projects across a range of ecosystem types.
Restoration Ecology , ENVS 330, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, Fri, ies, Institute of Environmental Sustainability , Ohsowski, Summer Session Early
ENVS 283-01E: Environmental Sustainability (Engaged Learning Section) Instructor: Nancy Landrum
This course examines the impact of humans as consumers on the environment and how these interactions affect the probability of establishing sustainability for human and non-humans on Earth. Outcome: Students will become skilled in critical reasoning and methods of inquiry, and demonstrate an understanding of knowledge critical to the field including current human consumptive practices and their effects on the health and well-being of living organisms.
Environmental Sustainability (Engaged Learning Section), ENVS 283-01E, Tue, Thurs, ies, Nancy Landrum,
ENVS 391: Environmental Research Session: A, B, C Instructor: Various
Students may register for independent research on a topic mutually acceptable to the student and any professor in the department. Usually, this research is directed to a particular course or to the research of the professor.
Environmental Research , ENVS 391, TBA, ies, Institute of Environmental Sustainability , Various, Summer Session A, B, C
ENVS 391c: Environmental Research (Capstone) Session: A, B, C Instructor: Various
This course fulfills the capstone requirement for IES majors. Through independent research experience, examine how scientific, sociological, economic and political knowledge and perspectives interact and define environmental problems and solutions/mitigation efforts. Research projects must use a multi-disciplinary perspective in analysis and interpretation.
Environmental Research (Capstone), ENVS 391c, TBA, ies, Institute of Environmental Sustainability , Various, Summer Session A, B, C
ENVS 395: Environmental Internship Session: A, B, C Instructor: Various
Students seek out and engage in a semester- or summer-long internship with a civic, business, governmental, or academic group providing hands-on experience in work on environmental issues.
Environmental Internship, ENVS 395, TBA, ies, Institute of Environmental Sustainability , Various, Summer Session A, B, C
ENVS 395c: Environmental Internship (Capstone) Session: A, B, C Instructor: Peterson
Fulfills capstone requirement for IES majors. Through internship experience, students reflect upon academic and extra-curricular activities in their degree program and learn how scientific, sociological, economic and political knowledge and perspectives interact and define environmental problems and solutions/mitigation efforts.
Environmental Internship (Capstone), ENVS 395c, TBA, ies, Institute of Environmental Sustainability , Peterson, Summer Session A, B, C
ENVS 399: Directed Readings Session: A, B, C Instructor: Various
Students will read, analyze, and discuss publications focusing on different aspects of a specific environmental issue or theme, and will demonstrate comprehension of, and the ability to apply information from, scientific literature and be able to synthesize information to produce a cogent, synthetic analysis of their topic based on these readings.
Directed Readings, ENVS 399, TBA, ies, Institute of Environmental Sustainability , Various, Summer Session A, B, C
FINC 301: Introductory Business Finance Session: A Instructor: Kolb
The objective of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the general principles of business finance: capital investment, financing, capital structure, and related areas including the basics of valuation. Students will demonstrate basic knowledge of financial analysis, time value of money, financial decision making, the valuation of financial and physical assets, the risk-return tradeoff, capital budgeting, and dividend policy.
Introductory Business Finance, FINC 301, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Finance, Kolb, Summer Session A
FINC 334: Principles of Corporate Finance Session: A Instructor: Kolb
This course provides students with a foundational and integrated knowledge of corporate finance. Topics include discounted cash flows, firm valuation, capital budgeting, principals of the risk and return relationship, market efficiency, capital structure, and financing. Students will will be asked to independently complete the Bloomberg Market Concepts (BMC) course. Students will demonstrate knowledge of valuation principles, raising funds for investment decisions, capital investment choices, risk and return relationship, capital markets and instruments, all in the context of real-world problems and situations
Principles of Corporate Finance, FINC 334, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Finance, Kolb, Summer Session A
FINC 335: Investments Session: B Instructor: TBA
This course is an introductory course of capital market theory, which includes the topics of risk and return analysis of stocks, bonds and cash equivalents; modern portfolio theory; bond pricing, the term structure of interest. Students will be able to demonstrate the analytical tools and finance theory necessary for making good investment decisions and for understanding the pricing of financial securities.
Investments, FINC 335, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Finance, TBA, Summer Session B
FINC 346: Introduction to Options Session: B Instructor: TBA
This class offers a comprehensive introduction to options, including a detailed examination of option markets, option properties, trading strategies using options, binomial tree and Black-Scholes valuation models, and hedging strategies using options. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of option markets, option pricing models, and how options can be used to hedge risks.
Introduction to Options, FINC 346, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Finance, TBA, Summer Session B
FNAR 113: Drawing I Session: B Instructor: Rafael Vera
An introduction to the basic elements of drawing including: line, value, texture, volume, shape, proportion, perspective and visual composition. A variety of drawing materials will be explored with an emphasis on observation problems designed to build technical, perceptual, and personal expressive interpretation of form through the drawing idiom. . Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic drawing principles and vocabulary, through practice and articulation of both formal and artistic ideas.
Drawing I, FNAR 113, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, Rafael Vera, Summer Session B
FNAR 114: Painting I Session: B Instructor: Vera
An introduction to the basic elements of painting including: the application of drawing, design, and color principles. A variety of materials will be explored with an emphasis on oil painting. Observational problems will be introduced to build technical, perceptual, and personal expressive interpretation of form through the painting idiom. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic painting principles and vocabulary, through practice and articulation of both formal and artistic ideas.
Painting I, FNAR 114, Tue, Thurs, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, Vera, Summer Session B
FNAR 115: Foundations of Photography Session: A Instructor: Murray
An introduction to the basic equipment, materials, processes, and philosophy of black and white photography. Students learn control of the camera and printing processes as well as the verbal skills necessary to understand and appreciate the nature of the medium and its function as a means of communication and fine art. An adjustable 35mm camera is required.
Foundations of Photography, FNAR 115, Mon, Wed, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, Murray, Summer Session A
FNAR 399: Independent Study Session: A Instructor: Vera
Advanced student are afforded the opportunity to work on an in-depth project in the medium of his/her choice in a tutorial setting. The course is developed in consultation with a faculty advisor and is stated formally in a written contract of definition, goals, procedures and outcomes. Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to produce a significant body of original artwork on a focused theme.
Independent Study, FNAR 399, TBA, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, Vera, Summer Session A
FNAR 399: Independent Study Session: B Instructor: Vera
Advanced student are afforded the opportunity to work on an in-depth project in the medium of his/her choice in a tutorial setting. The course is developed in consultation with a faculty advisor and is stated formally in a written contract of definition, goals, procedures and outcomes. Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to produce a significant body of original artwork on a focused theme.
Independent Study, FNAR 399, TBA, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, Vera, Summer Session B
FREN 101: French I Session: A Instructor: Erceg
Taught in French, faculty member instructs basic communicative French, the people and cultures where it is spoken, using formal and informal registers, and speaking in present and future time. Students will listen and respond, read and write, ask and answer simple questions in basic functional French. The content will focus on personal topics and everyday living. At the end of the course, students will successfully interpret and express needs pertaining to home, work, college, leisure, and dining. Achievement level desired: Novice Low, American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL*) standards.
French I, FREN 101, TBA, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Erceg, Summer Session A
FREN 102: French II Session: B Instructor: Erceg
Taught in French, this course is a continuation of basic French inter-communication skills both producing French (speaking and writing), and interpreting French (listening and reading). The aim is to comprehend and contribute to discussions about families, housing, sports, travel, and traditions in French. At the end of the course, students will comprehend and speak in present, future, and past narrative; get and give simple direction; share personal information. Achievement level desired: ACTFL* Novice Low to Mid.
French II, FREN 102, TBA, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Erceg, Summer Session B
FREN 369: French Reading Knowledge Session: B Instructor: Posner
This course will prepare students for reading and conducting research in French. Fundamentals of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary essential to reading competence will be covered, using materials drawn from a wide range of fields. Offered for graduate students preparing to satisfy foreign language reading requirements.
French Reading Knowledge, FREN 369, Tue, Thurs, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Posner, Summer Session B
FRSC 390: Forensic Science Internship Session: C Instructor: Bombard
The purpose of this course is to enhance the student's development and learning through observational and participatory experience in forensic focused criminal justice agencies. Students will be able to contribute in a meaningful way to the operation of a specific forensic focused criminal justice agency and be able to identify and describe the link between their field experience and prior courses.
Forensic Science Internship, FRSC 390, TBA, cas, Forensic Science, Bombard, Summer Session C
GERM 369: German Reading Knowledge Session: A Instructor: Andress
This course provides graduate students in the humanities, arts, and social sciences with the fundamentals of German grammar for the purposes of reading and translating academic German. During the first five weeks of the course, we will work through German grammar explanations, vocabulary, strategies for negotiating meaning and translation exercises. During the last week, students will work on translating a text from German into English pertinent to their particular area of academic interest.
German Reading Knowledge, GERM 369, Mon, Thurs, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Andress, Summer Session A
GIST 370: Internship Session: C Instructor: Hasselmann
Students earn course credit while serving as an intern in government agencies, non-profit organizations, and businesses relevant to the field of international studies. Students will obtain in-depth knowledge and practical experience in a professional work setting relevant to the student’s future career path.
Internship, GIST 370, TBA, cas, Global and International Studies, Hasselmann, Summer Session C
GIST 399: Directed Readings Session: A, B Instructor: Pintchman
This course offers an independent program of research under the direction of a faculty sponsor leading to a major research paper. Students will hone research and writing skills in close collaboration with a faculty sponsor.
Directed Readings, GIST 399, TBA, cas, Global and International Studies, Pintchman, Summer Session A, B
HIST 102: Evolution of Western Ideas & Institutions since 17th C. Session: A, B Instructor: Dennis
This course traces the development of western civilization and its global impact since the 17th century to the present. Students will gain an understanding of history as a discipline, developing critical thinking skills based on historical knowledge about key people, places and events that shaped the modern world.
Evolution of Western Ideas & Institutions since 17th C., HIST 102, TBA, cas, History, Dennis, Summer Session A, B
HIST 102: Evolution of Western Ideas & Institutions since 17th C. Session: A Instructor: Suszko
This course traces the development of western civilization and its global impact since the 17th century to the present. Students will gain an understanding of history as a discipline, developing critical thinking skills based on historical knowledge about key people, places and events that shaped the modern world.
Evolution of Western Ideas & Institutions since 17th C., HIST 102, TBA, cas, History, Suszko, Summer Session A
HIST 102: Evolution of Western Ideas & Institutions since 17th C. Session: B Instructor: Hajdarpasic
This course traces the development of western civilization and its global impact since the 17th century to the present. Students will gain an understanding of history as a discipline, developing critical thinking skills based on historical knowledge about key people, places and events that shaped the modern world.
Evolution of Western Ideas & Institutions since 17th C., HIST 102, TBA, cas, History, Hajdarpasic, Summer Session B
HIST 102: Evolution of Western Ideas & Institutions since 17th C. Session: B Instructor: Clay
This course traces the development of western civilization and its global impact since the 17th century to the present. Students will gain an understanding of history as a discipline, developing critical thinking skills based on historical knowledge about key people, places and events that shaped the modern world.
Evolution of Western Ideas & Institutions since 17th C., HIST 102, TBA, cas, History, Clay, Summer Session B
HIST 104: Global History since 1500 Session: A Instructor: Khodarkovsky
This course deals with the emergence of the modern world, and can focus on such topics as the expansion and intensification of cross-cultural interaction (imperialism, colonialism, and nationalism); the spread of information (capitalism, industrialism, and popular sovereignty); race and ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic status. Students will be able to evaluate and explain the forces of historical continuity and change; demonstrate how the encounters/changes between and among societies produced the world we have today; analyze and discuss the significance of primary and secondary sources and how they relate to the history under discussion.
Global History since 1500, HIST 104, TBA, cas, History, Khodarkovsky, Summer Session A
HIST 209: Survey of Islamic History Session: A Instructor: Searcy
The course will introduce the historical development of Islamic civilization and the formation of Muslim social and political institutions from the 7th century to the present. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the historical development and diversity of Islamic beliefs, practices, and institutions in varied regional contexts and
Survey of Islamic History, HIST 209, TBA, cas, History, Searcy, Summer Session A
HIST 212: American History since 1865 Session: A Instructor: Andrew Wilson
This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the colonial era through the Civil War. Students will demonstrate an understanding of Native American societies, the impact of European colonization, the creation and evolution of democratic institutions in a multicultural society, the geographic expansion of the United States, and the impact of slavery.
American History since 1865, HIST 212, TBA, cas, History, Andrew Wilson, Summer Session A
HIST 212: American History since 1865 Session: A Instructor: Peter Kotowski
This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the colonial era through the Civil War. Students will demonstrate an understanding of Native American societies, the impact of European colonization, the creation and evolution of democratic institutions in a multicultural society, the geographic expansion of the United States, and the impact of slavery.
American History since 1865, HIST 212, TBA, cas, History, Peter Kotowski, Summer Session A
HIST 212: American History since 1865 Session: B Instructor: Kelly O'Connor
This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the colonial era through the Civil War. Students will demonstrate an understanding of Native American societies, the impact of European colonization, the creation and evolution of democratic institutions in a multicultural society, the geographic expansion of the United States, and the impact of slavery.
American History since 1865, HIST 212, TBA, cas, History, Kelly O'Connor, Summer Session B
HIST 212: American History since 1865 Session: B Instructor: Hope Shannon
This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the colonial era through the Civil War. Students will demonstrate an understanding of Native American societies, the impact of European colonization, the creation and evolution of democratic institutions in a multicultural society, the geographic expansion of the United States, and the impact of slavery.
American History since 1865 , HIST 212, TBA, cas, History, Hope Shannon, Summer Session B
HIST 212: United States Since 1865 Session: B Instructor: Sara Piotrowski
This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the Civil War to the present. Outcome: Students will demonstrate an understanding of how the United States became a modern industrial society, the emergence and evolution of the modern welfare state, the rise of the United States as a global power, and the impact of controversies over civil rights and liberties on American society.
United States Since 1865, HIST 212, TBA, scps, Sara Piotrowski, Summer Session B
HIST 398: History Internship Session: A, B Instructor: Mooney-Melvin
Students can find more information about internships through the Department of History: www.luc.edu/history. Internships allow students to earn three course credits while gaining valuable professional experience in public and private institutions engaged in history-related projects. Internship possibilities include historical associations and societies; oral history projects; museums and halls of fame; entrepreneurial history firms; genealogical services; preservation agencies; and archives and libraries. Interns work for a minimum of five hours per week in an internship position jointly agreed upon by the student and the internship director. Interns are also required to attend seminar meetings, keep a weekly journal, and write a paper related to the internship experience. This course fulfills the Civic Engagement and Leadership Values requirement of the core curriculum.
History Internship, HIST 398, TBA, cas, History, Mooney-Melvin, Summer Session A, B
HIST 399: Directed Study Session: A, B Instructor: Stabler
This course provides students with the opportunity to work under the direction of a faculty member on a particular area of interest that is not part of the department’s usual curriculum. Students will gain an understanding of a specific area of history through the close reading of selected texts and the preparation of a research paper.
Directed Study, HIST 399, TBA, cas, History, Stabler, Summer Session A, B
INFS 247: Business Information Systems Session: A Instructor: TBA
This course studies methods for analyzing, developing and implementing business information systems. Stages of the systems development life cycle are explored in depth. Tools and techniques for structured and object-oriented analysis and design are discussed. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of statistical thinking and data analysis technique for decision-making purposes. Outcome: Understanding of the development and implementation of business information systems.
Business Information Systems, INFS 247, TBA, quinlan, Information Systems and Supply Chain Management, TBA, Summer Session A
ISSCM 241: ISSCM 241 - Business Statistics Session: A Instructor: TBA
This course examines the steps and procedures required to solve problems in science, social science, and business where data are useful - from the definition of the managerial problems to the use of statistical analysis to address these problems.
ISSCM 241 - Business Statistics, ISSCM 241, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Information Systems and Supply Chain Management, TBA, Summer Session A
ISSCM 393: Requirements and Analysis and Communication Session: A Instructor: TBA
This course focuses on Information Systems requirements and related communication skills. Students will learn how to gather requirements for Information Systems from an organization¿s users and executives based on a general understanding of organizations and business goals. Students learn techniques of how to translate between organizational needs and requirements for systems and processes, and how to analyze, validate, and prioritize those requirements. A special focus of the course will be to improve business communication skills such as interviewing, listening, presenting and negotiating.
Requirements and Analysis and Communication, ISSCM 393, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Information Systems and Supply Chain Management, TBA, Summer Session A
ITAL 101: Italian I Session: A Instructor: Martinez
This course provides an introduction to the basic grammatical elements of Italian, promoting the development of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills while examining the geography and culture of Italy. Students will be able to understand and write basic Italian sentences and to produce orally and in writing short sentences providing basic personal information about themselves, their activities and plans in Italian.
Italian I, ITAL 101, TBA, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Martinez, Summer Session A
ITAL 101: Italian I Session: B Instructor: Rosemonde Gurtner JFRC
This course provides an introduction to the basic grammatical elements of Italian, promoting the development of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing skills while examining the geography and culture of Italy .
Italian I , ITAL 101, TBA, Rosemonde Gurtner , Summer Session B ,JFRC
ITAL 102: Italian II Session: B Instructor: Defraia
This course continues the introduction to the basic grammatical elements of Italian, promoting the further development of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing skills while examining the geography and culture of Italy. Students will be able to understand and write basic Italian sentences and to produce orally and in writing short sentences providing basic personal information about themselves, their activities and plans in Italian.
Italian II , ITAL 102, TBA, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Defraia, Summer Session B
LITR 245-WI: Asian Masterpieces Session: B Instructor: Trowbridge
This course will study masterpieces of Asian literature in a variety of literary genres in their cultural context. Outcomes: Students will gain a significant understanding of how Asian literary works reflect their Asian cultural context.
Asian Masterpieces, LITR 245-WI, TBA, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Trowbridge, Summer Session B
LITR 280-WI: World Masterpieces in Translation Session: A Instructor: Merchant
This course will study literary masterpieces, in translation, of a selected culture or nation.
World Masterpieces in Translation, LITR 280-WI, Mon, Wed, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Merchant, Summer Session A
LREB 315: Law and the Regulatory Environment of Business I Session: A, B Instructor: TBA
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the American legal system. Intended primarily for students who have not previously studied law, the course includes a review of the concept of law, the function of the courts, and the dual judicial system of the United States. An appreciation of legal history and the operation of law are developed through the vehicle of a detailed analysis of contract law and a survey of other topical headings. The students should achieve an awareness of the necessity of voluntary compliance with general legal concepts in order for society to enable all persons to live together in harmony. An understanding of the court system as a substitute for self-help is deemed essential and knowledge of binding contract law is fostered as a basis for all agreements.
Law and the Regulatory Environment of Business I , LREB 315, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Accounting and Business Law, TBA, Summer Session A, B
MARK 201: Principles of Marketing Session: B Instructor: TBA
This course develops an understanding of the marketing systems by which organizations plan, price, promote and distribute products and services to selected target markets. Students analyze market conditions and apply the basic tools to develop marketing strategies to successfully meet the customers' needs resulting in a viable, profitable organization.
Principles of Marketing, MARK 201, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Marketing, TBA, Summer Session B
MARK 360: Retailing Management Session: B Instructor: TBA
This course develops an understanding of retailing and the role that retailing plays in the marketing system and in marketing strategies. Students analyze and develop retail strategies that fit and support overall marketing strategies.
Retailing Management, MARK 360, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Marketing, TBA, Summer Session B
MATH 117: Precalculus I Session: A Instructor: Law
This course covers algebraic topics ranging from functions and their applications to complex numbers to inverse functions to the fundamental theorem of algebra. Students who plan to study calculus will obtain the algebraic background needed to enroll in precalculus.
Precalculus I, MATH 117, Tue, Thurs, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Law, Summer Session A
MATH 117: Precalculus I Session: B Instructor: Hermann
This course covers algebraic topics ranging from functions and their applications to complex numbers to inverse functions to the fundamental theorem of algebra. Students who plan to study calculus will obtain the algebraic background needed to enroll in precalculus.
Precalculus I, MATH 117, Mon, Wed, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Hermann, Summer Session B
MATH 118: Precalculus II Session: A Instructor: Krueger
Functions and change with an emphasis on linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their graphs. Specific geometric topics include concavity and how transformations affect graphs. Topics in trigonometry include radians, sinusoidal functions, identities, sum/difference formulas, double/half angle formulas and trigonometric equations. Other topics include polar coordinates.
Precalculus II, MATH 118, Mon, Wed, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Krueger, Summer Session A
MATH 118: Precalculus II Session: B Instructor: Podolny
Functions and change with an emphasis on linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their graphs. Specific geometric topics include concavity and how transformations affect graphs. Topics in trigonometry include radians, sinusoidal functions, identities, sum/difference formulas, double/half angle formulas and trigonometric equations. Other topics include polar coordinates.
Precalculus II, MATH 118, Tue, Thurs, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Podolny, Summer Session B
MATH 131: Applied Calculus I Session: A Instructor: Bourque
This course is an introduction to differential and integral calculus, with an emphasis on applications. This course is intended for students in the life and social sciences, computer science, and business. Topics include: modeling change using functions including exponential and trigonometric functions, the concept of the derivative, computing the derivative, applications of the derivative to business and life, social and computer sciences, and an introduction to integration. Students will obtain an understanding of calculus and methods for applying calculus (especially differential calculus), including modeling/analyzing processes (such as population growth and cooling), interpreting the derivative (numerical, graphical, and algebraic), and optimization (such as finding the time and level for a peak drug concentration).
Applied Calculus I, MATH 131, Tue, Thurs, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Bourque, Summer Session A
MATH 131: Applied Calculus I Session: A Instructor: Wick
This course is an introduction to differential and integral calculus, with an emphasis on applications. This course is intended for students in the life and social sciences, computer science, and business. Topics include: modeling change using functions including exponential and trigonometric functions, the concept of the derivative, computing the derivative, applications of the derivative to business and life, social and computer sciences, and an introduction to integration. Students will obtain an understanding of calculus and methods for applying calculus (especially differential calculus), including modeling/analyzing processes (such as population growth and cooling), interpreting the derivative (numerical, graphical, and algebraic), and optimization (such as finding the time and level for a peak drug concentration).
Applied Calculus I, MATH 131, Mon, Wed, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Wick, Summer Session A
MATH 131: Applied Calculus I Session: B Instructor: Houlihan
This course is an introduction to differential and integral calculus, with an emphasis on applications. This course is intended for students in the life and social sciences, computer science, and business. Topics include: modeling change using functions including exponential and trigonometric functions, the concept of the derivative, computing the derivative, applications of the derivative to business and life, social and computer sciences, and an introduction to integration. Students will obtain an understanding of calculus and methods for applying calculus (especially differential calculus), including modeling/analyzing processes (such as population growth and cooling), interpreting the derivative (numerical, graphical, and algebraic), and optimization (such as finding the time and level for a peak drug concentration).
Applied Calculus I, MATH 131, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Houlihan, Summer Session B
MATH 132: Applied Calculus II Session: B Instructor: Radulescu
This course is a continuation of Mathematics 131. Topics include: definition and interpretations of the integral (numerically, graphically, and algebraically), basic techniques for computing anti-derivatives, applications to probability, an introduction to multi-variable calculus and optimization for functions of several variables, and mathematical modeling using differential equations. (This course is not a substitute for MATH 162.) Students will obtain an understanding of integral and multi-variable calculus, including modeling/analyzing processes with the integral, optimization of functions of several variables, and modeling with differential equations.
Applied Calculus II, MATH 132, Tue, Thurs, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Radulescu, Summer Session B
MATH 161: Calculus I Session: A Instructor: London
A traditional introduction to differential and integral calculus. Functions, limits, continuity, differentiation, intermediate and mean-value theorems, curve sketching, optimization problems, related rates, definite and indefinite integrals, fundamental theorem of calculus, logarithmic and exponential functions. Applications to physics and other disciplines.
Calculus I, MATH 161, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, London, Summer Session A
MATH 162: Calculus II Session: B Instructor: Del Greco
A continuation of Math 161. Calculus of logarithmic, exponential, inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic functions. Techniques of integration. Applications of integration to volume, surface area, arc length, center of mass and work. Numerical sequences and series. Study of power series and the theory of convergence. Study of Taylor's theorem with remainder.
Calculus II, MATH 162, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Del Greco, Summer Session B
MATH 398: Independent Study in Mathematics Session: A, B Instructor: Del Greco
This course allows students to engage in independent study on selected topics in mathematics under the supervision of a faculty member. Students will obtain an understanding of an advanced topic in their major.
Independent Study in Mathematics, MATH 398, TBA, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Del Greco, Summer Session A, B
MGMT 201: Managing People and Organizations Session: A Instructor: TBA
This course introduces students to the dynamics of human behavior in the workplace through the study of such topics as perception, learning, motivation, leadership and group behavior.
Managing People and Organizations, MGMT 201, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Management, TBA, Summer Session A
MGMT 304: Strategic Management Session: A Instructor: TBA
This is a capstone course that analyzes the responsibilities of general management in formulating, communicating and implementing a strategic plan. Through case studies, the course applies the principles of strategic analysis to business situations so as to integrate all of the core courses in the undergraduate business program. Students will develop executive and general management skills through an understanding of how the various functions of an organization operate as a whole. Students will also build their skills in conducting strategic analyses in a variety of industries and competitive situations and gain a stronger understanding of the competitive challenges of the market environment.
Strategic Management, MGMT 304, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Management, TBA, Summer Session A
MGMT 304: Strategic Management Session: B Instructor: TBA
This is a capstone course that analyzes the responsibilities of general management in formulating, communicating and implementing a strategic plan. Through case studies, the course applies the principles of strategic analysis to business situations so as to integrate all of the core courses in the undergraduate business program. Students will develop executive and general management skills through an understanding of how the various functions of an organization operate as a whole. Students will also build their skills in conducting strategic analyses in a variety of industries and competitive situations and gain a stronger understanding of the competitive challenges of the market environment.
Strategic Management, MGMT 304, Tue, Thurs, quinlan, Marketing, TBA, Summer Session B
MGMT 318: Organizational Development and Change Session: A Instructor: Kyhos
This course examines the theory and practice of organizational development and change, with an emphasis on effective change management. Students will understand the complexity of change in organizations and learn how to use change interventions to manage different types of organizational changes, including the redesign of jobs and restructuring.
Organizational Development and Change , MGMT 318, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Management, Kyhos, Summer Session A
MGMT 341: Ethics in Business Session: A Instructor: TBD
This course focuses on ethical issues in the world of business and commerce and addresses a number of interrelated questions. These questions include: What are the rights and obligations of business in society? Can businesses "do good" and "do well"? Are business ethics a viable goal or an unachievable ideal?
Ethics in Business, MGMT 341, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Management, TBD, Summer Session A
MGMT 341: Ethics in Business Session: B Instructor: TBD
This course focuses on ethical issues in the world of business and commerce and addresses a number of interrelated questions. These questions include: What are the rights and obligations of business in society? Can businesses "do good" and "do well"? Are business ethics a viable goal or an unachievable ideal?
Ethics in Business, MGMT 341, Mon, Wed, quinlan, Management, TBD, Summer Session B
MPBH 495-010 / HSM 355-007: Animal Origins of COVID-19 and Other Pandemics: Implications for Preventing Future Pandemics Session: C Instructor: Harbison
Diseases like COVID-19, The “Spanish” Flu of 1918, SARS, and Zika are suspected or confirmed to have originated in animals. These diseases highlight the connections between animal and human health. To prevent and reduce the risk of these pandemics, it is important to leverage a broad array of expertise, including human and veterinary medicine, agriculture, epidemiology, and ecology. This course will examine how humans become infected with animal pathogens and students will learn from past successful and less successful efforts to prevent epidemics originating in animals.
Animal Origins of COVID-19 and Other Pandemics: Implications for Preventing Future Pandemics, MPBH 495-010 / HSM 355-007, Mon, parkinson, Public Health, Health Care Administration, Harbison, Summer Session C
MPBH 495-011 / HSM 355-008: Managing Emerging Infectious Disease: Clinical Laboratory Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic; Session: C Instructor: Dr. Kamran Mirza
The sudden emergence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus sparked world-wide demand for testing to confirm a diagnosis of COVID-19 disease. Medical Laboratory Scientists are specially trained healthcare professionals, certified to provide data that assist in diagnosis, treatment, monitoring and prevention of disease. Collaborations between Microbiologists, Hematologists, Chemists, and Molecular Specialists provide the objective criteria for diagnosis while Immunologists and Immunohematologists guide potential treatment and vaccination movements. In this course, students will explore the efforts of Medical Laboratory Scientists and the clinical laboratories that make up the backbone behind the development, validation, and performance of testing needed to identify those infected by the virus and displaying biomarkers for the more serious disease. Students will participate in discussions on utility of Laboratory Developed Tests, the process for obtaining emergency use authorization by laboratories and commercial manufacturers in the face of novel disease, as well as criteria for convalescent plasma therapies.
Managing Emerging Infectious Disease: Clinical Laboratory Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic; , MPBH 495-011 / HSM 355-008, Fri, parkinson, Medical Lab Sciences, Public Health, Health Sciences, Dr. Kamran Mirza, Summer Session C
MPBH 495-004 / HSM 355 - 001: Public Health 101: Fundamentals of Emergency Preparedness and Management Session: B Instructor: Kafensztok
Pandemics and other natural or human caused disasters will inflict varying levels of population health harm and disrupt “life as usual.” While the “unknown” is a factor in these events, the degree of built community resilience, and the robustness of health systems infrastructure prepared for rapid deployment in times of crisis are critical factors to reduce the severity of health outcomes. In this course, students will become familiar with the framework and basic concepts of public health emergency planning and management. Using practice-based examples, the instructor will outline the phases of public health emergency management (i.e., mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery), along with the public health and healthcare system infrastructure and capacity to address these acute events.
Public Health 101: Fundamentals of Emergency Preparedness and Management, MPBH 495-004 / HSM 355 - 001, Tue, parkinson, Public Health/Health Care Administration , Kafensztok , Summer Session B
MPBH 495-5 / HSM 355-002: Health Care Essentials for Crisis Preparedness and Management Session: C Instructor: Brady
The ability to respond nimbly to an emerging situation is a critical competency for any healthcare leader. Effective leaders have a process to evaluate how a crisis impacts all aspects of an organization – from revising daily operations, to ongoing reputation management, all the way through a return to normal day-to-day business. In this course, students will participate in activities to develop skills to analyze the larger situation and discern how external factors may influence the ability of their organization to remain viable. Using the format of an extended “table-top disaster drill,” students will learn the project management skills (e.g., incorporating risk mitigation, strategic planning, communication, organizational decision-making, and general operational management) required to succeed in an emergency situation.
Health Care Essentials for Crisis Preparedness and Management, MPBH 495-5 / HSM 355-002, Thurs, parkinson, Public Health/Health Care Administration, Brady, Summer Session C
MPBH 495-006 / HSM 355-003: The Power of Public Health Surveillance: The Engine for Evidence-based Policy Making Session: C Instructor: Kafensztok, Mora, and Silva
Epidemiology is the basic science of public health; public health surveillance is the cornerstone of epidemiology. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, public health surveillance is the “ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of health-related data essential to planning, implementation, and evaluation of public health practice, closely integrated with the timely dissemination of these data to those responsible for prevention and control.” Students will learn about public health informatics and surveillance systems, including an overview of data collection methods and data storage systems. In addition, students will gain an understanding of issues related to analyzing and interpreting surveillance data and the communication of outcomes that may be used in local, state, or federal policies. Finally, the instructor will engage the class in discussions about sustaining active surveillance of the coronavirus in developed and developing nations.
The Power of Public Health Surveillance: The Engine for Evidence-based Policy Making, MPBH 495-006 / HSM 355-003, Tue, parkinson, Public Health/Health Care Administration, Kafensztok, Mora, and Silva, Summer Session C
MPBH 495-007 / HSM 355-004: The Ethical, Legal and Political Lessons of Addressing the COVID-19 Pandemic in the U.S Session: B Instructor: Swartzman
In a public health crisis, leaders and public policy makers must confront the ethical and legal implications of actions (and in-actions?) including impacts on population health, economic vitality, and the social and political will to follow emergency policies. This course will explore current and emerging U.S. policy decisions affecting the COVID-19 pandemic such as, quarantine power and social distancing requirements; closure of schools and non-essential businesses; and the Food and Drug Administration’s emergency use authorization power. Discussion will focus on separation of powers and coordination between federal, state, and local authorities during a public health emergency and ethical considerations of policy-making given uncertain data and the importance of legitimacy in the making of policy decisions. We will explore lessons learned to date and implications for moving forward.
The Ethical, Legal and Political Lessons of Addressing the COVID-19 Pandemic in the U.S, MPBH 495-007 / HSM 355-004, Mon, parkinson, Public Health, Health Care Administration, Swartzman, Summer Session B
MPBH 495-008 / HSM 355-005: Syndemics: The Sociodemographic, Economic and Environmental Factors Fueling COVID-19 Health Disparities Session: B Instructor: Dugas and Mora
A syndemic is the dynamic relationship and synergy between clusters of two or more coexisting epidemics and the factors that precipitate their interaction within a population. Understanding and tackling syndemics require the recognition that diseases rarely exist in isolation. Identification of the common social, political, economic, and ecological factors that are driving poor health is necessary for identifying effective health policies and programs to reduce health inequity. This course will specifically examine the dynamic relationship between COVID-19 (an infectious disease epidemic) and non-commutable chronic diseases (like the obesity and diabetes epidemics) and the social determinants that interconnect them both and fuels health disparities. Concepts will be illustrated using strategies and case studies of disease syndemics with a focus on application for addressing the COVID-19 pandemic and emerging health disparities.
Syndemics: The Sociodemographic, Economic and Environmental Factors Fueling COVID-19 Health Disparities, MPBH 495-008 / HSM 355-005, Tue, parkinson, Public Health, Health Care Administration, Dugas and Mora, Summer Session B
MPBH 495-009 / HSM 355-006: Social Networks in the Age of COVID-19: from Personal Networks to Big Data Session: C Instructor: Shoham
Social network analysis for epidemiology (sometimes called “Network Epidemiology”) is the study of how peoples’ connections to one another determine their health. Students will be introduced to concepts and case studies from social network analysis, including theoretical foundations in social science, to understand social epidemics like opioid abuse and gun violence and the unfolding COVID-19 pandemic. Discussion will focus on application of social network analysis for understanding the spread and prevention of the COVID-19 pandemic, with particular focus on evaluating the effectiveness of social distancing policies. Relative strengths and limitations of data sources will be compared, including personal data networks, geospatial data from mobile phones, Twitter data, public health surveillance data, and mashups of individual clinical data with Census and other large datasets.
Social Networks in the Age of COVID-19: from Personal Networks to Big Data, MPBH 495-009 / HSM 355-006, Wed, parkinson, Public Health, Health Care Administration, Shoham, Summer Session C
MUSC 101: Art of Listening Session: A Instructor: Lowe
Focus is on the acquisition and enhancement of listening skills through direct experience of musical works along with an examination of cross-cultural similarities and differences among musical styles. Concert attendance is required.
Art of Listening, MUSC 101, TBA, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, Lowe, Summer Session A
MUSC 102: Beginning Class Piano Session: A Instructor: Kang
For the student who has never had keyboard instruction and is interested in learning the art of performance on the piano. Fundamentals of music theory, note reading and personal enjoyment are emphasized. Strongly recommended for those preparing to teach music in elementary school. Students will learn a basic keyboard ability with an emphasis on reading music symbols accurately while also enjoying the making and doing of music.
Beginning Class Piano, MUSC 102, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, Kang, Summer Session A
MUSC 102: Beginning Class Piano Session: B Instructor: Hwang
For the student who has never had keyboard instruction and is interested in learning the art of performance on the piano. Fundamentals of music theory, note reading and personal enjoyment are emphasized. Strongly recommended for those preparing to teach music in elementary school. Students will learn a basic keyboard ability with an emphasis on reading music symbols accurately while also enjoying the making and doing of music.
Beginning Class Piano, MUSC 102, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, Hwang, Summer Session B
MUSC 280AA: Applied Music: Conducting Session: A Instructor: Lowe
Twelve 30-minute individual lessons in conducting. Topics include: baton techniques, gestural mechanics, ear training, score study, transpositions, orchestrational basics, phrasing, and chord recognition. Choral, orchestral, or wind band considerations will be explored in greater detail, according to the background of the student. Outcome: Advanced skills in conducting both small and large ensembles, score study, rehearsal, and concert programming.
Applied Music: Conducting, MUSC 280AA, TBA, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, Lowe, Summer Session A
MUSC 280J: Applied Music: Piano Session: A Instructor: Kang
Individualized instruction in piano. Performance opportunities; performance class, hearing before faculty, optional musicale and/or recital. May be repeated for to 8 credit hours. Students will have functional to advanced performance ability based on skills development, repertoire expansion, and enhancement
Applied Music: Piano, MUSC 280J, TBA, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, Kang, Summer Session A
MUSC 280K: Applied Music:Voice Session: A, B Instructor: TBA
Individualized instruction in Voice. Performance opportunities; performance class, hearing before faculty, optional musicale and/or recital. May be repeated for to 8 credit hours. Students will have functional to advanced performance ability based on skills development, repertoire expansion and enhancement
Applied Music:Voice, MUSC 280K, TBA, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, TBA, Summer Session A, B
MUSC 280L: Applied Music:Violin Session: A, B Instructor: TBA
Twelve 30-minute individual lessons in violin. Performance opportunities including studio classes, Honors Recital, and an end-of-semester jury. May be repeated for up to 8 credit hours. Students will be able to performance ability based on technical and musical development.
Applied Music:Violin, MUSC 280L, TBA, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, TBA, Summer Session A, B
NEUR 101: Introduction to Neuroscience Session: A Instructor: Eric Gobel
This course will introduce students to basic concepts and the variety of topics in the field of neuroscience, including neuroanatomy (gross and cellular), physiology, neural basis of behavior, malfunctions due to disease and injury, and methods used to study these areas; laying a foundation for advanced coursework in neuroscience. Outcomes: Knowledge of the organization of the nervous system, cellular events that underlie emotions, learning, and behavior, and awareness of classical and modern methods for advancing the field.
Introduction to Neuroscience, NEUR 101, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Psychology, Eric Gobel, Summer Session A
NEUR 101: Introduction to Neuroscience Session: B Instructor: Stephan Steidl
This course will introduce students to basic concepts and the variety of topics in the field of neuroscience, including neuroanatomy (gross and cellular), physiology, neural basis of behavior, malfunctions due to disease and injury, and methods used to study these areas; laying a foundation for advanced coursework in neuroscience. Outcomes: Knowledge of the organization of the nervous system, cellular events that underlie emotions, learning, and behavior, and awareness of classical and modern methods for advancing the field.
Introduction to Neuroscience, NEUR 101, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Psychology, Stephan Steidl, Summer Session B
PHIL 130: Philosophy and Persons Session: A Instructor: Hoppe
The course examines the way philosophy looks for fundamental characteristics that identify life as a properly human life, asks about its ultimate meaning or purpose, and raises questions about what counts as a good life. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the various approaches of the philosophical question of what it means to be human.
Philosophy and Persons, PHIL 130, TBA, cas, Philosophy, Hoppe, Summer Session A
PHIL 130: Philosophy and Persons Session: A Instructor: Jacobs
The course examines the way philosophy looks for fundamental characteristics that identify life as a properly human life, asks about its ultimate meaning or purpose, and raises questions about what counts as a good life. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the various approaches of the philosophical question of what it means to be human.
Philosophy and Persons, PHIL 130, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Philosophy, Jacobs, Summer Session A
PHIL 130: Philosophy and Persons Session: B Instructor: Kim
The course examines the way philosophy looks for fundamental characteristics that identify life as a properly human life, asks about its ultimate meaning or purpose, and raises questions about what counts as a good life. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the various approaches of the philosophical question of what it means to be human.
Philosophy and Persons, PHIL 130, Tue, Thurs, cas, Philosophy, Kim, Summer Session B
PHIL 130: Philosophy and Persons Session: B Instructor: Samar
The course examines the way philosophy looks for fundamental characteristics that identify life as a properly human life, asks about its ultimate meaning or purpose, and raises questions about what counts as a good life. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the various approaches of the philosophical question of what it means to be human.
Philosophy and Persons, PHIL 130, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Philosophy, Samar, Summer Session B
PHIL 181: Ethics Session: A Instructor: Parks
This course examines ethical norms for conduct (e.g., theories of right and wrong action, of justice and of human rights) and ethical norms for judging the goodness or badness of persons and their lives. Special attention will be given to criteria for choosing between conflicting ethical theories, moral disagreement, the justification of moral judgments, and the application of ethical standards to practical decision-making and ethical questions that arise in everyday life. At the end of the course students are able to demonstrate understanding of criteria for choosing between conflicting ethical theories, moral disagreement, the justification of moral judgments, and the application of ethical standards to practical decision-making and ethical questions that arise in everyday life.
Ethics, PHIL 181, TBA, cas, Philosophy, Parks, Summer Session A
PHIL 181: Ethics Session: A Instructor: Parks
This course examines ethical norms for conduct (e.g., theories of right and wrong action, of justice and of human rights) and ethical norms for judging the goodness or badness of persons and their lives. Special attention will be given to criteria for choosing between conflicting ethical theories, moral disagreement, the justification of moral judgments, and the application of ethical standards to practical decision-making and ethical questions that arise in everyday life. At the end of the course students are able to demonstrate understanding of criteria for choosing between conflicting ethical theories, moral disagreement, the justification of moral judgments, and the application of ethical standards to practical decision-making and ethical questions that arise in everyday life.
Ethics, PHIL 181, TBA, cas, Philosophy, Parks, Summer Session A
PHIL 181: Ethics Session: B Instructor: Linn
This course examines ethical norms for conduct (e.g., theories of right and wrong action, of justice and of human rights) and ethical norms for judging the goodness or badness of persons and their lives. Special attention will be given to criteria for choosing between conflicting ethical theories, moral disagreement, the justification of moral judgments, and the application of ethical standards to practical decision-making and ethical questions that arise in everyday life. At the end of the course students are able to demonstrate understanding of criteria for choosing between conflicting ethical theories, moral disagreement, the justification of moral judgments, and the application of ethical standards to practical decision-making and ethical questions that arise in everyday life.
Ethics, PHIL 181, TBA, cas, Philosophy, Linn, Summer Session B
PHIL 182: Social & Political Philosophy Session: A Instructor: Stefano Giacchetti
This course will investigate one of the central questions of philosophy and social theory: how we, as human beings, should live together. Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the major philosophical questions in the area of social philosophy with attention to the historical and conceptual development of these questions, and be able to articulate some of the major problems and responses central to this area of philosophy.
Social & Political Philosophy, PHIL 182, TBA, scps, Stefano Giacchetti, Summer Session A
PHIL 274: Logic Session: A Instructor: VanderNat
This course is a detailed study of the deductive methods and principles of correct reasoning, from both the traditional and modern point of view. Students will be able to formally analyze, evaluate, and demonstrate the various aspects of argumentation.
Logic, PHIL 274, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Philosophy, VanderNat, Summer Session A
PHIL 279: Judgment and Decision-making Session: A Instructor: Linn
This course examines the philosophical and psychological foundations of decision-making. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the principles of reasoning and decision-making.
Judgment and Decision-making, PHIL 279, TBA, cas, Philosophy, Linn, Summer Session A
PHIL 284: Health Care Ethics Session: B Instructor: Lomelino
This course studies philosophical ethics as practiced in the health care setting. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of traditional moral theories in a health care framework, as well as the varieties of ethical challenges facing contemporary health care.
Health Care Ethics, PHIL 284, TBA, cas, Philosophy, Lomelino, Summer Session B
PHIL 287: Environmental Ethics Session: B Instructor: Derdak
This course introduces students to ethical reasoning and to various topics in environmental ethics. Topics may include: pollution, animal rights, and natural resources. Students will demonstrate an understanding of diverse ethical theories and an ability to use philosophical reasoning to defend positions in topics covered.
Environmental Ethics, PHIL 287, TBA, cas, Philosophy, Derdak, Summer Session B
PHIL 288: Culture and Civilization: Classical Chinese Philosophy Session: B Instructor: Kim
This course examines the nature, causes, and possible future development of human culture and civilization. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the various approaches to the philosophical study of human culture and civilization.
Culture and Civilization: Classical Chinese Philosophy, PHIL 288, TBA, cas, Philosophy, Kim, Summer Session B
PHIL 350: Directed Reading Session: A, B Instructor: Morgan-Olsen
Independent research according to program developed jointly by the student and a faculty director. Open to majors and to non-majors with the permission of the chairperson. Students will be able to understand and articulate philosophical problems and answers regarding the selected topic.
Directed Reading, PHIL 350, TBA, cas, Philosophy, Morgan-Olsen, Summer Session A, B
PHYS 111: College Physics I Session: A Instructor: McNees
Non-calculus introduction to vectors, kinematics, Newtonian mechanics of translational, rotational, and oscillatory motion, energy and momentum conservation, and thermodynamics. Students will gain an understanding of analytical description of motion and application of conservation laws; develop scientific insight and proficiency in solving representative problems.
College Physics I, PHYS 111, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Physics, McNees, Summer Session A
PHYS 111: College Physics I Session: A Instructor: Polak
Non-calculus introduction to vectors, kinematics, Newtonian mechanics of translational, rotational, and oscillatory motion, energy and momentum conservation, and thermodynamics. Students will gain an understanding of analytical description of motion and application of conservation laws; develop scientific insight and proficiency in solving representative problems.
College Physics I, PHYS 111, TBA, cas, Physics, Polak, Summer Session A
PHYS 111/111K: College Physics I & IK Session: A Instructor: Cannon
Calculus based introduction to vectors, kinematics, Newtonian mechanics of translational, rotational, and oscillatory motion, energy and momentum conservation, and thermodynamics. Outcome: Understanding of analytical description of motion and application of conservation laws; develop scientific insight and proficiency in solving representative problems.
College Physics I & IK, PHYS 111/111K, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Physics, Cannon, Summer Session A
PHYS 111L: College Physics Lab I Session: A Instructor: Ruubel
Laboratories cover selected topics in introductory mechanics, including freefall, uniform circular motion, work-energy, collisions, rotational motion, and harmonic motion. Students will gain experience and familiarity with basic measuring devices and simple mechanics equipment. Understand measurement errors and their propagation, plotting and interpretation of data, the connection between theory and experiment for selected topics in elementary mechanics.
College Physics Lab I, PHYS 111L, Mon, Wed, cas, Physics, Ruubel, Summer Session A
PHYS 111L: College Physics Lab I Session: A Instructor: Ruubel
Laboratories cover selected topics in introductory mechanics, including freefall, uniform circular motion, work-energy, collisions, rotational motion, and harmonic motion. Students will gain experience and familiarity with basic measuring devices and simple mechanics equipment. Understand measurement errors and their propagation, plotting and interpretation of data, the connection between theory and experiment for selected topics in elementary mechanics.
College Physics Lab I, PHYS 111L, Mon, Wed, cas, Physics, Ruubel, Summer Session A
PHYS 111L: College Physics Lab I Session: A Instructor: Cannon
Laboratories cover selected topics in introductory mechanics, including freefall, uniform circular motion, work-energy, collisions, rotational motion, and harmonic motion. Students will gain experience and familiarity with basic measuring devices and simple mechanics equipment. Understand measurement errors and their propagation, plotting and interpretation of data, the connection between theory and experiment for selected topics in elementary mechanics.
College Physics Lab I, PHYS 111L, Mon, Wed, cas, Physics, Cannon, Summer Session A
PHYS 111L: College Physics Lab I Session: A Instructor: Khamesian
Laboratories cover selected topics in introductory mechanics, including freefall, uniform circular motion, work-energy, collisions, rotational motion, and harmonic motion. Students will gain experience and familiarity with basic measuring devices and simple mechanics equipment. Understand measurement errors and their propagation, plotting and interpretation of data, the connection between theory and experiment for selected topics in elementary mechanics.
College Physics Lab I , PHYS 111L, Tue, Thurs, cas, Physics, Khamesian, Summer Session A
PHYS 111L: College Physics Lab I Session: A Instructor: Ruubel
Laboratories cover selected topics in introductory mechanics, including freefall, uniform circular motion, work-energy, collisions, rotational motion, and harmonic motion. Students will gain experience and familiarity with basic measuring devices and simple mechanics equipment. Understand measurement errors and their propagation, plotting and interpretation of data, the connection between theory and experiment for selected topics in elementary mechanics.
College Physics Lab I , PHYS 111L, Tue, Thurs, cas, Physics, Ruubel, Summer Session A
PHYS 112: College Physics II Session: B Instructor: Le
This course is a continuation of Physics 111. Lecture and discussion of electricity and magnetism, sound, optics and selected topics from modern physics.
College Physics II, PHYS 112, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Physics, Le, Summer Session B
PHYS 112: College Physics II Session: B Instructor: Klinger
This course is a continuation of Physics 111. Lecture and discussion of electricity and magnetism, sound, optics and selected topics from modern physics.
College Physics II , PHYS 112, TBA, cas, Physics, Klinger, Summer Session B
PHYS 112/112K : College Physics II/IIK Session: B Instructor: Abuzayyad
Calculus based introduction to vectors, kinematics, Newtonian mechanics of translational, rotational, and oscillatory motion, energy and momentum conservation, and thermodynamics. Outcome: Understanding of analytical description of motion and application of conservation laws; develop scientific insight and proficiency in solving representative problems.
College Physics II/IIK, PHYS 112/112K , Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Physics, Abuzayyad , Summer Session B
PHYS 112L: College Physics Lab II Session: B Instructor: Abuzayyad
One two-hour laboratory period per week, to complement Physics 112.
College Physics Lab II, PHYS 112L, Mon, Wed, cas, Physics, Abuzayyad, Summer Session B
PHYS 112L: College Physics Lab II Session: B Instructor: Klinger
One two-hour laboratory period per week, to complement Physics 112.
College Physics Lab II , PHYS 112L, Mon, Wed, cas, Physics, Klinger, Summer Session B
PHYS 112L: College Physics Lab II Session: B Instructor: Klinger
One two-hour laboratory period per week, to complement Physics 112.
College Physics Lab II , PHYS 112L, Mon, Wed, cas, Physics, Klinger, Summer Session B
PHYS 112L: College Physics Lab II Session: B Instructor: Klinger
College Physics Lab II , PHYS 112L, Tue, Thurs, cas, Physics, Klinger, Summer Session B
PHYS 112L : College Physics Lab II Session: B Instructor: Klinger
One two-hour laboratory period per week, to complement Physics 112.
College Physics Lab II, PHYS 112L , Tue, Thurs, cas, Physics, Klinger, Summer Session B
PLSC 101: American Politics Session: B Instructor: Bryan
American national government and politics, including institutions, group and electoral processes, and public policy. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the American political system, the patterns of political participation and behavior of diverse individuals and groups in American society, and evaluate the roles and processes of U.S. political institutions.
American Politics, PLSC 101, TBA, cas, Bryan, Summer Session B
PLSC 102: International Relations in an Age of Globalization Session: A, B Instructor: Grigorescu
Competing perspectives on international politics and global issues such as North-South relations, human rights, war and peace, population growth, and environmentalism. Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the main approaches to the study of international politics and to analyze and assess such major substantive issues as interstate war, terrorism, arms control, international political economy and sustainable development.
International Relations in an Age of Globalization, PLSC 102, TBA, cas, Grigorescu, Summer Session A, B
PLSC 300A: Inequality and American Democracy Session: B Instructor: Condon
Investigation of selected topics or methods in American Politics. This course may be repeated depending on subject matter.
Inequality and American Democracy, PLSC 300A, TBA, cas, Condon, Summer Session B
PLSC 354: Global Environmental Politics Session: B Instructor: Sensi
Examines the linkages between the world's natural environment and the global political system. Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the role of various private, national and international actors in the formulation, adoption and implementation of environmental public policies. Can also count for ESP 354, INTS 354 or PAX 354
Global Environmental Politics, PLSC 354, Tue, Thurs, cas, Sensi, Summer Session B
PLSC 358: War, Peace, and Politics Session: A Instructor: Melin
The historical evolution of war, the nature of wars in the 20th century and into the 21st century, the nature of threats, sources of conflict, and procedures for peaceful resolution of disputes. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principal causes of wars, the means and ends of warfare, and the process and prospects of reestablishing peace.
War, Peace, and Politics, PLSC 358, TBA, cas, Melin, Summer Session A
PLSC 370: Fieldwork in Political Science Instructor: TBA
Practical experience in political and governmental agencies and organizations in Chicago and Washington, D.C. Students learn about different forms of public service and the ethical responsibilities of civic engagement. Working in a professional office for fifteen weeks allows students to experience the world of public service first-hand. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of models of leadership and public service by working with supervisors who are typically leaders in their fields.
Fieldwork in Political Science, PLSC 370, TBA, cas, TBA,
PLSC 396: Directed Readings Session: A, B Instructor: TBA
Please see the department for details.
Directed Readings, PLSC 396, TBA, cas, TBA, Summer Session A, B
PLST 331: Intro to Paralegal Studies Session: C Instructor: Katrice Miller
Required of all students in their first session of study. An introduction to the function and sources of American law (including the U.S. Constitution), the American legal system, the civil litigation process, and legal practice, focusing on the role of the paralegal. Trends in the paralegal field, including regulation and career issues. Outcomes: Students will recognize typical paralegal responsibilities in various areas of legal practice and be aware of recent developments in the field, especially regulatory proposals affecting paralegals.
Intro to Paralegal Studies, PLST 331, Mon, scps, Katrice Miller, Summer Session C
PLST 332: Legal Research and Writing I Session: C Instructor: Nicholas Kourvetaris
An introduction to the fundamentals of legal research, focusing on locating, analyzing and updating case law (court opinions). Practice in researching case law in hard copy and online, and in writing case briefs. Outcomes: Students will be able to use various reference books and online services (LEXIS and WESTLAW) to locate, analyze, and update case law, and will be able to write case briefs.
Legal Research and Writing I, PLST 332, Tue, scps, Nicholas Kourvetaris, Summer Session C
PLST 335: Legal Ethics Session: C Instructor: Joan Stevens
Ethical considerations in the practice of law that paralegals are likely to encounter, especially the unauthorized practice of law, client confidentiality and conflicts of interest. Review of ethical codes for attorneys and paralegals.
Legal Ethics, PLST 335, Mon, scps, Joan Stevens, Summer Session C
PLST 342: Litigation Technology & eDiscovery Session: C Instructor: Felisha Clay
Hands-on instruction in software programs (Relativity) commonly used for litigation support, including electronic court filing, eDiscovery, case management, document control and trial presentation. Outcomes: Students will be able to assist attorneys in preparing for and conducting trials.
Litigation Technology & eDiscovery, PLST 342, Thurs, scps, Felisha Clay, Summer Session C
PLST 345: Law Office Computer Applications Session: C Instructor: Sarah Van Pelt
Hands-on instruction in software programs commonly used in law offices: word processing (templates, redlining, tables), spreadsheets (financial data, charts and graphs), pdf management (creating and combining pdfs, creating a portfolio, redacting, adding security) and presentation graphics. Outcomes: Students will be proficient in the fundamentals of word processing (templates, redlining, tables), spreadsheets (financial data, charts and graphs), database management (organizing, sorting, and retrieving information), and presentation graphics.
Law Office Computer Applications, PLST 345, Wed, scps, Sarah Van Pelt, Summer Session C
PLST 349: Torts Session: C Instructor: Nicholas Kourvetaris
An introduction to civil tort liability, including the intentional torts, negligence, strict liability, and product liability. Role of the paralegal in personal injury litigation. Practice in client interviewing techniques. Basic factual investigation techniques. Outcomes: Students will be familiar with the paralegal's role in personal injury litigation from both the plaintiff's and defendant's viewpoints, including typical pleadings and other documents.
Torts, PLST 349, Sat, scps, Nicholas Kourvetaris, Summer Session C
PLST 352: Intellectual Property: Trademarks and Copyrights Session: C Instructor: Edward Lance
An introduction to the terminology, basic principles and documentation requirements of trademark and copyright protection. Registration procedures and infringement disputes. Outcomes: Students will be familiar with registration procedures (including preparation of basic forms and documents) and infringement disputes.
Intellectual Property: Trademarks and Copyrights, PLST 352, Wed, scps, Edward Lance, Summer Session C
PLST 398: Internship Session: C Instructor: Marie Harrigan
Consent of Director and completion of 14-16 semester hours of study. Limited to student's last or second-last term of study. Practical experience (120 hours on site) for advanced students in applying paralegal skills within selected law firms, corporate law departments and governmental agencies. One mandatory class meeting, online journal, online discussions, and final paper. All internships are unpaid; only one internship may be completed for credit toward certificate.
Internship, PLST 398, scps, Marie Harrigan, Summer Session C
PSYC 101: General Psychology Session: A Instructor: Leach
Basic concepts and methods of psychology. Primary emphasis on the scientific study of consciousness and human behavior. Topics include: human development, personality, learning, thinking, perception, testing, mental illness and mental health, and biological and social aspects of behavior.
General Psychology, PSYC 101, Tue, Thurs, cas, Psychology, Leach, Summer Session A
PSYC 101 - section 002: GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY Session: B Instructor: Leach
Basic concepts and methods of psychology. Primary emphasis on the scientific study of consciousness and human behavior. Topics include: human development, personality, learning, thinking, perception, testing, mental illness and mental health, and biological and social aspects of behavior.
GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY, PSYC 101 - section 002, TBA, cas, Leach, Summer Session B
PSYC 238: Gender & Sex Differences & Similarities Session: A Instructor: Huntsinger
This course is an overview of psychological research and theory concerning differences and similarities between genders. Students will understand similarities and differences between genders, comprehend the diversity of ideas about gender and how ideas of gender are determined by societies and cultures.
Gender & Sex Differences & Similarities, PSYC 238, TBA, cas, Psychology, Huntsinger, Summer Session A
PSYC 250: Cognitive Psychology Session: B Instructor: Neal
Overview of cognitive psychology. Topics include: human information processing, object recognition, memory, attention, language production and comprehension, reasoning and problem solving. Students will understand and be able to explain how knowledge about mental events is obtained using a variety of experimental methods, discuss current empirical research and theories of cognition, understand well established cognitive theories about attention, memory, language processing, reasoning and decision-making
Cognitive Psychology, PSYC 250, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Psychology, Neal, Summer Session B
PSYC 275: Social Psychology Session: B Instructor: DeHart
Analysis of human thoughts, feelings and actions as influenced by other people. Topics include socialization, perception of self and others, prosocial and antisocial behavior, attitudes, interpersonal attraction, social influence and group behavior. Group B.
Social Psychology, PSYC 275, TBA, cas, Psychology, DeHart, Summer Session B
PSYC 275: Social Psychology Session: A Instructor: Mallett
Analysis of human thoughts, feelings and actions as influenced by other people. Topics include socialization, perception of self and others, prosocial and antisocial behavior, attitudes, interpersonal attraction, social influence and group behavior. Group B.
Social Psychology, PSYC 275, TBA, cas, Psychology, Mallett, Summer Session A
PSYC 304: Statistics Session: A Instructor: Stiedl
Fundamentals of statistical analysis in psychology and related fields. Topics include frequency distributions, central tendency, variability, graphical presentation, normal distribution correlation, sampling distributions and tests of statistical significance including analysis of variance.
Statistics, PSYC 304, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Psychology, Stiedl, Summer Session A
PSYC 304: Statistics Session: B Instructor: Behmer
Fundamentals of statistical analysis in psychology and related fields. Topics include frequency distributions, central tendency, variability, graphical presentation, normal distribution correlation, sampling distributions and tests of statistical significance including analysis of variance. This course is an introduction to fundamentals of statistical analysis in psychology.. Outcome: Students will demonstrate the ability to analyze data, interpret the results of research using basic statistical methods, and understand the conceptual foundation, appropriate use, and limitations of these statistical methods.
Statistics, PSYC 304, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Psychology, Behmer, Summer Session B
PSYC 304: Statistics Session: A Instructor: Devon Price
This course is an introduction to fundamentals of statistical analysis in psychology.. Outcome: Students will demonstrate the ability to analyze data, interpret the results of research using basic statistical methods, and understand the conceptual foundation, appropriate use, and limitations of these statistical methods.
Statistics, PSYC 304, TBA, scps, Devon Price, Summer Session A
PSYC 306: Research Methods Session: A Instructor: Winget
Logic and theory of the scientific method. Basic statistics and principles of research methodologies employed in approaching major problem areas in psychology. Written descriptions of research findings. This is a writing intensive course.
Research Methods, PSYC 306, Mon, Wed, cas, Psychology, Winget, Summer Session A
PSYC 306: Research Methods Session: B Instructor: Yoon
Logic and theory of the scientific method. Basic statistics and principles of research methodologies employed in approaching major problem areas in psychology. Written descriptions of research findings. This is a writing intensive course.
Research Methods, PSYC 306, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Psychology, Yoon, Summer Session B
PSYC 318: Lab in Developmental Session: A Instructor: Nesi
Lecture and laboratory on empirical studies of developmental processes in humans. Focus is on research in particular content areas within developmental stages (e.g., infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood) and research on changes in behavior across time.
Lab in Developmental, PSYC 318, Mon, Wed, cas, Psychology, Nesi, Summer Session A
PSYC 321: Lab in Social Session: B Instructor: Yustisia
Lectures, demonstrations, readings, and individual or group research projects illustrating various methods, such as observation, interviewing, archives, standardized tests, and experimentation, are used to learn about topics such as group influences on the individual, attitudes, prosocial and antisocial behavior, and perception of self and others. Students will demonstrate skills and knowledge of methodology in social psychological research; designing, conducting, analyzing and interpreting the results of a research project, and writing a research paper in APA format.
Lab in Social, PSYC 321, Mon, Wed, cas, Psychology, Yustisia, Summer Session B
PSYC 327: Lab in Body Image Session: A Instructor: Kellogg
This course will focus on the scholarly study of body image and eating disorders, as well as how research is conducted in the field. Students will complete smaller labs and a larger research project in the field. Lab on Body Image can be used by Psychology students to fulfill the B lab requirement.
Lab in Body Image, PSYC 327, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Psychology, Kellogg, Summer Session A
PSYC 331: Abnormal Psychology Session: A Instructor: Sandberg
Nature and causes of maladjustment and mental disorders. History of mental illness, diagnosis, research, and treatment of mental disorders. Students will demonstrate understanding of current approaches to researching maladaptive behavior, current views of maladaptive behavior, major categories of mental disorders, factors contributing to development of problems, different types of intervention strategies, and appreciation of social, ethical, and legal issues.
Abnormal Psychology, PSYC 331, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Psychology, Sandberg, Summer Session A
PSYC 368: Counseling Session: A Instructor: Davis
Introduction to the principles, theories, ethics, and techniques of major helping interventions including the clinical interview and use of the case history, individual and group approaches. Outcomes: Students will demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate different approaches to intervention in terms of their theoretical underpinnings, application to diverse problems, goals and populations, general effectiveness, and overall strengths and limitations.
Counseling, PSYC 368, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Psychology, Davis, Summer Session A
PSYC 397: Independent Research Session: A, B Instructor: Various
See department for details.
Independent Research, PSYC 397, TBA, cas, Psychology, Various, Summer Session A, B
PSYC 399: Special Studies in Psychology Session: A, B Instructor: Various
See department for details.
Special Studies in Psychology, PSYC 399, TBA, cas, Psychology, Various, Summer Session A, B
SCMG 332: Operations Management Session: C Instructor: TBA
An introduction to the topic of management of operations in manufacturing and services, which is about how firms efficiently produce goods and services. Topics include demand forecasting, aggregate and capacity planning, inventory management, layout, just-in-time (JIT), and managing quality. Additional topics may include location, project planning, resource allocation and logistics.
Operations Management, SCMG 332, TBA, quinlan, Information Systems and Supply Chain Management, TBA, Summer Session C
SOCL 101: Society in a Global Age Session: A Instructor: Everritt
This is a foundational course in the social sciences which explores the effect of globalization on everyday life in the United States and elsewhere, using the basic perspectives and methodologies of sociology.
Society in a Global Age, SOCL 101, Mon, Tue, Wed, cas, Sociology, Everritt, Summer Session A
SOCL 101 - section 002: SOCIETY IN A GLOBAL AGE Session: B Instructor: Kinsella
This is a foundational course in the social sciences which explores the effect of globalization on everyday life in the United States and elsewhere, using the basic perspectives and methodologies of sociology.
SOCIETY IN A GLOBAL AGE, SOCL 101 - section 002, Wed, cas, Kinsella, Summer Session B
SOCL 101 - section 003: SOCIETY IN A GLOBAL AGE Session: B Instructor: Zohara
This is a foundational course in the social sciences which explores the effect of globalization on everyday life in the United States and elsewhere, using the basic perspectives and methodologies of sociology.
SOCIETY IN A GLOBAL AGE, SOCL 101 - section 003, Tue, cas, Zohara, Summer Session B
SOCL 123: Mass Media & Popular Culture Session: A Instructor: Tuttle
This course examines the connections between the media of mass communication and multiple forms of popular art and culture. Topics considered include the social, political and cultural organization of mass communication and its impact on values, expectations, and life styles of contemporary society. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the social relationships between mass media and the general population.
Mass Media & Popular Culture, SOCL 123, Tue, Thurs, cas, Sociology, Tuttle, Summer Session A
SOCL 125: Chicago - Growth of a Metropolis Session: B Instructor: TBA
This course explores the development of Chicago metropolitan region from the 1830's to the present day. Students will explore the urban area not only through texts, but also through fieldwork. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the geography, history, and people of the Chicago metropolitan region.
Chicago - Growth of a Metropolis, SOCL 125, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Sociology, TBA, Summer Session B
SOCL 380: Internship Session: C Instructor: TBA
Supervised field experience for students working in a selected community organization, government agency, social agency, or business.
Internship, SOCL 380, TBA, cas, Sociology, TBA, Summer Session C
SOCL 398: Independent Study Session: C Instructor: TBA
Independent research done in collaboration with a faculty member on a sociological topic defined by the student in consultation with a faculty member. Student gains experience and expertise conducting independent research.
Independent Study, SOCL 398, TBA, cas, Sociology, TBA, Summer Session C
SPAN 101: Spanish I Session: A Instructor: Carillo
This course is an introduction to the basic elements of Spanish language and culture. It is designed for students with no previous experience in Spanish. Students will be able to understand simple messages and short narratives, respond to basic inquiries about themselves and others, formulate basic questions, as well as understand basic written texts.
Spanish I, SPAN 101, TBA, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Carillo, Summer Session A
SPAN 101: Spanish I Session: A Instructor: Kust
This course is an introduction to the basic elements of Spanish language and culture. It is designed for students with no previous experience in Spanish. Students will be able to understand simple messages and short narratives, respond to basic inquiries about themselves and others, formulate basic questions, as well as understand basic written texts.
Spanish I, SPAN 101, TBA, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Kust, Summer Session A
SPAN 102: Spanish II Session: A Instructor: Knight
This course builds on 101, and introduces students to new topics and grammatical structures. Students will be able to produce sounds in Spanish more accurately, express appropriate reactions to ordinary situations, understand basic oral commands, read more complex texts, and write sentences in cohesive paragraphs.
Spanish II, SPAN 102, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Knight, Summer Session A
SPAN 102: Spanish II Session: B Instructor: Carillo
This course builds on 101, and introduces students to new topics and grammatical structures. Students will be able to produce sounds in Spanish more accurately, express appropriate reactions to ordinary situations, understand basic oral commands, read more complex texts, and write sentences in cohesive paragraphs.
Spanish II, SPAN 102, Tue, Fri, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Carillo, Summer Session B
SPAN 102: Spanish II Session: B Instructor: Maldonado
This course builds on 101, and introduces students to new topics and grammatical structures. Students will be able to produce sounds in Spanish more accurately, express appropriate reactions to ordinary situations, understand basic oral commands, read more complex texts, and write sentences in cohesive paragraphs.
Spanish II, SPAN 102, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Maldonado, Summer Session B
SPAN 365: Intro to Latin American Cinema Session: A Instructor: Rodriguez Navas
This course will focus on Latin American cinema, from its early beginnings in silent cinema to the present. Instructor's consent required to enroll. Students will gain an understanding of the formation of national film industries, the emergence of larger regional trends, and the cinematic treatment of social, political and economic aspects of various Latin American countries.
Intro to Latin American Cinema, SPAN 365, TBA, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Rodriguez Navas, Summer Session A
STAT 103: Fundamental Statistics Session: C Instructor: Judith Moran
This course provides an introduction to statistical reasoning and techniques in descriptive and inferential statistics and their applications in economics, education, genetics, medicine, physics, political science, and psychology. Not open to students who have completed ISOM 241. Outcome: Students will obtain a background in the fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistics along with an understanding of their uses and misuses. This course satisfies the quantitative literacy requirement of the core curriculum.
Fundamental Statistics, STAT 103, Sat, scps, Judith Moran, Summer Session C
STAT 103: Fundamentals of Statistics Session: A Instructor: Gregory Matthews
This course provides an introduction to statistical reasoning and techniques in descriptive and inferential statistics and their applications in economics, education, genetics, medicine, physics, political science, and psychology. Not open to students who have completed ISOM 241. Outcome: Students will obtain a background in the fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistics along with an understanding of their uses and misuses. This course satisfies the quantitative literacy requirement of the core curriculum.
Fundamentals of Statistics, STAT 103, Tue, Thurs, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Gregory Matthews, Summer Session A
STAT 335: Introduction to Biostatistics Session: A Instructor: Longman
This course provides an introduction to the statistical methods used in designing biological experiments and in data analysis, including computer laboratory assignments with biological data. Students interested in research in the life sciences will obtain a background in the appropriate use of statistical methods as an experimental tool.
Introduction to Biostatistics, STAT 335, Tue, Thurs, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, Longman, Summer Session A
STAT 398: Independent Study in Statistics Session: A, B Instructor: TBA
This course allows students to engage in independent study on selected topics in statistics under the supervision of a faculty member. Students will obtain an understanding of an advanced topic in their major.
Independent Study in Statistics, STAT 398, TBA, cas, Mathematics & Statistics, TBA, Summer Session A, B
THEO 100: Introduction to Christian Theology Session: A Instructor: Calpino
This course is an introduction to reflection on and analysis of the Christian theological tradition. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the tasks of Christian theology in its efforts to understand the human situation from the perspective of faith, various challenges to theology in the contemporary world, and will focus on one or more current theological issues.
Introduction to Christian Theology , THEO 100, TBA, cas, Theology, Calpino, Summer Session A
THEO 100: Introduction to Christian Theology Session: B Instructor: Wang
This course is an introduction to reflection on and analysis of the Christian theological tradition. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the tasks of Christian theology in its efforts to understand the human situation from the perspective of faith, various challenges to theology in the contemporary world, and will focus on one or more current theological issues.
Introduction to Christian Theology , THEO 100, TBA, cas, Theology, Wang, Summer Session B
THEO 107: Introduction to Religious Studies Session: A Instructor: Dickinson
This course is an introduction to the contemporary field of religious studies, focusing on both the theoretical investigations of religious traditions, as well as on the study of selected religious texts and practices (such as creation stories, sacred biographies, sacred scriptures of a religious tradition(s) rituals, ritual taboos, religiously motivated behaviors. Students will be able to analyze and interpret various ways in which religious traditions intersect with contemporary issues.
Introduction to Religious Studies, THEO 107, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Theology , Dickinson, Summer Session A
THEO 107: Introduction to Religious Studies Session: B Instructor: Andrejevs
This course is an introduction to the contemporary field of religious studies, focusing on both the theoretical investigations of religious traditions, as well as on the study of selected religious texts and practices (such as creation stories, sacred biographies, sacred scriptures of a religious tradition(s) rituals, ritual taboos, religiously motivated behaviors. Students will be able to analyze and interpret various ways in which religious traditions intersect with contemporary issues.
Introduction to Religious Studies, THEO 107, TBA, cas, Theology , Andrejevs , Summer Session B
THEO 186: Introduction to Religious Ethics Session: A Instructor: French
Religious Ethics explores fundamental moral sources and methods in Christian ethics in dialogue with the ethical understandings of at least one other religious tradition, and with special attention to Roman Catholic thought. In doing so, it explores moral issues faced by individuals and communities from theological perspectives, particularly mindful of how the economic, political and cultural structures in a religiously plural world affect those issues. In this course, students will explore and compare the ethical understandings of Christianity and at least one other religious tradition. With respect to each tradition, students will learn about the foundational sources, doctrines, and questions that guide their ethical thinking.
Introduction to Religious Ethics , THEO 186, cas, Theology, French, Summer Session A
THEO 190: Loyola's Mission: Theology Session: A Instructor: Timothy Sever
The course introduces students to LUC's mission through theological reflection on the main themes of the Transformative Education mission-statement: spirituality and faith, interlinked human knowing, moral compass, civic and environmental responsibility. Outcome: Integration into the LUC community, ethos, and vision.
Loyola's Mission: Theology, THEO 190, TBA, scps, Timothy Sever, Summer Session A
THEO 232: New Testament Session: A Instructor: Skinner
This course is an introduction to the historical and theological reading of the various documents of early Christianity known as the New Testament. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the literary genres found in the New Testament and explain why the recognition of genre is essential to the interpretation of the New Testament, as well as the importance of how the New Testament documents have reached their present state.
New Testament , THEO 232, Mon, Wed, cas, Theology, Skinner, Summer Session A
THEO 266: Church & Global Studies Session: B Instructor: Luca Badetti JFRC
This course provides an introduction to ways in which the Christian churches, and primarily the Roman Catholic Church, understand and enact their identity in relation to the secular world of culture, economics, and politics, both nationally and globally. This is a theology course, therefore diverse theological questions from students are welcomed and encouraged! To facilitate class participation, the class will not only consist of lectures but also of student involvement, which include small group discussions and presentations. Outcome: Students will be able to analyze and interpret contrasting Christian understandings of the notion of original sin, and demonstrate knowledge, with attention to historical development, of the central texts, beliefs, ethical understandings, and practices of at least one religious tradition.
Church & Global Studies , THEO 266, TBA, Theology , Luca Badetti , Summer Session B ,JFRC
THEO 267: Jesus Christ Session: B Instructor: Svebakken
This course examines the life of Jesus Christ, utilizing the Gospels, the writings of Paul and other biblical authors, the early ecumenical councils, and the history of church doctrine, including contemporary scholarship.
Jesus Christ, THEO 267, Mon, Wed, cas, Theology, Svebakken, Summer Session B
THEO 278: Women and Religion Session: B Instructor: Schoenfeld
This course will briefly introduce students to the history of feminist theological and ethical thought and it will also explore contemporary, pressing issues in theology and ethics by listening to distinct and sometimes contrasting, feminist/womanist/etc. voices.
Women and Religion, THEO 278, TBA, cas, Theology, Schoenfeld, Summer Session B
THEO 279: Roman Catholicism Session: B Instructor: Rudolf Kutschera JFRC
This course wants to enable students to demonstrate understanding of the most important Roman Catholic beliefs, the historical evolution of Roman Catholicism, its key concepts, terms, values, and religious practices. The majority of sessions will take place onsite in order to combine firsthand experience in Rome with reflection and discussion. Reflection papers will contribute to form a holistic picture out of the various impressions and pieces of information.
Roman Catholicism , THEO 279, TBA, Rudolf Kutschera , Summer Session B ,JFRC
THEO 282: Introduction to Hinduism Session: A Instructor: Pintchman
This course provides an introduction to Hinduism. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the most important Hindu scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Hinduism, the key Hindu concepts, terms, values, and religious practices, and the basic narratives and imagery of Hinduism.
Introduction to Hinduism, THEO 282, TBA, cas, Theology, Pintchman, Summer Session A
THEO 293: Christian Marriage Session: B Instructor: Murphy
This course examines the Christian understanding of marriage. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of historical & ethical principles used to evaluate particular issues relevant to the understanding of the Christian tradition of marriage.
Christian Marriage , THEO 293, TBA, cas, Theology, Murphy, Summer Session B
THTR 100: Intro to Theatre Session: A Instructor: Mark Lococo
This course is an introductory study of the theatrical art form and its contemporary production practice. Students engage in a series of workshops and participatory creative projects. Outcome: Students will demonstrate the ability to identify the variety of collaborating arts and artists that combine to create a work of theatre; to analyze a play script for live performance; to evaluate theatrical production, and to creatively apply knowledge of the theatrical process through expressive and creative endeavors.
Intro to Theatre, THTR 100, TBA, cas, Theatre, Mark Lococo, Summer Session A
THTR 100: Intro to the Theatrical Experience Session: A Instructor: Lococo
This course is an introductory study of the theatrical art form and its contemporary production practice. Students will demonstrate the ability to identify the variety of collaborating arts and artists that combine to create of a work of theatre; to analyze a play script for live performance; to evaluate theatrical production; and to creatively apply knowledge of theatrical process through expressive and creative endeavors. This course will be conducted online, and will include weekly synchronous meetings.
Intro to the Theatrical Experience, THTR 100, TBA, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, Lococo, Summer Session A
THTR 100: Intro to the Theatrical Experience Session: B Instructor: Mann
This course is an introductory study of the theatrical art form and its contemporary production practice. Students will demonstrate the ability to identify the variety of collaborating arts and artists that combine to create of a work of theatre; to analyze a play script for live performance; to evaluate theatrical production; and to creatively apply knowledge of theatrical process through expressive and creative endeavors. This course will be conducted online, and will include weekly synchronous meetings.
Intro to the Theatrical Experience, THTR 100, TBA, cas, Fine & Performing Arts, Mann, Summer Session B
THTR 100: Introduction to Theatre Session: B Instructor: Timothy Mann
This course is an introductory study of the theatrical art form and its contemporary production practice. Students engage in a series of workshops and participatory creative projects. Outcome: Students will demonstrate the ability to identify the variety of collaborating arts and artists that combine to create a work of theatre; to analyze a play script for live performance; to evaluate theatrical production, and to creatively apply knowledge of the theatrical process through expressive and creative endeavors.
Introduction to Theatre , THTR 100, TBA, cas, Theatre, Timothy Mann, Summer Session B
THTR 394: Internship in Theatre Session: B Instructor: Staff
Theatre students complete a semester-long internship providing an opportunity to use their technical, research or organization skills in a professional setting. Students must complete and reflect upon 50 hours of internship experience per credit hour that is pre-approved by the Department of Fine and Performing Arts. Department Permission Required. No more than 6 credit hours of Internship of Fieldwork may e applied to the major. Outcome: Students gain professional experience working at a theatrical organization while reflecting on their work experience and applying theories and techniques acquired from their theatre courses.
Internship in Theatre, THTR 394, TBA, cas, Theatre, Staff, Summer Session B
THTR 297: Fieldwork in Chicago - Theatre Session: A Instructor: Mark Lococo
Variable credit (1-6 hours) given for performances or projects undertaken with professional theatre organizations outside the university. Students keep a journal and write evaluative papers. Permission of the Department of Fine and Performing Arts Required. Repeatable for up to 6 credit hours, however no more than 6 credit hours of Internship or Fieldwork can be applied towards the major. Outcome: Specific outcomes and credit hours assigned to be determined by the student in consultation with the Director of Theatre and the project supervisor.
Fieldwork in Chicago - Theatre , THTR 297, TBA, cas, Theatre, Mark Lococo, Summer Session A
THTR 397: Fieldwork in Chicago - Theatre Session: B Instructor: Staff
Variable credit (1-6 hours) given for performances or projects undertaken with professional theatre organizations outside the university. Students keep a journal and write evaluative papers. Permission of the Department of Fine and Performing Arts Required. Repeatable for up to 6 credit hours, however no more than 6 credit hours of Internship or Fieldwork can be applied towards the major. Outcome: Specific outcomes and credit hours assigned to be determined by the student in consultation with the Director of Theatre and the project supervisor. This class satisfies the Engaged Learning requirement in the Fieldwork category.
Fieldwork in Chicago - Theatre , THTR 397, TBA, cas, Theatre , Staff, Summer Session B
THTR 399: Independent Study Session: A Instructor: Mark Lococo
Independent study projects may be of various kinds and in any recognized area of the theatre arts. Such projects should be done under the close supervision of a theatre faculty member. Outcome: To be determined by the student in consultation with the chairperson and theatre faculty supervisor.
Independent Study , THTR 399, TBA, cas, Theatre, Mark Lococo, Summer Session A
THTR 399: Independent Study Session: B Instructor: Staff
Independent study projects may be of various kinds and in any recognized area of the theatre arts. Such projects should be done under the close supervision of a theatre faculty member. Outcome: To be determined by the student in consultation with the chairperson and theatre faculty supervisor.
Independent Study, THTR 399, TBA, cas, Theatre, Staff, Summer Session B
UCLR 100: Interpreting Literature Session: C Instructor: Amanda Marbais
This class will be a prerequisite for all second tier literature courses, as designated by each department. The foundational course of literary studies will require students to read closely and analyze carefully a representative variety of prose, poetry, and drama, master key literary and critical term, and explore a variety of core critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature.
Interpreting Literature , UCLR 100, TBA, scps, Amanda Marbais, Summer Session C
UCLR 100C: Interpreting Literature Session: A Instructor: Edith Livermore
The foundational course of literary studies requires students to read closely and analyze carefully a representative variety of prose, poetry, and drama, master key literary and critical terms, and explore a variety of core critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature. Sections taught by faculty in the Department of Classical Studies focus on the literature of the Greek and Roman worlds in English translation. Readings will include selections from Homer’s Odyssey, Greek tragedy, speeches of Cicero, and the letters of Pliny the Younger.
Interpreting Literature, UCLR 100C, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Classical Studies, Edith Livermore, Summer Session A
UCLR 100M: Univ CORE Literary Foundations Interpreting Literature Session: B Instructor: Hong Chen
This is a foundational course that introduces key literary and critical terms and explores a variety of critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature. In particular, we will be looking at the concepts of dying, death and grieving and discuss how these concepts are depicted in a number of different poems, plays and short stories. These topics are often difficult topics to discuss and yet, they are inevitable realities in each of our lives. Thus, we will use texts, by a number of different American authors, such as Margaret Edson, Raymond Carver, Mary Oliver, Adrienne Rich and more, to explore what dying, death and grieving might consist of, not only personally but also politically, and further, within the medical field itself. The method of assessment will include quizzes, three, four-page papers, and classroom participation.
Univ CORE Literary Foundations Interpreting Literature, UCLR 100M, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, Modern Languages & Literatures, Hong Chen, Summer Session B
UCSF 137: Scientific Basis of Environmental Issues Session: B Instructor: Greg Palmer
The foundational course in science is predicated on the view that understanding environmental issues and their underlying scientific principles will occupy a central role in our students' lives and will be critical in their development as informed and participating members of society. The overarching strategy of the course will be to frame environmental science in terms of a series of interacting systems to allow students to analyze a variety of environmental issues. Outcomes: 1) Exhibit knowledge of the nature of the four Earth systems 2) Draw inferences from evidence, constructing testable and falsifiable hypotheses and analyzing data.3) Understand the role of energy and thermodynamics in ecosystems; 4) Understand and describe important cycles in nature
Scientific Basis of Environmental Issues, UCSF 137, Mon, Tue, Wed, ies, Greg Palmer, Summer Session B
UCSF 137: The Scientific Basis of Environmental Issues Session: A Instructor: Gregory Palmer
Understanding environmental issues and their underlying scientific principles will occupy a central role in students' lives and will be critical in development as informed and participating members of society. The overarching strategy of the course will be to frame environmental science in terms of a series of interacting systems to allow students to analyze a variety of environmental issues. Outcomes: Exhibit knowledge of the nature of the four Earth systems 2) Draw inferences from the evidence, constructing testable and falsifiable hypotheses and analyzing data.3) Understand the role of energy and thermodynamics in ecosystems; 4) Understand and describe important cycles in nature
The Scientific Basis of Environmental Issues , UCSF 137, Mon, Tue, Wed, ies, Tier 1 Science Core , Gregory Palmer, Summer Session A
UCSF 137: The Scientific Basis of Environmental Issues Session: B Instructor: Sasha Adkins
Understanding environmental issues and their underlying scientific principles will occupy a central role in students' lives and will be critical in development as informed and participating members of society. The overarching strategy of the course will be to frame environmental science in terms of a series of interacting systems to allow students to analyze a variety of environmental issues. Outcomes: Exhibit knowledge of the nature of the four Earth systems 2) Draw inferences from the evidence, constructing testable and falsifiable hypotheses and analyzing data.3) Understand the role of energy and thermodynamics in ecosystems; 4) Understand and describe important cycles in nature
The Scientific Basis of Environmental Issues, UCSF 137, Mon, Tue, Wed, ies, Tier 1 Science Core , Sasha Adkins, Summer Session B
UCWR 110: Writing Responsibly Session: C Instructor: Michael Rydel
Writing Responsibly instructs students in the conventions of academic writing. Students will develop flexible strategies for generating, revising, editing their writing and will receive instruction in how to write clear, error free prose. Students will learn responsibility to their readers, responsibility to their sources, and responsibility to themselves as writers.
Writing Responsibly, UCWR 110, TBA, scps, Michael Rydel, Summer Session C
UCWR 110: Writing Responsibly Session: A Instructor: Elissa Stogner
Writing Responsibly instructs students in the conventions of academic writing. Students will develop flexible strategies for generating, revising, editing their writing and will receive instruction in how to write clear, error free prose. Students will learn responsibility to their readers, responsibility to their sources, and responsibility to themselves as writers.
Writing Responsibly, UCWR 110, Tue, Wed, Thurs, cas, English, Elissa Stogner, Summer Session A
WSGS 388: Women's Studies Practicum Session: B Instructor: TBA
This supervised field experience uses experiential learning at a wide variety of uses experiential learning at a variety of women’s political, cultural or educational organizations as the basis for learning and refining skills, which cab benefit gender equity. Students demonstrate skill proficiency, professional conduct, and systematic reflection on their experience. Students learn about public and private sector responses to women's issues and concerns.
Women's Studies Practicum , WSGS 388, TBA, cas, Women's Studies Gender Studies , TBA, Summer Session B
BIOL 335: Intro to Biostatistics Session: A Instructor: Bret Longman
An introduction to statistical methods used in designing biological experiments and in data analyses. Topics include probability and sampling distribution, designed biological experiments and analysis of variance, regression and correlation, stochastic processes, and frequency distributions. Computer laboratory assignments with biological data.
Intro to Biostatistics , BIOL 335, biology , Bret Longman , Summer Session A
BIOL 366: Cell Physiol & Biochem Session: A Instructor: Polina Pine
An introduction to biochemical principles as they relate to major biological themes such as the relationship between cellular structure and function, metabolism, thermodynamics, regulation, information pathways, and evolution. BIOL 366 is cross-listed with CHEM 361.
Cell Physiol & Biochem , BIOL 366, Polina Pine, Summer Session A
CHEM 300 : Undergraduate Resarch Session: A, B
This course gives undergraduate students an opportunity to participate in research in a selected area. This class satisfies the Engaged Learning requirement in the Undergraduate Research category. Students will accomplish the research task defined in the contractual arrangement between the student and the instructor.
Undergraduate Resarch, CHEM 300 , TBA, Chemistry , Summer Session A, B
DANC 394 : Internship in Dance Session: B Instructor: Sandra Kaufmann
Dance students complete a semester long internship providing an opportunity to use their technical, research or organizations skills in a professional setting. Students must complete and reflect upon 50 hours of internship experience per credit hour that is pre-approved by the Department of Fine and Performing Arts. Department permission is required.
Internship in Dance , DANC 394 , TBA, Dance, Sandra Kaufmann, Summer Session B
DANC 395: Independent Study Session: A, B Instructor: Sandra Kaufmann
Independent study projects may be of various kinds and in any recognized area of the dance. Such projects should be done under the close supervision of a dance faculty member.
Independent Study , DANC 395, TBA, dance , Sandra Kaufmann, Summer Session A, B
FNAR 199: Art and Visual Culture Session: A Instructor: Sarita Heer
An introduction to the principles of art and their application to broader visual culture, this course explores the complex nature of art through an examination of its visual elements, techniques, functions, critical methodologies, and related social issues. The course takes advantage of Chicago's artistic resources.
Art and Visual Culture , FNAR 199, Artistic knowledge , Sarita Heer, Summer Session A
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